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THE BRITISH ACADEMY 

{Dante Coinmemo7-ation 1921) 

Britain's Tribute to Dante in 
Literature and Art 

A Chronological Record of 540 Years 
(c. 1380—1920) 



By 


• 


Paget Toynbee, D.Litt. 




Fellow of the Academy 




• 


l7o7_7il_ 




3S.c|.53 



London 

Published for the British Academy 

By Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press 

Amen Comer, E.C. 



He who labours for Dante, labours to serve 
Italy, Christianity, the World.' 

(W. E. Gladstone to G. B. Giuliani.) 



ALL' 

ITALIA 

NEL SESTO CENTENARIO DELLA iMORTE 
DELL' 

ALTISSIMO POETA 

DANTE ALIGHIERI 

' DI CUI LA FAMA ANCOR NEL MOXDO DURA, 
E DUREBA QCANTO IL MOTO LONTANA ' 

TRIBUTO 

DI 

RICONOSCENZA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Prefatory Note 
Leading Dates 
Chronological Record : 

Cent. XIV 

Cent. XV . 

Cent. XVI 

Cent. XVII 

Cent. XVIII 

Cent. XIX 

Cent. XX . 
Addenda . . . . . 
Index : 

1. Literature (Authors, &c.) 

2. Art (Artists, &c.; 



PAGE 
V 

ix 

1 

2 

2 

10 

22 

89 

161 

190 

197 
210 



PREFATOKY NOTE 

This Record is the outcome of notes taken during the last 
five-and-twenty years, primarily for the purposes of several 
projected works, of which the following have been published : 
Chronological List of English Translations from Dante, from 
Chaucer to the Present Day (Boston, U.S.A., 1906); Dante in 
English Literature from Chaucer to Cary (2 vols., London, 1909) ; 
and Dante in English Art : A Chronological Record of Representa- 
tions by English Artists of Subjects from the Works of Dante, or 
connected with Dante (Boston, U.S.A., 1920) ; besides sundry 
articles in various English and foreign periodicals. In the 
preparation of the first two of the above works I availed myself 
of the admirable Catalogue of the Cornell Dante Collection (2 vols., 
Ithaca, N.Y., 1898-1900), compiled for the late Professor 
Willard Fiske by Mr. T. W. Koch ; and, to a limited extent, of 
the work on Dante and the English Poets from Chaucer to 
Tennyson (New York, 1904) by Professor Oscar Kuhns. My 
obligations to these volumes are hereby once again acknow- 
ledged. For information and references supplementary to 
my own resources I have to thank numerous friends and 
correspondents, among whom should be mentioned Professor 
H. Littledale, of Cardiff, Professor A. Farinelli, of Turin (in 
a lengthy review of Dante in English Literature in the Bullet- 
tino delta Sqcieta Dantesca Italiana), Mr. F. G. Stokes, and 
Mr. H. St. J. Brooks. 

Certain of the entries in the Record may perhaps be regarded 
as trivial ; but, as I had occasion to observe in a similar con- 
nexion in the preface to my Dante in English Literature, such 
items — trivial though they be — have a value of their own, as 
indications of the trend of current opinion with regard to 
Dante — a straw will show which way the wind blows. 

English reviews of foreign works upon Dante have as a rule 
been included, but for reasons of space not reviews of English 



vi PREFATORY NOTE 

works, except in the case of the Quarterlies, the articles in which 
for the most part partake rather of the nature of essays than 
of reviews proper, and constitute important contributions to 
Dantesque literature. Partly also from considerations of space, 
after the year 1844, the year of Gary's death, and of the publi- 
cation of the first cheap edition of his translation, by which 
time the name of Dante had become more or less of a household 
word with Englishmen, only works or articles dealing directly 
with Dante are registered, incidental allusions or quotations, 
save in cases of exceptional interest, being disregarded. 

A table of leading dates is prefixed to the Record, and an 
index in two divisions, of authors and artists, is appended. The 
addition of a few statistics rnay not be out of place here. Of 
complete English (exclusive of American i) translations of the 
Commedia there are twenty-six (the earliest, in 6-line stanzas, 
by Henry Boyd, 1802). Of independent translations of the 
Inferno there are twenty-one (the earliest, in blank verse, by 
Charles Rogers, 1782) ; of the Purgatorio there are eight (the 
earliest, in prose, by W. S. Dugdale, 1883) ; of the Paradiso 
five (the earliest, in prose, by James MacGregor, 1880, as yet 
unpublished ; the earliest published independent translation is 
that, also in prose, by P. H. Wicksteed, 1899). This gives a 
total of forty-seven translations of the Inferno, thirty-four of 
the Purgatorio, and thirty-one of the Paradiso. From these 
figures it appears that during the last 118 years (dating from 
Boyd's translation in 1802) the Commedia as a whole has been 
translated into English on an average once in about every four 
years. If the independent translations of the several divisions 
of the poem be included in the reckoning it will be found that 
an English translation of one or other of the three caniiche has 
been produced on an average once in about every twelve months 
— a record which, it is believed, cannot be paralleled in the 
literature of any other country. 

Of the 'Ugolino' episode (from Inf. xxxiii), as a separate piece, 
there are twenty-seven translations (the earliest, in 8-line 

• In the absence of any means of distinguishing them, it is possible that a few 
American writers and artists have inadvertently been included in the Record. 



PREFATORY NOTE vii 

stanzas, by Chaucer, c. 1386) ; of the ' Paolo and Francesca ' 
{Inf. v), twenty-two (the earliest, in heroic couplets, by William 
Parsons, 1785) ; of the 'Ulysses' [Inf. xxvi), five (the earliest, 
in prose, by Leigh Hunt, 1819). 

Dante's minor works, as might be expected, have attracted 
a comparatively small number of translators. Of the Vita Nuova 
there are seven English versions (the earliest by Joseph Garrow, 
published at Florence in 184G) ; of the Convivio, five (the earliest 
by Elizabeth P. Sayer, 1887) ; of the Canzoniere, three (the 
earliest by Charles Lyell, 1835) ; of the De Monarchia, two (the 
earliest by F. J. Church, 1879) ; of the De Vulgari Eloquentia, 
two (the earliest by A. G. Ferrers Howell, 1890) ; of the Epistolae, 
two (the earliest by P. H, Wicksteed, 1904) ; of the Eclogae, 
three (the earliest, in blank verse, by E. H. Plumptre, 1887) ; of 
the Quaestio de Aqua et Terra, four (the earliest by C. H. Bromby, 
1897). 

In the domain of art, the representations of the episode of 
' Paolo and Francesca ' have been by far the most numerous, there 
being more than fifty of this subject in one or other of its phases, 
of which nine are by sculptors. The earliest is a drawing by 
Fuseli (1777), who also executed the earliest oil painting (1786) ; 
the earliest sculptured representation is an alto-relievo by 
R. Westmacott (1838). Of the 'Ugolino' episode there are eight 
representations, two of which are by sculptors ; the earliest 
painting being the Academy picture by Sir Joshua Reynolds 
(1773), which is believed to be the first easel picture by any 
artist of a subject from Dante ; the earliest sculpture is that 
by J. Gallagher (1835). Of Beatrice (assuming all the repre- 
sentations to be of Dante's Beatrice ^) there are between thirty 
and forty ; while of portraits, statues, or busts of Dante himself 
there are more than twenty. Of ' illustrators ' of the Commedia 
the most famous are Flaxman, with 111 outline ' compositions ' 
(1793) ; and Blake, with 98 coloured, or partly coloured, designs 
(1824-7), of which seven (from the Inferno) were engraved 
by him and published in 1827, the year of his death. Of 

' One or two, which have no distinguishing motto in the Catalogues, may 
possibly be of the Shakespearean Beatrice in Much Ado about Nothing, 



viii PREFATORY NOTE 

other artists, the most prolific and the most widely known is 
D. G. Rossetti, who between 1849 and 1882 executed nearly 
100 paintings or drawings of subjects from the Vita Ntiova and 
Commedia, his most important and most celebrated work being 
the oil painting of ' Dante's Dream ' (1871), now in the Walker 
Art Gallery at laverpool. 

The Record, covering as it does such a wide field during a 
period of nearly five centuries and a half, naturally makes no 
claim to be exhaustive — numerous more or less serious omissions * 
there assuredly will be in an attempt of this kind, especially in 
the later and more* crowded years — 

' Ma chi pensasse il ponderoso tema, 
E r omero mortal che se ne carca, 
Nol biasmerebbe se sott' esso trema.' ^ 

Incomplete though it be, the Record constitutes a remarkable 
tribute on the part of literary and artistic Britain to the 
transcendent genius of ' the grete poete of Itaille ', who now, 
after six hundred years, has less cause than ever, as the present 
world-wide celebration testifies, for the apprehension he ex- 
pressed to the spirit of his ancestor Cacciaguida, 

' di perder viver tra coloro 
Che questo tempo chiameranno antico.' * 



' A few entries which had been overlooked, and were noted too late for insertion 
in their places in the Record, will be found in the Addetula. 
' Par. xxiii. 64-6. » Par. xvii. 119-20. 

January 1921. 



LEADING DATES 

Cent. XIV 
c. 1380. Earliest translation from the Commedia (in Chaucer's 
Troilus and Cressida, ii. 967-9). 
1384. First mention of Dante's name in English literature (in 
Chaucer's House of Fame, i. 450). 
c. 1886, Earlieit translation of the ' Ugolino ' episode (Inf. xxxiii) 
(by Chaucer, in Monk's Tale). 

Cent. XV 
1444. First recorded copy of the Commedia in England, and of the 
commentary of Giovanni da Serravalle (presented by 
Humphrey Duke of Gloucester to the University of 
Oxford). 

Cent. XVI 
c. 1513. Earliest reference to Dante's burial at Ravenna (in fragment 

of unidentified Itinerary — see Addenda). 
c. 1540. First recorded copy of a Latin translation (probably that 
of Giovanni da Serravalle) of the Commedia (seen by 
Leland, at Wells). 
1568. EarHest reference to, and translation from, the Convivio 
(by William Barker, in his translation of Gelli's Capricci 
del Bottaio). 
Earliest instance of the use of the word Dantist (by William 
Barker, in same). 
1570. Earliest quotation from the De Monarchia (by John Foxe, 

in the second edition of his Book of Martyrs). 
1577. Supposed first mention of Beatrice (as ' Maddame Beatrice ', 
by Gabriel Harvey, in A Suttle and Trecherous Advantage 
{poetically imagined) taken at unawares by the 3 Fatall 
Sisters to berive M. Gascoigne of his Life).^ 
1581. First undoubted mention of ' Dante's Beatrix ' (by 

Sir Philip Sidney, in An Apologiefor Poetrie). 
1588. Earliest quotation from the Canzonieie (by Thomas Kyd, 
in The Householders Philosophie). 

* See Dante in English Literature, i. 64, n. 2. 



X LEADING DATES 

1588. Earliest blank verse translation from the Commedia (render- 
ing of Inf. V. 121-3 by Thomas Hughes, in The Misfortunes 
of Arthur). 

1594. First recorded description of Dante's tomb at Ravenna (by 
Fynes Moryson, in his Itinerary). 

Cent. XVII 

1602. First recorded copies of the De Monorchia, and of Daniello's 
commentary on the Commedia (in Thomas James's MS. 
Bodleian catalogue). 

1605. First recorded copies of Landino's and Vellutello's com- 
mentaries on the Commedia (in Thomas James's first 
printed Bodleian catalogue). 

1612. Earliest quotation from the Vita Nuova (in the anonymous 
Passenger, of Benvenuto Italiano). 
Earliest translation from the De Monorchia (by Samson 
Lennard, in his translation of Du Plessis Mornay's 
Mysterium Iniquitatis). 

1629. First recorded copy of the Convivio (Milton writes his name 
in a copy of the third edition, Venice, 1529). 
^ 1635. Earliest quotation of any length from the Italian text of 
the Commedia (27 lines from Inf. xxxiv. 28-54, by 
Thomas Heywood, in The Hierarchie of the Blessed 
Angells). 
c. 1637. Earliest mention of Boccaccio's Vita di Dante (by Milton, 
in his Commonplace Book). 

1689. Eton College acquires two MSS. of the Commedia, by 
bequest from Sir Henry Wotton. 

1663. Earliest quotation irom a Latin translation of the Commedia 
(by Stillingfleet, in his Origines Sacrae). 

1674. First recorded copy of the editio princeps (1559) of the 
De Monorchia (in Bodleian catalogue). 
c. 1697-1700. First recorded copies of the first editions of the Com- 
media (Foligno, 1472), the Convivio (1490), and Vita 
Nuova (1576) (in the Sunderland library). i 

Cent. XVIII 
1710. Earliest mention of the De Vulgari Eloquentia (by Michael 
de la Roche, in Memoirs of Literature). 

» See under 1882, p. 131. 



LEADING DATES xi 

1715. Cambridge University acquires three MSS. of the Commedia, 
with the Moore collection presented by George I. 
c. 1716-18. Thomas Coke, of Holkham, purchases in Italy six MSS. 
of the Commedia, and one of the Convivio, 
1719. First sustained translation from the Commedia in blank 
verse (76 lines from Inf. xxxiii. 1-78, by Jonathan 
Richardson, in A Discourse on the Dignity, Certainty, 
Pleasure and Advantage, of the Science of a Connoisseur). 
1744-5. Earliest recorded copy of the De Vulgari Eloquentia (in Tris- 
sino's translation) (in Catalogus Bibliothecae Harleianae). 
c. 1745. Earliest recorded Dante drawing (copy of portrait of Dante 
by Hon. Eliz. Yorke). 
1753. The British Museum acquires five MSS. of the Commedia, 
one of the Canzoniere, and one of Boccaccio's Vita di 
Dante, with the Harleian collection. 
c. 1760. Earliest recorded translation of the Commedia (in heroic 

couplets, by William Huggins ; not published). 
1760-1. Earliest quotations from the De Vulgari Eloquentia (by 
Gray, in Observations on the Pseudo-Rhythmus). 
1761. Earliest recorded prose translation of the Inferno (by 

Charles Burney ; not pubHshed). 
1773. First easel picture of a subject from Dante (Sir Joshua 
Reynolds's ' Count Hugolino and his Children in the 
Dungeon ', exhibited at Royal Academy). 

1777. Earliest recorded drawings of subjects from the Commedia 

(by Fuseli, in British Museum). 

1778. Earliest recorded oil-painting of the episode of ' Paolo and 

Francesca ' (by anonymous artist, exhibited at Society 
of Artists of Great Britain). 

1781 . First recorded copy of the editio princeps (1577) of the Latin 

text of the De Vulgari Eloquentia (in catalogue of John 
Bowie's library). 

1782. First sustained translation in terza rima from the Commedia 

(three cantos. Inf. i-iii, by William Hayley, in notes to 

the Third Epistle of his Essay on Epic Poetry). 
First published translation of the Inferno (in blank verse, 

by Charles Rogers). 
1785. First translation of the 'Paolo and Francesca' episode, as 

a separate piece (in heroic couplets, by William Parsons, 

in The Florence Miscellany). 
1793. Flaxman's ' Compositions from the Divinu Commedia ' 

first published at Rome. 



xii LEADING DATES 



Cent. XIX 



1802. First published translation of the Commedia (in 6 - Hne 

stanzas, by Henry Boyd). 
1805. The Bodleian acquires a MS. of the Commedia with the 
D'Orville collection. 
1805-6. The Italian text of the Inferno first published, with Gary's 
translation (blank verse). 

1807. First English edition of Flaxman's ' Compositions from the 

Divina Commedia '. 
The British Museum acquires a MS. of the Commedia with 
the Lansdowne collection. 

1808. First editions (two) of the Italian text of the Commedia. 

1809. First edition of the Italian text of the Canzoniere. 

1814. Cary's translation of the Commedia first published (3 vols., 

32 mo.). 
1817. The Bodleian acquires fourteen MSS. of the Commedia, and 
one containing the Vita Nuova, Convivio, and Canzoniere, 
with the Canonici collection. 
1819. Second edition of Cary's Dante (3 vols., 8vo.). 
1819-20. Third and fourth editions of the Italian text of the 

Commedia. 
1822-3. Fifth edition of the Italian text of the Commedia (the first 

by an English publisher, W. Pickering). 
1824-7. Blake's coloured designs from^the Commedia executed. 
1827. Seven engravings of Blake's designs from the Inferno 
published. 
Sixth edition of the Italian text of the Commedia (the first 
English edition in one volume). 
1829. ■ The British Museum acquires three MSS. of the Commedia 
with the Egerton collection, bequeathed by the Earl of 
Bridgewater. 
1831. Third edition of Cary's Dante (3 vols., 12mo.). 
1833. Wright's translation (bastard terza rima) of the Inferno first 

published. 
1835. First sculptured representation of the ' Ugolino 'episode (basso- 
relievo, by J. Gallagher, exhibited at Royal Academy). • 
First translation of the Canzoniere (in unrhymed verse, by 
Charles Lyell). 
1886. Wright's translation of the Purgatorio first pubUshed. 

The British Museurii acquires by purchase at the Heber sale 
a MS. of the Commedia. 



LEADING DATES 



xui 



1838. First sculptured representation of the ' Paolo and Francesca ' 

episode (alto-relievo, by Richard Westmacott, exhibited 
at Royal Academy). 

1839. Seventh edition of the Italian text of the Commedia. 

1840. Wright's translation of the Paradiso first published. 
Second edition of Lyell's translation of the Canzoniere. 
Kirkup makes drawing (water-colour) of the Giotto portrait 

of Dante at Florence, and takes tracing of it. 
c. 18 12. Kirkup makes full-sized water-colour sketch of the Giotto 
portrait (reproduced by chromolithography for the 
Arundel Society in 1859). 

1843. F'lTstterza rima translation of the lnferno(h\ John Dayman).^ 

1844. Fourth edition of Gary's Dante (the first in one ^'olume, and 

the last in his lifetime). 

1845. First collected edition of Wright's Danie (3 vols., 12mo.). 
Third and last edition of Lyell's translation of the Can- 
zoniere. 

1846. First published translation of the Vita Nuova (by Joseph 

Garrow). 

1849. D. G. Rossetti's first Dante drawing (sketch of ' Dante 

drawing an Angel ', in Birmingham Art Gallery). 
First published prose translation of the Inferno (by J. A. 
Carlyle). 

1850. R. W. Church's essay on Dante first published (in Christian 

Remembrancer). 
1851-4. First terza rima translation of the Commedia (by C. B. 
Cayley). 

1852. First prose translation of the Commedia (by E. O'Donnell). 

1853. The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Hawtrey 

sale a MS. of the Commedia. 

1854. Third edition of Wright's Dante (the first in one volume). 
1859. Chromolithograph by Vincent Brooks of Kirkup 's drawing 

of the Giotto portrait of Dante published by the Arundel 
Society. 
The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Libri sale 
a MS. of the Commedia. 

1861. D. G. Rossetti's translation of the Vita Nuova first published 

(in his Early Italian Poets). 

1862. Theodore Martin's translation of the Vita Nuova first 

published. 

' It the unpublislied terza rima translation by Abraham Heraud is correctly 
dated c. 1840, Dayman's would take second place. 



xiv LEADING DATES 

1863. D. G. Rossetti's oil-painting of ' Beata Beatrix ' (in Tate 

Gallery). 

1864. F. Leighton's oil-painting of ' Dante in Exile ' (exhibited 

at Royal Academy). 

1865. The Latin Verse Prize at Oxford gained by a poem, Dantis 

Exsilium (by R. B. Michell). 

1871. D. G. Rossetti's oil-painting of ' Dante's Dream ' (in 

Walker Art Gallery at Liverpool). 
Maria Francesca Rossetti's Shadow of Dante first published. 

1872. J. A. Symonds's Introduction to the Study of Dante first 

published. 

1876. University College, London, receives bequest from Dr. 

Barlow of his Dante collection. 
Oxford Dante Society founded. 

1877. The Taylorian Library at Oxford acquires by purchase 

from Naples a MS. of the Paradise, with Buti's com- 
mentary. 

1 878. Barlow Lectureship on Dante at University College, London, 

inaugurated. 

1879. First translation of the De Monarchia (by F. J. Church). 
G. F. Watts's oil-painting of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (in 

Watts Gallery at Compton). 

1880. E. Moore acquires by purchase from Rome a MS. of the 

Commedia and a MS. of the Convivio. 
A. J. Butler's edition of the Purgatorio first published. 

1881. London Dante Society founded. 

1882. The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Sunderland 

sale a MS. of the Inferno, with the commentary of Guido 
da Pisa. 

1883. H. Holiday's oil-painting of ' Dante and Beatrice ' (in 

Walker Art Gallery at Liverpool). 

1885. A. J. Butler's edition of the Paradise first published. 

1886. The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Wodhull 

sale a MS. of Giovanni da Serravalle's Latin commentary 
on the Commedia. 

1887. First translation of the Eclogae (by E. H. Plumptre, in 

The Commedia and Canzoniere of Dante Alighieri). 
E. Moore's Time-References in the Divina Commedia. 
First published translation of the Convivio (by Elizabeth P. 

Sayer). 
First course of University Extension Lectures on Dante 

(by P. H. Wicksteed). 



LEADING DATES xv 

1889. E. Moore's Contributions to tJie Textual Criticism of the 

Divina Commedia. 
W. W. Vernon's Readings on tlie Purgatorio first published. 

1890. First translation of the De Vulgari Eloqueniia (by A. G. 

Ferrers Howell). 
1892. The John Rylands Library at Manchester acquires by 
purchase from Earl Spencer the Althorp library, in which 
was included an unrivalled series of early editions of the 
Com7nedia. 
A. J. Butler's edition of the Inferno. 

First edition of the Italian text of the Vita Nziova (privately 
printed by R. R. Whitehead). 

1894. The Oxford Dame fust published (the first one- volume 

edition of Tutte le Opere di Dante). 
VV. W. Vernon's Readings on the Inferno first published. 

1895. Taylorian Lectureship on Dante instituted at Oxford. 
Trinity College, Cambridge, receives donation from Lady 

Pollock of the Pollock Dante collection. 

1896. E. Moore's Studies in Dante : First Series. 

1897. First translation of the Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (by 

C. H. Bromby). 

1898. E. G. Gardner's Dante's Ten Heavens. 

Paget Toynbee's Dante Dictionary first published. 

1899. E. Moore's Studies in Dante : Second Series. 

1900. W. W. Vernon's Readings on the Paradiso first published. 

Cent. XX 

1901. H. F. Tozer's English Commentary on the Divina Com- 

media. 
The John Rylands Library acquires by purchase with the 
Crawford MSS. a MS. of the Commedia, and a MS. of the 
Canzoni. 

1902. P. H. Wicksteed and E. G. Gardner's edition of the 

Eclogae (in Dante and Giovanni del Virgilio). 
Stephen Phillips's play of Paolo and Francesca produced at 

St. James's Theatre by George Alexander. 
Paget Toynbee's Dante Studies and Researches. 

1903. E. Moore's Studies in Dante : Third Series. 

First Australian translation of the Inferno (in blank verse, 

by Sir S. W. Griffith). 
Sardou and Moreau's play of Dante produced at Drury Lane 

by Henry Irving. 



xvi LEADING DATES 

1904. First translation of the Epistolae (by P. H. Wicksteed, in 

Translation of the Latin Works of Dante). 
1906. Manchester Dante Society founded. 

1908. The John Rylands Library acquires by purchase a MS. of 

the Cominedia. 

1909. W. W. Jackson's traiislation of the Convivio. 

C. L. Shadwell's revised text and translation of the Quaestio 
de Aqua et Terra. 

1910. Paget Toynbee's Life and Works of Dante. 

1911. First Australian translation of the Cominedia (in blank 

verse, by Sir S. W. Griffith). 

1912. The record price of £1,800 paid at the Huth sale at Sotheby's 

for a copy of the 1481 Florence edition of the Commedia, 
with nineteen engravings after Botticelli. 

1913. Oriel College, Oxford, receives donation from Miss Church 

of Dean Church's Dante collection. 
E. G. Gardner's Dante and tlie Mystics. 

1916. The Bodleian acquires a MS. of the Commedia, and a MS. 

of the Convivio, by bequest from Dr. Moore ; and 350 
• volumes of editions of the works of Dante by donation 
from Dr. Paget Toynbee. 
Queen's College, Oxford, receives bequest from Dr. Moore 
of his Dante collection. 

1917. E. Moore's Studies in Dante : Fourth Series. 

The Bodleian receives donation of busts, masks, and 
portraits of Dante, and about 600 volumes of editions, 
commentaries, and translations of the works of Dante, 
from Dr. Paget Toynbee. 

1918. Stephen Philpot's opera of Dante and Beatrice produced at 

the Prince of Wales Theatre, Birmingham. 
1920. Paget Toynbee's edition, with revised text and translation, 
of the Epistolae. 
Walford Davies's ' Fantasy from the Purgatorio ' performed 
at the Worcester Festi^^al. 



BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE IN 
LITERATURE AND ART 

(c. 1380-1920) 

Cent. XIV 
c. 1380-2 
Geoffrey Chaucer : translation of Inf. ii. 127-9 ; Par. xxxiij. 
13-15 ; Inf. iii. 112-14 ; Par. xiv. 28-30 (in Troilus and Cressida, 
ii. 967-9 ; iii. 1261-3 ; iv. 225-7 ; v. 1863-5). 

1382 
Chaucer : translation of Inf. ii. 1-3 ; iii. 19-20 ; Purg. xxviii. 14, 
16-18 (in Parlement ofFoules, 11. 85-6, 169-70, 201-3). 

1384. 
Chaucer largely indebted to the Divina Commedia in the House of 
Fame, in which (i. 450) the name of Dante occurs for the first time in 
English literature ; translation of Inf. ii. 7-9 ; Par. i. 19, 22-6 (in 
House of Fame, ii. 15-18 ; iii. 19, 11-13, 15-17). 

c. 1385-6 
Chaucer: translationof Jn/. xiii. 64-6 ; v. 100 (in Legend of Good 
Women, Prol. 358-9, 503) ; Purg. xxi. 31-2 (in Legend of Dido, 1. 181) ; 
Inf. vii. 64 (in Legend of Ypermystra, 1. 77). 

c. 1386-8 
Chaucer : translation of Purg. i. 19-20 ; Inf. v. 100 ; xiii. 40-4 
(in Knight's Tale, 11. 635-6, 903, 1479-82) ; Inf. v. 100 (in Man of 
Lazc's Tale, 1. 600); Par. xxxiii. 16-21 (in Prioress's Tale, Prol. 
11. 22-6) ; Inf. xxxiii. 43-75 ; v. 56 (in Monk's Tale, 11. 433-65, 487) ; 
Purg. vii. 121-3 (in Wife of Bath's Tale, 11. 272-4) ; Inf. v. 100 (in 
Merchant's Tale, I. 742 ; in Squire's Tale, 1. 479) ; Par. xxxiii. 1-12, 
16-21 (in Second Nun's Tale, Prol. 11. 36-44, 50-6) ; Dante coupled 
with Virgil as an authority on Hell, in Friar's Tale, 11. 221-2. 

c. 1390 

Chaucer indebted to the canzone (' Le dolci rime d'amor ') 

prefixed to Book iv of the Conuivio in his Balade of Gentillesse, as 

well probably as in the Wife of Bath's Tale (11. 290 ff.). 

[The dates assigned to Chaucer's poems are for the most part conjectural. 
For Chaucer's debt to Dante in the House of Fame, see Toynbee, Dante in 
English Literature, i. 3-9.] 

B 



2 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

c. 1390 — coniinued. 

John Gower relates in his Confessio Amantis (vii. 2329-87) ' How 

Dante the Poete answerde To a flatour '. 

[This anecdote, which Gower omitted from the latest recension of his 
poem, was probably derived from Book ii of Petrarcli's Res Metnorandae.] 

Cent. XV 

1416-17 
Giovanni da Sereavalle, Bishop of Fermo, writes a translation 
in Latin prose of the Divina Commedia, together with a Latin com- 
mentary, at the instance of two English Bishops, Nicholas Bubwith 
of Bath and Wells, and Robert Hallam of Salisbury (formerly 
Chancellor of the University of Oxford), while attending the Council 
of Constance. 

[In the Preambula to this work Serravalle, who had himself visited England, 
makes the interesting but not otherwise substantiated statement that 
Dante was a student at Oxford — ' dilexit theologiam sacram, in qua diu 
studuit tam in Oxoniis in regno Angliae, quam Parisiis in regno Franciae.'] 

1430-8 

John Lydgate, in the Prologue of the fourthe boke of his Fall of 
Princes, refers to ' Daunt . . . Whose thre bokes the great wonders 
tell Of hevyn above, of purgatorie and of hell ' (ed. 1527, fol. xcix) ; 
and in the XXXII chapter of the nynth boke describes how ' Daunt of 
Florence, the laureate poete ', appeared to ' Johnn Bochas ' in his 
study (fol. ccxi). 

1444 

(Feb. 25.) Humphrey Duke of Gloucester presents to the Uni- 
versity of Oxford two MSS. of Dante — Commentaria Dantes and 
Liber Dantes — together with works of Petrarch and Boccaccio. 

[The first MS. was a copy of the Latin commentary on the Divina Commedia 
written by Giovanni da Serravalle 27 years before (see under 1416-17). 
This same MS. was catalogued a century later by John Leiand among the 
MSS. in the Library of the University of Oxford (see under 1536-42). The 
second MS. was a copy of the Italian text of the Divina Commedia. (See 
Times Literary Supplement, March 18 ; April 22, 1920.)] 

Cent. XVI 

c. 1528 
Sir David Lyndsay introduces numerous imitations and reminis- 
cences of the Divina Commedia in The Dreme of Schir David 
Lyndesay. 

[See Courthope, History of English Poetry, ii. 107 ; and Toynbee, Dante in 
English Literature, i. 26-8.1 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 8 

1536-42 
John Leland, in his notes made during his tour through England 
in these years as ' King's antiquary ', registers a copy of Commentarii 
Joannes de Seravala super opera Dantis Aligerii, in the University 
Library at Oxford ; and Dantes tralatus in carmen Latinum, at 
Wells. 

[See Leland, Collectanea, ed. Heame, 1715 (iv. 58, 155). The copy of 
Serravalle's commentary was no doubt identical with the Commentaria 
Dantes presented to the University by Humphrey Duke of Gloucester in 
1444 (see under that date). The MS. at Wells was probably a copy of 
Serravalle's translation (wrongly described, it being a line-for-line prose 
version), the gift perhaps of Bishop Bubwith, the founder of the Cathedral 
Library, and one of the two English bishops at whose instance the trans- 
lation was made (see under 1416-17).] 

c. 1540 

Anecdote of ' Dantes ansvvere to the jester ', in Tales and Quicke 
Answeres, very mery and pleasant to rede. 

[The story comes from Book il of Petrarch's Res Memorandae.] 

1542 

Lelaxd, in an epigram ' Anglus par Italis ', in his Naeniae in 
mortem Thomae Viati Equitis Incomparabilis, rates Sir Thomas Wyatt 
the Elder as not inferior to Dante and Petrarch. 

c. 1542 
Leland, in his Epigrammata (first printed in 1589), compares 
Chaucer to Dante and Petrarch, and describes Henry Count of 
Saxony as the equal of any of the three (ed. 1589, pp. 80, 98). 

1542-3 
In the Catalogue of the Library of Henry VIII at Westminster is 
registered a copy of ' Danti's works in the Castilian tongue '. 

[See Edwards, Libraries and Founders of Libraries, pp. 152 ff. The work 
in question was probably a MS. copy of the earliest Spanish translation 
of the Divina Commedia, the prose version made in 1427-8 by Enrique 
de Villena (see Bull. Soc. Dant. Hal, N.S. xiii. 274).] 

C. 1545 
Henry Parker, Lord Morley, in the dedication to Henry VIII 
of his translation of Boccaccio's De Claris Mulieribu^, speaks of 
Dante, ' for hys greate learnynge in hys mother tunge, surnamyde 
dyvyne Dante ', Petrarch and Boccaccio, as ' three excellente clerkes 
of Italy '. 

[See Waldron's Literary Museum, Lond. 1792, pp. 1-8.] 

B2 



4 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1548 
John Bale, in his Illustrium Majoris Britanniae Scriptorum 
Sumrnarium, compares Chaucer to Dante and Petrarch {Centuria 
Quarta, fol. 198). 

1549 
William Thomas, in his Historic of Italic (fol. 201), refers to Dante's 
account {Inf. xx. 55-93) of the founding of Mantua. 

1550 

William Thomas, in his Principal Rules of the Italian Grammer, 
with a Dictionarie for the better understandynge of Boccace, Pethrarcha, 
and Dante (second ed., 1560 ; third, 1562 ; fourth, 1567), explains 
sundry words used by Dante in the Divina Commedia. 

1554 
William Barker, in his Epitaphia et Inscriptiones Ltigubrcs 
(second ed., 1566), prints the lines on Dante from the picture of him 
by Domenico di Michelino in the Duomo at Florence. 

1559 
John Foxe (as is believed) sees through the press of Johannes 
Oporinus at Basle the editio princeps of the De Monarchia, as one 
of four tracts on the Roman Empire in the volume Andref Alciaii De 
formula Romani Imperii (Basil. 1559). 
[See Athenaeum, Apr. 14, 1906.] 

1561 
Sir Thomas Hoby, in The Courtyer of Count Baldessar Castilio, 
refers to Petrarca, Dante, and Boccaccio, as ' three noble writers of 
Tuscane '. 

1565 
Thomas Cooper, in his Thesaurus Linguae Romanae el Britannicae, 
includes ' Dantes. A poet of Florence.' 

1567 
John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, in his Defence of the Apologic 
of the Churche of Englande, refers to Dante's denunciation of Rome 
in Purgaiorio, xxxii. 148 ff., this being the first citation in English 
literature of Dante as a writer against Rome. 

1568 

William Barker, in The Fearfull Fansies of the Florentine Cvuper, 

in which are many references to Dante, translates six passages from 

the Divina Commedia, viz. (in prose), Purg. xxv. 88-96 ; (in verse), 

Purg. xxxi. 62-8 ; iii. 138-4 ; xxvii. 140-1 ; Par. xxvii. 106-8, 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 5 

115-20; and three from the Convivio, viz. i. 11, 11. 72-82; 12, 
11. 1 -6 ; iv. 27, 11. 37-40 ; these being the first mentions of that 
treatise (' Dants Banquet ') in English literature. Barker also in 
this work uses the word ' Dantist ' for the first time in English. 

Thomas Churchyard, in his preliminary verses to the Pithy 
pleasaunt and profitable Workes ofMaister Skelton, mentions ' Marrot, 
Petrark, and Dantte ' among jioets whom ' forrayn realms advance '. 

1570 
John Foxe, in The First Volume of the Ecclesiasticall History 
contaynyng the Acles and Monumentes of thynges passed in every 
Kynges tyme in this Realme (foil. 485 b-486 a), quotes from the 
De Monarchia (iii. 10), Par. xxix. 94-6, 106-8 ; ix. 132-5, and Purg. 
xxxii. 142-6, 148-50, to show that Dante was a foe to the enemies 
of truth. 

[The quotations from Dante, which include the earliest reference in Eng- 
lish literature to the De Monarchia, do not occur in the first edition (1563).] 

1576 
Robert Peterson, in the Galateo of Maister lohn Delia Casa, 
translates (in verse) Inf. i. 68-9 ; xxiii. 101-2 ; xxv. 2 ; xvii. 117 ; 
Purg. xviii. Ill, 113-14 ; xxx. 142-5 ; Par. xvii. 129 ; Purg. xxx. 131 
(foil. 73-87). 

1577 
Gabriel Harvey, in A Suttle and Trechrous Advantage (poetically 
imagined) taken at unaivares by the 3 Fatall Sisters to berive M. Gascoigne 
of his Life, imagines Gascoigne in the next world, where he shall see 
' Maddame Beatrice ' and Dante (?). 

[It the identification be correct, this is the first mention in English litera- 
ture of Dante's Beatrice (see Darile in English Literature, i. 63— *).] 

1578 
Gabriel Harvey, in his Gratulationes Valdinenses, asserts that 
his muse owes nothing to Petrarch, Boccaccio, or Dante. 

1580 
Thoaias Churchyard, in ' The Phantasticall Monarkes Epitaphe ', 
in Churchyards Chxince, maintains that though ' Dant, JMarrot, and 
Petrark ' be dead, the spirit of poetry is not dead. 

1581 
George PErriE, in The Civile Conversacion of M. Stephen Guazzo, 
translates (in verse) Inf. xi. 92-3 ; xvi. 124 -G ; Par. xvi. 76 ; viii. 
142-8. 



6 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1581 — continued. 
Thomas Churchyard, in a letter to Sir Christopher Hatton 
(July 10), includes Dante among poets whose ' fortune hath been ever 
poor and needy '. 

[See Sir H. Nicolas, Life and Times of Sir Christopher Hatton, Lond., 1847, 
p. 176.] 

Sir Philip Sidney, in An Apologie for Poetrie, holds that ' the 
first that made the Italian language aspire to be a Treasure-house 
of Science, were the poets Dante, Boccace, and Petrarch ' ; that 
' whatsoever the Historian is bound to recite, that may the Poet (if 
he list) with his imitation make his own . . . having all, from Dante his 
heaven, to hys hell, under the authoritie of his penne ' ; and that the 
soul of him who believes that the poet can confer immortality, per- 
chance ' shal be placed with Dante's Beatrix, or Virgil's Anchises '. 

[The last passage contains the first luidoubted mention of Dante's Beatrice 
in English literature ; for a doubtful earlier mention by Gabriel Harvey, 
see under 1577.] 

1582 
Laurence Humphrey, in the Praefatio to his Jesuitisme Pars 
Prima, describes Chaucer as ' quasi alter Dantes aut Petrarcha ', 
two poets in whose opinion Rome was the seat of Antichrist. 

1583 
Robert Greene, in Mamillia : The Second Part of the Triumph 
of Pallas, quotes an alleged ' saying of Dant, that love cannot 
roughly be thrust out but it must easily creepe, and woman must 
seeke by little and little to recover her former libertie, wading in love 
like the Crab, whose pace is always backward '. 

[There is nothing in Dante's works which bears the least resemblance to 
this ' saying '.] 

1584 

George Whetstone, in A Mirourfor Magestrates of Cyties, quotes 
Dante's opinion (from Convivio, i. 11. 11. 52-6) as to the fickleness 
of the populace (fol. 21). 

Robert Greene, in The Debate between Follie and Love, among 
' sodaine and sundrie causes ' of the springing of love, instances 
' reading in a Booke, as the Ladie Francis Rimhi ' (i. e. Francesca da 
Rimini, as told by Dante in Inf. v. 127 ff.). 

1585 
Samuel Daniel, in the address ' To the Friendly Reader ', in his 
Paulus louius, mentions ' Petrarch, Ariosto, Dante, and Bembo ' 
among famous writers in the Italian tongue. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 7 

1586 

Baktholojiew Young, in Tlie Fourth Booke of the Civile Con- 
versacion of M. Stephen Guazzo, translates from Purg. xxii. 145-6 
Dante's reference to the drinking of water by Roman women. 

George Whetstone, in TJie English Myrror, quotes again (see 
under 1584) Dante's opinion (from Convivio, i. 11, 11. 52-6) of the 
populace (p. 20). 

1587 

Thomas Churchyard, in The Worthiness of Wales, says that to 
praise Wales aright he would need the skill of Ovid or Homer, or 
the muse of ' Dant, or Chawser, or Petrarke '. 

Robert Greene, in his Farewell to Follie, gives an alleged transla- 
tion of ' certaine verses written by Dante ' as to the consequences 
of gluttony. 

[These verses, like the alleged saying of Dante previously quoted by 
Greene (see under 1583), are not to be found in Dante's works.] 

1588 

Thomas Kyd, in The Householders Philosophie, quotes Dante's 
saying ' in his Canzonet of Noblesse ' (Canz. viii. 123), ' that the soule 
was espoused to the bodie ' (fol. 9) ; he also quotes and translates 
(in verse) what Dante (' that Thoscan Poet ') says of master and 
servant. Inf. xvii. 90 (fol. 15) ; and Dante's contention (after 
Aristotle) that usury is a sin, Tnf xi. 101-11 (foil. 25-6). 

Thomas Hughes, in The Misfortunes of Arthur, introduces a blank 
verse rendering of Inf. v. 121-3 (' Of all misfortunes and unhappy 
Fates Th' unhappiest seems, to have been happie once '). 

1589 
George Puxtenham, in The Arte of English Poesie, in reference to 
the influence on Wyatt and Surrey of ' the s weete and stately measures 
and stile of the Italian Poesie ', describes them as ' novices newly 
crept out of the schooles of Dante, Ariosto and Petrarch ' (Bk. i, 
chap. 31). 

1590 
The anonymous author of Tarlton Newes out of Purgatoric argues 
for the existence of a ' meane betwixt heaven and hel ', namely, 
' Quoddam tertium a third place that al our great grandmothers have 
talkt of, that Dant hath so learnedly writ of, and that is Purgatorie ' 
(pp. 2-3). 



8 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1590-6 
Edmund Spenser (as is alleged) imitates Dante in numerous 
passages in The Faerie Queene. 

[As to Spenser's supposed indebtedness to the Divina Comme&ia, see 
Dante in English Literaliire, i. 81-2.] 

1591 

Sir John Harington, in the preface to Orlando Furioso in English 
Heroical Verse, refers to the episode of Dante's meeting with Virgil 
after he had wandered out of the right way {Inf. i. 61 ff.) ; in the 
AUegorie of the Fourth Booke he quotes and translates (in verse) 
Inf. i. 1-3; and in the AUegorie of the XXVI Booke he refers to 
Dante's likening of covetousness to ' a wolfe pined with famine ' 
{Inf. i. 49-50). 

John Florio, in ' the third chapter, of familiar morning communi- 
cation ', of Florios Second Fnttes, introduces il cavallo di Dante 
(' Dante his horse '), and Risposta Dantesca (' a dantish answer '). 

1592 
Abraham Fraunce, in The Third Part of the Countesse ofPembrokes 
Ivychurch, discussing various means by which it was proposed an 
embassy should reach Heaven, says, ' Some thought it best to goe 
by water ; others, rather by land, through some great forrest, as 
Dante did ' (/«/. i. 2 ff.) (fol. 50). 

1593 

Thomas Churchyard, in Churchyards Challenge, compares 
' Petrarke ' and ' Dawnt ' with Homer and Virgil. 

Barnabe Barnes, ui the tenth elegy of Parthenophil and Parthe- 
nophe, introduces (as is alleged) an imitation of Canz. ii, V. N. § 23 
(' Donna pietosa '). 

Gabriel Harvey, in Pierce's Supererogation, declares Du Bartas 
as a poet to be ' nothing inferiour unto Dante (whome some Italians 
preferre before Virgil, or Homer) '. 

1594 
Fynes Moryson, in his Itinerary, records his visit to the tomb of 
Dante at Ravenna (his description of which is the first by an English- 
man that has been preserved) ; and transcribes and translates the 
two Latin epitaphs (' Exigua tumuli ' and ' Jura Monarchiae '). 

1595 
Thomas Churchyard, in A Praise of Poetrie, names ' Dant, 
Bocace, and Petrarke ' as ' Three men of speechall spreete ' who ' In 
Italy of yore did dwell '. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART . 9 

William Covkll, in his Polimanteia, says that ' renowned Florence 
had never been reputed as the flower of Italie ', had it not been for 
' laureat Petrarch, Dantes, Accursius, Aretin, and the famous Duke 
Cosmus Medices '. 

1597 

Robert Tofte quotes Par. i. 34 : ' Poca favilla gran fiamma 
seconda.' as motto on the title-page of his Laura: The Toyes of 
a Traveller. 

Michael Drayton, in a note to the ' Epistle of the Earl of Surrey 
to the Lady Geraldine '., in England's Heroicall Epistles, describes 
Florence as ' a City of Tuscan, standing upon the River Arnus 
(celebrated by Dante, Petrarch, and other the most Noble Wits of 
Italy) '. 

1598 

John Floeio, in ' The Epistle Dedicatorie ' of A Worlds of Wordes, 
discussing the styles of various Italian writers, says ' Boccace is 
prettie hard, yet understood : Petrarche harder, but explaned : 
Dante hardest, but commented. Some doubt if all aright.' 

JoHX Keper, in ' The second daies Discourse ' of The Courtiers 
Academic, translates (twice) the saying of ' Dant a Poet of great 
authoritie ' that ' Love exempteth none beloved fro loving ' {Inf. 
V. 103) ; in ' The fift dayes Discourse ', which treats of nobility, he 
translates Dante's definition in Canz. viii. 101, and the Emperor 
Frederick's definition as recorded by Dante in Conv. iv. 3, 11. 38, 43-5. 

Francis Meres, in ' A Comparative Discourse of our English 
Poets, with the Greeke, Latine, and Italian Poets ', in Palladia 
Tamia, ranks Matthew Roydon with Dante. 

Thomas Speght, in The Workes of Geffrey Chaucer, Newly Printed, 
says that Chaucer enriched and beautified the English tongue, 
' following the example of Dantes and Petrarch, who had done the 
same for the Italian tongue.' 

Sir Robert Dallington, in A Method for Trauell, names Dante 
and Petrarcji as ' the best Authouit; of Tuscaine '. 

c. 1600 
John Donne (as is supposed) refers to the Divina Commedia in his 
Fourth Satire, where he says (11. 157-9) he fell into ' a trance Like his, 
who dreamt he saw hell '. 

1600 
Edward Fairfax, in his Godfrey of Bulloigne, in ' The Allegory of 
the Poem,' speaks of ' the Comedy of Dantes ' as a figure of the 
contemplative life. 



10 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

Cent. XVII 
1602 
Sir Henry Danvers presents to the Bodleian Library at Oxford 
a copy of the Divina Commedia with the commentary ofDaniello 
(see under 1602-3). 

1602-3 

Thomas James, in his MS. Catalogus Librorum aliquot in Bibliotheca 

Bodlejana, registers a foHo edition of Dantis de Monarchia, and two 

editions of the Divina Commedia, viz. Dante con Espos. di M. Bern. 

Daniello di Lucca, and Dante dell inferno et purgatorio. Ven. 1515. 

[The copy of tlie De Monarchia was doubtless the edition published at 
Basle in folio in 1566. The copy of Daniello's edition of the Divina Com- 
media (published at Venice in 1568) was the gift of Sir Henry Danvers 
(afterwards Earl of Danby) in 1602. The Venice edition of 1515 was the 
second Aldine edition.] 

1603 

Sir Michael Dormer presents to the Bodleian Library a copy of 
the Divina Commedia with the commentary of Landino (see under 
1605). 

1604 

Nicholas Breton, in The Passionate Skepfieard, in a list of the 
poets of Italy, speaks of ' Ariostos best mvention, Dantes lest obscur'd 
intention '. 

1605 

Sir Robert Dallington, in his Survey of the Great Dukes State of 
Tuscany, mentions ' Petrarche and Dante for singular Poets ' among 
the famous men of Florence ; and in his account of Pisa describes 
the ' Torre della Fame ', and refers to the story of the death there by 
starvation of Count Ugolino at the hands of the Archbishop Ruggiero, 
' of whom Dante the Poet in his 33. chapter delV inferno, very 
elegantly discourseth, faining, that there for a torment due to such 
a fact, the Conte liveth upon the Bishops-head with a never satisfied 
greed inesse.' 

John Sanford, in his Grammer, or Introduction to the Italian 
Tongue, gives motto from Dante {Par. xxvi. 130-2) on his title-page, 
and quotes and translates Inf. ii. 37, and Purg. i. 66. 

Ben Jonson, in Volpone, or the Fox, represents Lady Politick as 
having read Petrarch, Tasso, Dante, Guarini, Ariosto, and Aretino, 
and as saying ' Dante is hard, and few can understand him ' (Act iii. 
So. 2). 

Thomas James, in his Catalogus Librorum Bibliothecae Publicae . . . 
in Academia Oxoniensi, registers four editions of the Divina Com- 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 11 

media, viz. Dante con la espositione di Aless. Velutello. Ven. 1544 ; 

Dante con com. di Christ. Landino. Ven. 1512 ; Dante con coin, di 

Landino. Ven. 1484 ; and Dante con Vespos. di M. Bern. Daniello. 

Ven. 1568. 

[The first of these was the editio princeps of Vellutello's commentary ; the 
seeond was purchased out of a sum of £100 given to the Library in 1600 
by Lord Buckhurst, Chancellor of the University ; the third was the gift 

• of Sir Michael Dormer in 160.3 ; the last was included in the Catalogue of 

1602-3.] 

C. 1610 
In The most Elegant and Wittie Epigrams of Sir John Harington 

is one on ' A good answer of the Poet Dant to an Atheist ' (Bk. iv. 

Epig. xvii). 

[The Epigrams were not published till 1615, three years after Harington's 
death. The story of Dante and the atheist conies from the Facezie of 
Poggio Fiorentino.] 

John Pits, in the account of Chaucer in his Deillustribus Britanniae 
Scriptoribus, compares him with Dante and Petrarch. 

1610 

Alexander Cooke, in Pope Joane : A Dialogue betweene a Pro- 
testant and a Papist, refers to Dante's strictures on six of the Popes, 
viz. Anastasius II, Nicholas III, Boniface VIII, Clement V, John 
XXII, and Celestine V. 

1611 

John Florid, in Queen Anne's New World of Words, or Dictionarie 

of the Italian and English Tongues, in the list of ' Authors and Books 

that have been read of purpose for the Collecting of this Dictionarie ' 

mentions the commentaries on the Divina Commedia of Vellutello, 

Daniello, Boccaccio, and Landino ; and in the Dictionarie itself he 

gives (from Landino's commentary) the interpretations of the names 

of the devils used by Dante, and of several of the divisions of the 

Inferno. 

1612 

In the anonymous Passenger, of Benvenuto Italian Dante's defini- 
tion of love (from Son. x, V.N. § 20) is quoted. 

Samson Lennard, in The Mysterie of Iniquitie, by Philip Morney, 
translates (pp. 444-5) (in verse) Purg. xvi. 127-9 ; (in prose) 
Par. ix. 131-41 ; xviii. 127-30 ; xxix. 89-96, 104-7 ; and De Monar- 
chia, iii. 3, 11. 53-69. 

1613 

Thomas James, in his MS. Catalogus Omnium exactissimus Librorum 
in Bibliotheca Bodleiana, besides the four editions of the Divina 
Commedia included in his Catalogus of 1605, registers a copy of the 
De Monorchia published at Offenbach in 1610. 



12 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1615 
Robert Tofte, in his notes to Tlw Blazon of Jealousie, says that 
of ' seaven kindes of Poetizing in the Florentine tongue , . . the first 
and principall is that of Dant and Petrarcq ' ; and he gives a brief 
biographical notice of Dante, with an account of his tomb at Ravenna ; 
and translates (in verse) Canz. xiii. 1-3. 

c. 1617 

Fynes Moryson, in Part iii of his Itinerary, refers to Dante's 

denunciation of Rome as Babylon (the reference being probably to 

Inf. xix. 106 ff.) ; and in Part iv, in an account of the most famous 

men of Florence, mentions ' Dante, Petrarcha, Boccacio, for Poets '. 

1618 
Nicholas Breton', in The Court and Country, or a Briefe Discourse 
betweene the Courtier and Country-Man, puts an alleged saying of 
Dante into the mouth of the Country-Man : ' If I speake not to your 
purpose, I will speake to mine owne : and I will say as one Dante, 
an Italian Poet, once said in an obscure Booke of his, Understand 
me that can, I understand my selfe.' 

[No such saying as the above occurs anywhere in the works of Dante.] 

c. 1620 

William Drummond, in his Poems, imitates (as is supposed) 

Dante among other Italian poets ; thus in Sonnet viii he speaks of 

stars as ' nymphs ', as does Dante in Par. xxiii. 26 ; and in Sonnet xlvi 

he says ' passed pleasures double but new woe ', which may be 

a reminiscence oi Inf. v. 121-3. 

[Drummond is known to have possessed a copy of the Divina Commedia 
(Venice, Giolito, 1555), whicli eventually passed into the Heber collection.] 

John Donne, in his satirical Catalogus Librorum, gives as No. 30 : 

' Quintessentia inferni ; sive camera privata infernalis, ubi tractatur 

de loco quinto ab Homero, Virgilio, Dante.' 

1620 
Thomas James, in his Catalogus Universalis Librorum in Bibliotheca 
Bodleiana, registers five editions of the Divina Commedia, and one 
of the De Monarchia, all of which had been included in one or other 
of his previous catalogues (see under 1602-3, 1605, 1613). 

1621 

Robert Burton, in The Anatomy of Melancholy, refers in Part i 
(' Poverty and Want, Causes of Melancholy ') to the story how 
' Dantes that famous Italian Poet, by reason his clotlies were but 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 18 

mean, could not be admitted to sit down at a feast '. In Part ii 

(' Digression of Ayre ') he enquires ' what is the centre of the earth ? 

... is it the place of hell, as Virgil in his Aeneides, Plato, Lucian, 

Dantes, and others poetically describe it ? ' In Part iii (' Symptomes 

of Religious Melancholy ') he declares the account of Paradise in the 

Alcoran to be ' so ridiculous, that Virgil, Dantes, Lucian, nor any 

Poet can be more fabulous '. 

[The story referred to in the fifst passage appears to be a version of the 
anecdote related by Giovanni Sercambi, how Dante was placed at the 
lowest seat at an entertainment given by King Robert of Naples, on 
account of his shabby clothes.] 

Matthew Kellison, in The Right and Jurisdiction of the Prelate 

and the Prince, quotes (p. 268) sundry authors to prove that ' Dantes 

was after his death almost condemned of heresie ', and that he was 

' put in the Index amongst prohibited authors, and his book of 

Monarchie condemned ' ; and states that as a poet he does not deserve 

a hearing in a theological dispute. 

1622 
William Burton, in his Description of Leicestershire, says that 
Michael Drayton may compare with Dante, Petrarch, or Boccace. 

1624 

Lord Keeper Williams, in a letter to the Duke of Buckingham 

(March 2), quotes ' a Tale of Dante, the first Italian Poet of Note : 

who, being a great and wealthy Man in Florence, and his Opinion 

demanded, Who should be sent Embassador to the Pope ? made this 

Answer, that he knew not who ; Si jo vo, chi sta. Si jo sto, chi va ; 

If I go, I know not who shall stay at Home ; if I stay, I know not 

who can perform this Employment ' (printed in Cabala sive Scrinia 

Sacra, 1651). 

[The anecdote of Dante is related by Boccaccio in his Viia di Dante, in 
the chapter entitled ' Quality, e Difetti di Dante '.] 

1627 
Thomas James, in his Index Generalis Librorum Proliibitorutn 
a Pontificiis, registers the De Monarchia, the commentaries on the 
Divina Commedia of Landino and Vellutello, and the Commedia itself. 

1629 

John Milton writes his name in a volume containing a copy of the 

third edition (1529) of the Convivio, together with the works of 

Giovanni della Casa, and the sonnets of Benedetto Varchi. 

[This volume eventually passed into the Heber collection (see under 
1834-6).] 



14 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

c. 1680 
Sir Henry Wotton, in a List of Italian Authors selected and 
censured by Sir Hen. Wotton, includes II Dante col Commentario di 
Landino, vnih the note ' worth the studying '. 

[See Life and Letters of Sir Henry Wotton, ed. L. Pearsall Smith, Oxford, 
1907 (ii. 484 ff.)-] 

1632 
Henry Reynolds, in Mythomystes, prefers Tasso, Ariosto, and 
Marino above Dante. 

1633 
John Ford, in Love's Sacrifice, represents Mailruccio as saying, 
' Petrarch was a dunce, Dante a jig-maker, Sanazzar a goose, and 
Ariosto a puck-fist, to me ! ' (Act ii. Sc. 1). 

c. 1634 

John Milton, in Arcades, speaks of ' the smooth enamelled green ' 

(I. 84), in imitation (as is supposed) of Dante's ' il verde smalto ' 

(/«/. iv. 118). 

1634 

Milton, in Comus (11. 603-4), introduces a reminiscence (as is 
supposed) of Inf. iii. 52 ff. 

Simon Birckbek, in The Protestants Evidence, taken out of good 
Rec&rds, translates (in verse) Par. ix. 130-6 ; xviii. 127-9 ; x.xix. 
109-26 ; Inf. xix. 106-11 (pp. 58-60). 

1635 
Thomas Heywood, in Book vii of The Hierarchic of the Blessed 
Angells, quotes in the Italian text (woefully misprinted) Dante's 
description of Lucifer {Inf. xxxiv. 28-54) ; together with a para- 
phrase in English of Landino's commentary on the passage. 

[See Dante in English Literature, i. 129-32. This is the earliest specimen 
of any length of the Italian text of the Cmnmedia printed in England.] 

1636 
Edward Dacres, in MachiaveVs Discourses upon the First Decade 
of T. Livius, translates (in verse) Purg. vii. 121-3 ; and (also in verse) 

Conv. i. 11, 11. 58-4. 

c. 1637 
Milton, in his Commonplace Book, quotes, or refers to, Dante in 
connexion with the subjects of avarice {Inf. vii.), suicide {Inf. xiii.), 
sloth {Inf. iii.), the education of children {Par. viii. 142 ff.), usury 
{Inf. xi. 109 ff., with the commentary of Daniello), and religion in its 
relation to the state {Purg. xvi. 106-12, 127-9) ; under the heading 
Rex he appeals to the De Monorchia as evidence that Dante considered 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 15 

the authority of the King to be independent of the Pope ; and under 

Nobilitas he refers to Dante's canzone on the subject, prefixed to 

Book iv of the Convivio. 

[In connexion with the De Monarchia Milton refers to Boccaccio's account 
in his Vita di Dante of the burning of the book as an lieretical work by 
the Cardinal du Pouget, an account, he says, which was cut out by the 
Inquisitor from tlie last edition of the Vita, in which all mention of the 
treatise was suppressed. This remark proves incidentally that Milton 
was acquainted with the Vila Nuova, the editio princeps of which was 
published .at Florence in 1576 in the same volume as fifteen of Dante's 
canzotii, and the censorecj edition of Boccaccio's Vita (see Dante in English 
Literature, i. xxvi-vii, 122, n. 4).] 

1637 
MiLTOx, in Lyddas, introduces (11. 125-6, 128-9) reminiscences of 
Par. xxix. 106-7 ; xxvii. 55-6. 

Sir William Alexander, in his Doomes-day, refers to Florence as 
' a nursery of good wits ', tlie first among them being ' old Dante 
swolne with just disdaines '. 

1638 
Miltox, in a Latin letter from Florence to Benedetto Buonmattei 
(Sept. 10), mentions Dante and Petrarch among the Italian authors 
whom he read with delight. 

1639 
Eton College receives by bequest from Sir Henry Wotton, late 
Provost, two Cent. XV MSS. of the Divina Commedia, one with an 
Italian commentarv. 

c. 1640 
Luke Wadding, in his Annales Minorum, mentions {suh anno 1289) 
Dante's reference, ' cantico 12 de Paradiso ', to the rival sects in the 
Franciscan Order headed respectively by Matteo d'Acquasparta and 
Ubertino da Casale. 

1641 
Milton, in his tract Of Reformation touching Church Discipline 
in England, refers to Dante's condemnation of the Donation of 
Constantine in Inf. xix. 115-17 (which he renders ' in English blank 

verse ') and Par. xx. 55-7. 

1642 

Milton, in An Apology for Smectymnuus, refers to Dante and 
Petrarch as ' the two famous renowners of Beatrice and Laura '. 

1643 
Sir Kenelm Digby, in Observations upon Religio Medici, quotes 
in Italian an alleged saying of ' the Thuscan Virgil ' on love. 

[' The Thuscan Virgil ' can hardly be other than Dante, but the passage 
quoted is not to be found in Dante's works.] 



16 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

c. 1645 
George Daniel, in A Vindication of Poesie, says that tlie waters 
of Arno and Po shall cease to run when the fame of Dante and 
Ariosto is forgotten. 

1645 
George Wither, in TJie Great Assises holden in Parnassus, prefers 
Tasso above Dante and Petrarch. 

John Evelyn, in his Diary, mentions having seen a statue of 
Dante at Poggio Imperiale. 

c. 1646 
John Cleveland, in Tlie Rebel Scot, refers (as is supposed) to 
Dante as ' He that saw Hell in 's melancholy Dream '. 

1646 
Milton, in his sonnet To Mr. H. Lawes on his Airs, alluding to 
the episode {Purg. ii. 91 ff.) of Dante begging Casella to sing, tells 
Lawes that 

' Dante shall give Fame leave to set thee higher 
Than his Casella, whom he wooed to sing. 
Met in the milder shades of Purgatory.' 

[In the original draft of the sonnet, preserved among the MSS. at Trinity 
College, Cambridge, instead of the above lines, Milton wrote : 
' Fame, by the Tuscans leav, shall set thee higher 
Than old Casell, whom Dante won to sing. 
Met in the mildest shades of Purgatory.'] 

1648 
John Raymond, in An Itinerary contayning a Voyage made through 
Italy, in the Yeare 1646, and 1647, mentions the statue of Dante at 
Poggio Imperiale, and his tomb at Ravenna, the epitaph ujjon 
which (' Jura Monarchiae,' &c.) he transcribes. 

1650 
• .John Spencer, in his Catalogus Universalis Lihrorum Omnium in 
BibliothecaCollegii Sionii apud Londinenses, registers Dant. Aligherius. 
De necessitate Monarchiae. 

[This was doubtless an edition of the De Monorchia, which had been five 
times printed before this date, namely, at Basle in 1559 and 1566, at 
Strassburg in 1609 and 1618, and at Offenbach in 1610 ; but none of these 
editions bears the title given above.] 

1651 

Sir William D'Avenant, in the Preface to Gondibert : an Heroick 
Poem, refuses to admit Dante among the heroic poets. 

Thomas Stanley, in A Platonic Discourse upon Love, Written in 
Italian by John Picus Mirandula, translates (in verse) Canz. viii. 
52-3 {Com. iv). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 17 

1653 

Jeremy Taylor, in The Great Exemplar . . . the History of the Life 
and Death of the Ever-Blessed Jesus Christ, in Discourse xiv : ' Of 
the Miracles wrought by Jesus,' quotes and translates Dante's 
definition of miracles {Par. xxiv. 101-2). 

[This quotation was added, along with other ' additionals ', in this (the 
second) edition.] 

1655 
Thomas Fuller, in The Church History of Britain, quotes and 
translates Leland's epigram in which he compares Chaucer to Dante 
and Petrarch (see under c. 1542). 

1656 

Henry C.\rey, Earl of Monmouth, in Advertisements from Parnas- 
sus : in Two Centuries, describes in The XCVII Advertisement (after 
Boccalini in his Ragguagli di Parnaso) how ' Dante Alligieri being 
assaulted by night in his Country-house, and ill used by some 
disguised Vertuosi, is relieved by the great French Ronsard '. 

Edward Leigh, in A Treatise of Religion and Learning, and of 
Religious and Learned Men, reproduces biographical notices of 
Dante by Boissard, Masson, Raffaele Volterrano, Voetius, Heerebord, 
and Flaccus Illyricus. 

1658 

Sir Thomas Browne, in Hydriotaphia, Urne-Burial, quotes and 
explains Dante's description of the faces of the ' meagre and extenu- 
ated ' forms of the gluttons in Purgatory (Purg. xxiii. 31-3). 

1659 

James Howell, in his Lexicon Tetraglotton, An English-French- 

Italian-Spanish Dictionary, states, in the ' Address to the tru 

Philologer ', that the Italian tongue was first refined by Dante, 

Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Ariosto : in ' A Particular Vocabulary 

or Nomenclature To the Knowing Reader ', by a misquotation of 

Par. xxvi. 130-2, he credits Dante with the statement that ' art 
must co-operate with nature ' ; in a list of ' Proverbs touching 
Health ', in ' Italian Proverbs of the Choicest Sort ', he quotes and 
translates two in which the name of Dante is introduced. 

c. 1660 
Richard Lassels, in The Voyage of Italy, mentions the picture 
of Dante ' in a red gown ' (by Domenico di Michelino) in the Cathedral 
of Florence ; and among the learned men of Florence names ' Dante 
and Petrarch in Poetry '. 

C 



18 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1660 

Edmund Warcupp, in Italy, in its Original Glory, Ruine, and 
Revivall, mentions Dante as one of the ' excellent ingenuities ' of 
Florence ; and describes the ' magnificent tombe of Dante Algieri ' 
at Ravenna, giving a transcript of the two Latin epitaphs. 

William Winstanley, in England's Worthies, repeats Speght's 
account of Chaucer's having been fired to enrich and beautify the 
English tongue by the example of Dante and Petrarch (see under 
1598). 

1661 

Barten Holyday, in The Stirvey of the World, which consists of 
about a thousand disconnected couplets, says in No. 854, ' Heav'n, 
Purgatory, Hell, were Dante's three Themes '. 

Anthony Wood, in his Survey of the Antiquities of the City of 
Oxford, contrasts the Vicus Scholarum at Oxford with the Vicus 
Stramineus at Paris, ' where the philosophical! professors taught 
in the time of Dantes the poet ', the mention of Dante in this con- 
nexion being perhaps due to a reminiscence of the reference to the 
' Vico degli Strami ' in Par. x. 137. 

1663 
Edward Stillingfleet, in Book ii of his Origines Sacrae, quotes 
and translates, from a Latin translation of the Divi^ia Comniedia, 
Dante's answers to St. Peter concerning faith {Par. xxiv. 88-90, 
91-6), and concerning miracles {Par. xxiv. 100-2, 103-4). 

[As to the probable authorship of tlie translation, wliich StilUngfleet assigns 
to ' F. S.', see Athenaeum, Nov. 30, 1901.] 

1667 
Milton, in Paradise Lost, introduces numerous reminiscences of the 
Divina Comniedia. 

[For lists of parallel passages, see Dante in English Literature, i. 127-8, 
588-90.] 

1670 
Nicholas Lloyd, in his Dictionarium Historicum, includes 
' Dantes, poeta Florentinus, regum et principum amicitia clarus '. 

1671 
Sir Thomas Browne, in Christian Morals, refers to the men 
(viz. diviners), ' whose punishment in Dante's hell is to look ever- 
lastingly backward ' {Inf. xx. 11-15). 

[This passage, which does not occur in,the printed editions, comes from 
MS. Brit. Mus. Sloane. 1847.] 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 19 

1672 
Sir Thomas Browne, in A Letter to a Friend, upon occasion of 
the Death of his intimate Friend, in reference to the ' remarkable 
Extenuation ' of the deceased, says (in § 9), 'I never more Uvely 
beheld the starved Characters of Dante in any living Face ', the 
allusion being to the description of the gluttons in Purgatory [Purg. 
xxiii. 31-3) (see also vuider 1638) ; in § 21 he quotes Dante as an 
instance of ' how unhappy great Poets have been in versifying their 
own Epitaphs '. 

[The epitaph referred to is that beginning ' Jura Monarchiae ', whicli was 
tormerly supposed to have Ijeen written by Dante himself, but is now held 
to have been composed by Bernardo Canaccio, some thirty years after 
Dante's death.] 

Sir Thomas Browne, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica, in connexion with 

the belief ' that John the Evangelist should not die ', refers to the 

episode of ' the learned Italian Poet Dante, in his Poetical survey 

of Paradise, meeting with the soul of St. John, and desiring to see 

his body ', and quotes and paraphrases St. John's reply {Par. xxv. 

124-6). 

[This passage was first added in the sixth edition (1672) of this work, which 
was originally published in 1646.] 

1673 
Barten Holyday, in the notes to his translation of Juvenal 
(published after his death), quotes the stricture of Nogarola upon 
Dante, who, he says, was wanting in ' elegant words '. 

John Ray, in Observations . . . made on a Journey through . . . 
Germany, Italy, and France, mentions the picture of Dante in the 
Cathedral at Florence, and quotes the Latin verses inscribed upon it ; 
he also describes the tomb of Dante at Ravenna, and quotes the two 
Latin inscriptions. 

1674 
Thomas Hyde, in his Catalogus Impressorum Librorum Biblio- 
thecae Bodleianae, registers four editions of the Divina Commedia, 
five of the De Monarchia, including the editio princeps (1559), and 
one of the Convivio. 

[The Convivio, of winch this is the fourth edition (Ven. 1531), now appears 
tor the first time in the Bodleian Catalogues.] 

In Rapin's Reflections on Aristotle's Treatise of Poesie, ' made 
English ' by Thomas Rymer, Dante is condemned as lacking in fire, 
hard to understand, wanting in modesty, and too profound. 

J. Smith, in hisGrammatica Quadrilinguis, mentions Guarino, Dante. 
Torquato Tasso, and Bembo, among the boasts of the Italian tongue. 

c2 



20 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1675 

Henry Neville, in The Discourses of Nicholas Machiavel upon 
the First Decade of Titus Livius, quotes and translates (in verse) 
Purg. vii. 121-3 ; and (also in verse) Conv. i. 11, 11. 53-4. 

Edward Phillips, in his Theatrum Poetarum, includes ' Dantes 
Aligerus, a most Renowned Florentine, and the first of Italian 
Poets of any Fame or Note for Vernacular Verse ' ; and says, ' that 
which most proclaims his Fame to the World is his Triple Poem 
entitled Paradice, Purgatory and Hell ' — an account which he 
repeats (in Latin) in his Compendiosa Enumeratio Poetarum qui 
a tempore Dantis Aligerii usque ad hanc aetatem claruerunt (1679). 

1684 
John Dryden, in his verses prefixed to the Earl of Roscommon's 
Essay on Translated Verse, speaks of ' Dante's polish'd page ', 
which ' Restor'd a silver, not a golden age '. 

1685 

Dryden, in the Preface to his Albion and Albanius, says that the 
Italian language ' has in a manner been refined and purified from 
the Gothic ever since the time of Dante, which is above four hundred 
years ago '. 

William Aglionby, in his PaiiUing Illustrated in Three Dialogues. 
in ' The Life of Cimabue ', quotes Purg. xi. 94-6 as evidence that the 
fame of Cimabue was eclipsed by that of Giotto ; in ' The Life of 
Ghiotto ', he says that Giotto ' amongst the rest, drew Dante 
Alighieri, the famous Poet of those Times, and his Intimate Friend, 
as may be seen in that Chappel of the Palace of the Podesta of 
Florence ' ; and mentions that some of Giotto's frescoes ' are 
thought to be the Invention of the Poet Dante ' ; in ' The Life of 
Raphael ' he mentions that artist's inclusion of the figure of ' the 
most Divine Dante ' in his fresco of Parnassus in the Vatican. 

Sir Paul Rycaut, in The Lives of the Popes, from the Latin of 
Platina, records the exile of Dante from Florence in the time of 
Boniface VIII, and his rebuke of the Florentines for their foolish 
answer to the Emperor Henry VII when Clement V was Pope. 

1687 
William Winstanley, in Lives of the most Famous English 
Poets, in the account of Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder, quotes 
Leland's epigram comparing him to Dante and Petrarch (see under 
1542). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 21 

1690 

Sir Thomas Pope Blount, in Censura Celebriorum Aiithorum, 
quotes the remarks of fifteen authors, for the most part in Latin, 
upon Dante, and mentions the commentaries of Landino and 
Vellutello on the Divina Covimedia. 

1693 
Thomas Rymer, in A Short View of Tragedy, says of Folquet of 
Marseilles, whom he styles a ' Provencial Jester ', that ' Dante has 
him in his Paradise ' {Par. ix. 94) ; in connexion with Raymond, 
Count of Provence, he quotes and translates Par. vi. 133-4 ; in 
a comparative view of Proven9al, English, and Italian, he says 
that the reformation of the last ' was begun and finished well nigh 
at the same time by Boccace, Dante, and Petrarch ' ; in connexion 
with Hugh Capet he quotes Purg. xx. 49-52. 

1694 
Sir Thomas Pope Blount, in De Re Poetica : or. Remarks upon 
Poetry, quotes sundry notices of Dante, and refers to his condemna- 
tion as a heretic on account of his ' Opusculum de Monarchia ', 

1695 
Francis jMaximilian Misson, in A New Voyage to Italy, says he 
visited the tomb of Dante at Ravenna, and transcribed the epitaphs, 
' principally for the Curiosity of the Rliimes '. 

1697 

Dryden, in his Dedication of the Aeneis, refers to the murder of 
Caesar by Brutus, ' whom I neither dare commend, nor can justly 
blame (though Dante, in his Inferno, has put him and Cassius, and 
Judas Iscariot betwixt them, into the great Devil's mouth) ' {Inf. 
xxxiv. 61-7). 

Edward Bernard, in his Catalogi Lihrorum Manuscriptorum 

Angliae et Hiberniae, registers a MS. of Dante at Westminster Abbey 

(' Comedie di Dante D'Algieri, viz. Inferno, Purgatorio, Cielo ') ; 

and two at Eton (' Dante, an Italian Poet, fol.' and ' An Italian 

Comment on his Poem, foV). 

[It is noteworthy that at this date there was no MS. of Dante in any of 
the libraries at Oxford or Cambridge. The two Eton MSS. were those 
bequeatiied by Sir Henry Wotton in 1639.] 

William Wotton, in his Reflections upon Ancient and Modern 
Learning, says ' it is still disputed among the Criticks of the Italian 
Language, whether Dante, Boccace, Petrarch, and Villani, who were 



22 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 697^c oiitinued. 
all Contemporaries, are not the Valuablest as well as the Aneieiitest 
Authors they have ' (in Chap, iii, ' Of Ancient and Modern Eloquence 
and Poesie '). 

[This passage docs not occur in the first edition (1694).] 

c. 1697-1700 
Charles Spencer, afterwards (1702) third Earl of Sunderland, 
forms what Evelyn described as his ' incomparable library ' at 
Althorp, which was reckoned to be ' the finest in Europe ', and 
contained a large number of rare editions of the works of Dante 
(see under 1882). 

c. 1700 

Henry Trench, an historical painter, brings to England from 

Italy a bas-relief (attributed to Michael Angelo, but more probably 

by Pierino da Vinci) representing the tragedy of Ugolino and his 

children as related by Dante in Inferno xxxiii. 

[Vasari, in his ' Life of Pierino da Vinei ', states that Pierino made a 
basso-relievo of tliis subject in wax, and afterwards cast it in bronze. 
What is believed to be the original wax design is now in the Ashmolean 
Museum at Oxford, where there is also a plaster cast of the bas-relief. 
This wax bas-relief was in the collection of William Hoare, R.A., the 
portrait painter (1706-92), and afterwards in that of his son. Prince Hoare 
(1755-1834), whence it passed to Philip Bury Duncan, Keeper of the 
Ashmolean Museum (1826-55), by whom it was presented to the Vniver- 
sity in 1841. An engraving of the original bas-relief (as is supposed) in 
the Casa Gherardesca at Florence is among the illustrations (Plate CI) 
of the Vernon Dante (see The Earliest English Illustrators of Dante, in 
Quarterly Revieiv, Oct. 1909).] 

1700 
Dryden, in the Preface to Fables, Ancient and Modern, translated 
into Verse, in a comparison of Chaucer Avith Boccaccio, states that 
' among other things, they have this in common, that they refined 
their mother-tongues ; but with this difference, that Dante had 
begun to file their language, at least in verse, before the time of 
Boccace '. 

Cent. XVIII 

1701 
E. Veryard, in An Account of ... a Journey through the Low 
Countries, France, Italy, etc., mentions Dante's tomb at Ravenna 
and the picture of him in the Cathedral at Florence, and gives 
a transcript of the two Latin epitaphs on the tomb and of the verses 
on the picture. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 28 

1702 
Thomas Brown, in his Letters from the Dead to the Living, mentions 
Homer, Virf^il, Dante, and Quevedo, among those who had given 
an account of Hell before him. 

1705 

Jeremy Collier, in A Supplement to the Great Historical, Geographi- 
cal, Genealogical and Poetical Dictionary, gives a sketch of the life 
of Dante, based on Villani, Petrarch, Paulus Jovius, &c. 

1707 

In TIw Muses Mercury Dante is mentioned as ' the first that 
got any great Reputation in Europe in writing in Verse, in his own 
Tongue '. 

1709 

William King, in Tlie AH of Love, includes Dante among the 
singers of the Trojan War, which he speaks of as ' that Pother, 
Of which old Homer, Virgil, Dant, And Chaucer make us such 
a Cant ' (11. 654-6). 
* 1710 

Michael de la Roche, in Memoirs of Literature for June, trans- 
lates extracts from Gravina's discussion in Delia Bagion Poetica 
as to whether Dante wrote in the Florentine dialect, and as to the 
nature and design of the Divina Corn-media. 

In the Catalogue of the Libraries of the learned Sir T. Brown and 

Dr. Edw. Brown, his Son, are registered the first Aldine (Ven. 1502) 

edition of the Commedia, and the second of the editions with the 

commentaries of Landuio and Vellutello {Ven. 1578). 

[The ' learned Sir T. Brown ' was Sir Thomas Browne, author of Religio 
Media ; for his references to Dante, see under 1638, 1671, 1672.] 

c. 1712 
Alexander Pope, in his versification of Donne's Fourth Satire, 
points Donne's reference to him ' who dreamt he saw hell ', by the 
mention (1. 192) of Dante by name (see under c. 1600). 

1712 
Michael de la Roche, in Memoirs of Literature (Art. Ixxi), 
translates a letter from Scipioiie Maffei to Apostolo Zeno in which 
an account is given of an old French translation of the Divina 
Commedia among the MSS. in the library of the Duke of Savoy at 
Turin, and of a copy of Brunetto Latini's Tresor, in connexion with 
which Dante's reference in Irif. xv. 119-20 is quoted. 

[The MS. of tlie French translation of the Commedia (which was printed 
in 1897 at Paris) was destroyed in tlic fire at Turin University in 1900.] 



24 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1715 
George I presents to Cambridge University Library the books 
and MSS. of the late Bishop of Ely (John Moore), among which were 
three MSS. of the Commedia, one of Cent. XIV and two of Cent. XV. 

c. 1716-18 

Thomas Coke of Holkham, afterwards (1744) Earl of Leicester, 
purchases in Italy, for the Library at Holkham, six MSS. of the 
Commedia, two of Cent. XIV and four of Cent. XV ; also a Cent. XV 
MS. of the Convivio. 

1719 

Jonathan Richardson, in A Discourse on tlie Dignity, Certainty, 
Pleasure and Advantage, of the Science of a Connoisseur, gives an 
account of Dante, and translates in blank verse the Ugolino episode 
from Inf. xxxiii. 1-78. 

1722 

Jonathan Richardson the Younger, in An Account of some of 
the Statues, Bas-Reliefs, Drawings and Pictures in Italy, mentions 
the picture of Dante in the Cathedral of Florence (which he ascribes 
to Orcagna), and refers to a drawing of Dante in his father's pos- 
session. 

1726 

John Durrant Breval, in Remarks on Several Parts of Europe 
. , . Collected upon the Spot in several Tours since the year 1723, records 
his visit to Pisa, where he went to see ' the Torre di Fame, remarkable 
for the disastrous End of Count Ugolin and his four or five Sons, 
pathetically described by the great Dante '. 

1728 
Paolo Rolli, in Remarks upon M. Voltaire's Essay on tlie Epick 
Poetry of the Europeati Nations, ridicules Voltaire's ignorance of 
Italian literature, especially as regards the age of Dante. 

1730 

Edward Wright, in Some Observations made in travelling through 
France, Italy, etc., in tlie years 1720, 1721, and 1722, mentions the 
picture of Dante in the Cathedral of Florence, and translates in 
verse the Latin inscription ; he also states that he had heard that 
' this great man had a most unhappy itch of pilfering '. 

Andrew Michael Ramsay, in Remarks upon Italian Poets 
(recorded in Spence's Anecdotes), observes that Dante, Petrarch, and 
Ariosto ' are full of surprisingly great and little things '. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 25 

1731 

In an article on Hardoiiin's ' Doutes sur I'age du Dante ', in 
The Present State of the Rejmblick of Letters, it is claimed that ' Dante 
was a Scholar and a Poet, far above the times he liv'd in, and well 
deserves a place among the ancient fine writers '. 

Charles Lamotte, in An Essay on Poetry and Painting, in the 
same, says ' Painters maj'' borrow noble hints from the Poets, 
Ghiotto us'd to take hints from Dante '. 

1734 
Jonathan" Richardson, Father and Son, in their Explanatory 
Notes and Remarks on Milton's Paradise Lost, give sundry instances 
of Milton's indebtedness to Dante. 

1735 

Pierre Desmaizeaux, in the article on Dante in his English 
edition of Bayle's Dictionnaire Historique et Critique, translates 
(in verse) Inf. xv. 73-8, 79-87 ; xix. 106-11 ; Purg. xvi. 127-9 ; 
XX. 43-5; xxiii. 91-102: Par. v. 73-8; x. 133-8; xvii. 70-5; 
and the epitaph (' Jura Monarchiae ') on Dante's tomb. 

Thomas Blackwell, in An Enquiry into the Life and Writings of 
Homer, states his opinion that 'Dante made, the strongest Draught 
of Men and their Passions, that stands in the records of Modern 
Poetrv '. 

c. 1737 

Thomas Gray translates (in blank verse) the Ugolino episode 
from Inf. xxxiii. 1-77. 

[See Dante in English Literature, i. 231-4.] 

1740 
Francis Peck, in New Memoirs of the Life and Poetical Works of John 
Milton, draws attention to Milton's indebtedness to Dante in Lycidas. 

1744 
Mark Akenside, in Book ii of The Pleasures of the Imagination, 
indicates Florence, ' the birth-place of Dante and Boccaccio ', by 
the mention of the Arno. 

1744-5 
In the Cotalogus Bibliothecae Harleianae are registered eight 
editions of the Commedia, and one of Trissino's translation of the 
De Vulgari Eloquentia. 

c. 1745 
Hon. Elizabeth Yorke : copy of ' Portrait of Dante by Julio 
Clovio '. 



26 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

c. 17J-5 — continued. 
Hon. Charles Yorke : Ode to the Hon. Miss Yorke on her copy- 
ing a Portrait of Dante by Clovio. 

[See Dante in English Literature, i. 243-5.] 

1745 

Catherine Talbot, in letter to Elizabeth Carter (July 29), speak- 
ing of Dante, says she can see ' amazing strokes of beauty in several 
passages ', but has as yet no comprehension of the whole, and asks 
her to send ' a sketch of his seven circles of Inferno ' ; Mrs, Carter 
replies (Aug. 8), that she too found Dante much beyond her com- 
prehension, and wonders that she was ever able to make out one 
single line. 

1746 

Joseph Spence contributes anonymously to Dodsley's Museum 

(No. ii) a free rendering of Inf. xxiv. 1-18 ('The three first stanzas 

of the 24th Canto of Dante's Inferno made into a Song. In imitation 

of the Earl of Surry's stile '). 

[The autliorship is assigned to Spence by Joseph Warton in his Works of 
Pope (1797), vol. iv, p. 283.] 

Mark Akenside, in Tlie Ballance of Poets, published in Dodsley's 
Museum (No. xix), estimates Dante's place among ' the greater 
Names of Poetry '. 

c. 1749 

Robert Thyer, in Annotations on MiUon, jjoints out Milton's 
imitation oi Inf. iy. 7-9 in Paradise Lost viii. 240-4. 

1749 
Thomas Newton, in his edition of Paradise Lost, ' with notes of 
various authors ', notes the parallel between Inf. xxiv. 1-15 and 
P. L. ii. 488-95. 

1750 
Thomas Gray, in the first line of his Elegy written in a Country 
Church-Yard, echoes Purg. viii. 5-6, as he records in a note. 

1751 
Earl of Chesterfield, in letter to Philip Stanhope (Feb. 8), states 
that he was ' fully convinced that Dante was not worth the pains 
necessary to understand him '. 

1753 
Countess of Oxford sells to the nation the Harley collection of 
MSS., including five of the Commedia, one of Cent. XIV and four 
of Cent. XV. * 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 27 

Horace Mann, in letter to Horace Walpole (Dec. C), quotes 
(incorrectly) Dante's abusive description of the Florentines {Inf. 
XV. 68). 

Giuseppe Baretti, in his Dissertation upon the Italian Poetry, 
gives a lengthy appreciation of Dante, and translates (in prose) 
sundry passages from the Commedia, including the Ugolino episode 
{Inf. xxxiii. 37-78). 

John Northall, in Travels through Italy, records an alleged 
portrait of Dante by Perugino in the Uffizi at Florence, mentions 
the picture of him in the cathedral, and the so-called ' sasso di 
Dante ', and describes him as ' the pjuiius, or Chaucer, of Florence '. 

1754 

In Bibliotheca Meadiana, the catalogue of the library of Dr. Richard 
Mead, are registered seven editions of the Commedia (three of Cent. 
XV and four of Cent. XVI), and the editio princeps (1490) of the 
Convivio. 

Earl of Cork, in letter from Florence to John Duncombe (Dec. 31), 
mentions Dante as one of the founders of the Italian language. 

Thomas Warton, in Observations on ilie Fairy Queen of Spenser, 

refers to Dante's ignorance of Homer, and suggests that for his 

idea of an inscription over the gate of hell he was indebted to books 

of chivalry. 

c. 1756 

Joseph Warton, in an intended addition to his Ode to Fancy, 

introduces ' powerful Dante ', and ' the silent towers where pine 

The sons of famish'd Ugoline '. 

[See Mitford's Works of Gray (1810), ii. 180.] ' 

1756 
Joseph Warton, in vol. i of his Essay on the Genius and Writings 
of Pope, speaks of the Commedia as a ' sublime and original poem, 
which is a kind of satirical epic ', and gives a prose translation of the 
Ugolino episode {Inf. xxxiii. 43-75). 

1757 

Baretti, in The Italian Library, gives an account of Dante, 
and as specimens of the Commedia prints Inf. vi. 1-33 ; Pitrg. viii. 
1-18 : Par. xxxiii. 1-27. 

f. 1758 

William Hogarth : portrait of William Huggins as the translator 

of Ariosto and Dante. 

[This portrait was engraved by Thomas Major to serve as frontispiece for 
Huggins's translation of the Comniedia (sec under 1760).] 



28 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1758 
John Upton, in his edition of Spenser's Faerie Queene, points out 
numerous parallels between Spenser and Dante. 

1759 

In the Catalogue of the Harleian Collection of MSS. in the British 
Museum are registered the five MSS. of Dante {Harl. 3188, 3459, 
3460, 8513, 3581) purchased with the rest from the Countess of 
Oxford in 1753. 

Oliver Goldsmith, in An Enquiry into the Present State of Polite 
Learning in Europe, in an estimate of Dante's place in literature, 
says ' he addressed a barbarous people in a method suited to tlieir 
apprehensions ', and that ' he owes most of his reputation to the 
obscurity' of the times in which he lived '. 

1760 

William Huggins prints anonymously in the British Magazine 

a verse translation of Purg. xi. 1-21. 

[At his death in 1761 Huggins left in MS. a complete translation of the 
Commedia, with directions that it should be published, but this was never 
done (see Danie in English Literature, i. 307).] 

Lord Lyttelton, in Dialogues of the Dead (No. xiv), makes Pope 
blame Dante for ' confoiuidinj; the Christian with the Pagan 
theology '. 

1760-1 

Gray, in Observations on English Metre, and onthePseudo-Bht/thmus, 
quotes several passages frorp Dante's De Vulgari Eloquentia, this 
being the earliest evidence of any acquaintance with that treatise 
on the part of an English writer. 

c. 1761 
Edward Gibbon, in Outlines of the History of the World, says 
' the writings of Dante, Boccace, and Petrarch, for ever fixed the 
Italian language. The first displayed the powers of a wild and original 
genius ' (in Misc. Works, 1796, iii. 190). 

[See Modern Language lievieiv, vi. 518-19.] 

1761 

Notice of Dante (in A Neiv and General Biographical Dictionary ; 
containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and 
Writings of the most Eminent Persons in every Nation). 

Charles Burney, as recorded by Mme. d'Arblay in Memoirs 
of Dr. Burney, makes a prose translation of the Inferno (see under 
1832). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 29 

1762 

Ellis Farneworth, in translation of Machiavelli's Political Dis- 
courses upon the first decade ofLivy, renders in verse Purg. vii. 121-3, 
and (also in verse) Conv. i. 11, 11. 53-4. 

1764 

In ' Remarks on Simplicity in Writing ', in Annual Register, the 
simplicity of Dante's style is assigned as the chief cause of his pre- 
eminence as a poet. 

In ' An Essay on Painting ', in Annual Register, an account is 
given of how Michael Angelo illustrated a copy of the first edition 
of the Divina Commedia with the commentary of Landino (Florence, 
1481), and of how ' this inestimable volume ' was lost at sea. 

1766 
Samuel Sharp, in Letters from Italy, writing from Florence 
(May 2), quotes Dante's remark {Vulg. Eloq., i. 13) as to the harsh 
pronunciation of the Tuscans. 

1768 

Baretti, in An Account of the Manners and Customs of Italy, 
states, after Sacchetti, ' that the common people of Florence used 
commonly to sing the poem of Dante about the streets, even during 
the life of the poet '. 

1769 

Gray, in his account of the overhanging rocks on ' Gowder 
crag ', in his Journal in the Lakes (Oct. 3), quotes Dante's line, 
' Non ragioniam di lor ; ma guarda e passa ' {Inf. iii. 51). 

Owen Ruffhead, in Life of Alexander Pope, gives Pope's scheme 
of classification of the English poets into four schools, the last being 
the ' School of Dante '. 

1770 

Gray, in letter from Cambridge to Thomas Warton (April 15) 
communicates his scheme for a History of English Poetry, in which 
he mentions ' the first Italian School, commonly called the Sicilian, 
. . . brought to perfection by Dante, Petrarch, Boccace, and others '. 

Matthew Pilkixgton, in The Gentleman's and Connoisseur's 
Dictionary of Painters, in his notice of Botticelli, mentions his 
drawings to illustrate the Commedia, which were engraved by 
Baccio Baldini for the first Florentine edition (1481) with the 
commentary of Landino. 

1771 

Charles Burxey, in The Present State of Music in France and 
Italy, quotes Purg. ii. 113-14 (adapted) as motto on title-page. 



30 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1771 — continued. 
and mentions Dante's references to the organ {Purg. ix. 144 ; Par. 
xvii. 44) and lute (Inf. xxx. 49), and to the musician Casella {Purg. 

ii. 91-117). 

1772 

Eari^ of Carlisle : Translation from Dante, Canto xxxiii (the 

Ugolino episode from Inf. xxxiii. 1-75, in verse). 

[This translation was published, with other poems, in the following year.] 

1773 
Samuel Johnson, as recorded by Boswell, remarks on the simi- 
larity between the opening of Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and that 
of the Commedia. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds : oil painting of ' Count Hugolino and his 
Children in the dungeon, as described by Dante, in the thirty-third 
canto of the Inferno '. (R.A., No. 243.) 

[This picture, which is believed to be the first easel-picture ever painted 
of a subject from Dante, was engraved in mezzotint by Jolin Dixon in 
1774, and in line by Raimbach in 1811. The subject is said to have been 
suggested to Reynolds by Burke or Goldsmith (see Dante in English 
Literature, i. 342-3).] 

1774 

Thomas Warton, in vol. i of his History of English Poetry, states 
that the progress of poetry may be traced to its perfection from 
' the Provencial bards . . . through John de Meun in France, Dante 
in Italy, and Chaucer in England '. 

John Dixon : engraving of Sir Joshua Reynolds's ' Ugolino ' 

(R.A.. 1773). 

1775 

In Bibliotheca Askeviana, the catalogue of the library of Anthony 

Askew, are registered a MS. (now Lansd. 839 in Brit. Mus.) and three 

early printed editions of the Commedia. 

1775-8 

William Julius Mickle, in the notes to his translation of the 
Lusiad, points out parallels between Camoens and Dante. 

Thomas Tyrwhitt, in his edition of The Canterbury Tales of 
Chaucer, quotes illustrative passages from the Commedia, Vita 
Nuova, De Vulgari Eloquentia, and Canzoniere of Dante. 

1776 
Sir John Hawkins, in his History of Music, quotes Dante's refer- 
ence (Par. vi. 127-42) to the story of Raymond Berenger and 
Romeo. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 31 

1777 
Henry Fuseli : six drawings of subjects from the Divina Com- 
media in monochrome, viz. ' Paolo and Francesca ' (//!/. v. 74-5) ; 
' Dante, Farinata, and Cavalcante ' {Inf. x. 22 ff.) ; ' Lano and 
Jacomo da Sant' Andrea ' {Inf. xiii. 109-29) ; ' Dante listening to 
the tale of Ugolino ' {//;/. xxxii-iii) ; ' Belacqua and his companions ' 
{Purg. iv. 103-23) ; ' The fate of Buonconte da Montefeltro ' {Purg. 
V. 94-129). 

[These drawings are now in the Print Room at the British Museum.] 

1778 

Thomas Warton, in vol. ii of his History of English Poetry, speaks 
of Dante's indebtedness to the troubadours, and mentions the refer- 
ences to Dante in Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate. 

James Beattie, in Essay on Poetry and Music, refers to the popular 
belief in Italy that Darite visited Hell. 

William Hayley, in the First Epistle of his Essay on Painting, 
describes Salvator Rosa as giving ' th' historic scene a charm as 
strong As the terrific gloom of Dante's song '. 

Axox. : oil painting of ' Francesca and Paolo : a story from the 
Inferno of Dante '. (Soc. of Artists of Great Britain, No. 156.) 

1779, 

Hon. Daines Barrington, in Observations on the Earliest httro- 
duction of Clocks, claims that Dante was the first author to mention 
striking clocks, and quotes Par. x. 139-41. 

Notice of Dante (in vol. iv of Encyclopaedia Britannica). 

c. 1780 
John Bowle, in Annotations on Milton, quotes sundry parallels 
between Milton and Dante. 

[See Dante in English Literature, i. 372^.] 

^1780 

James Harris, in Philological Enquiries, describes Dante, Petrarch, 
and Boccaccio as being ' not only strong and powerful in sentiment, 
but what is more surprising, elegant in their diction, at a time when 
the languages of England and France were barbarous and un- 
polished '. 

Martin Sherlock, in Letters from an English Traveller, while 
allowing that ' Horace, Longinus, and Boileau, woidd have been 
charmed with the beauties of Dante and Ariosto, taken from nature, 



d2 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 780 — c ontinued. 

and founded on truth', holds that 'they would have condemned 

the whole of these two poems, as being contrary to reason, good 

sense, and consequently to good taste '. 

[These letters were originally piiblished by Slierlock in French in 1779 ; 
they were translated into English by John Duneombe.] 

1781 

Thomas Warton, in vol. iii of his History of English Poetry, 
includes a lengthy ' general view ' of the Commedia, from which he 
quotes numerous passages in the original, giving a prose translation 
of the inscription over the Gate of Hell {Inf. iii. 1-9), and of the 
Ugolino episode (Inf. xxxiii. 13-75). 

William Hayley, in his Triumphs of Temper, quotes as motto 
Inf. ix. 61-3 ; and introduces imitations of several passages from 
Inf. iii, including the inscription over the Garte of Hell. 

John Bowle, in the catalogue of whose library are registered the 
very rare editio princeps of the De Vulgari Eloquentia (Paris, 1577) 
and six editions of the Commedia, quotes sundry passages from the 
Inferno, with the comments of Landino and Daniello, in his Artota- 
ciones a la Historia de Don Quixote de la Manclia. 

Martin Sherlock, in Original Letters on several Subjects, says that 
Longinus ' would have condemned to the flames that " monstrum 
horrendum, informe, ingens ", the Divina Commedia ', but ' would 
have read some of its verses with transport, and on perusing the 
Canto of Count Ugolino, would have exclaimed, " Homer has nothing 
so sublime ! " ' 

George Selwyn, in letter to the Earl of Carlisle, speaks of 
Gloucester as having been to him ' truly a citta dolente ' (Inf. iii. 1). 

Johnson, in his Life of Gray, criticizing the ' Progress of Poesy '. 
says, ' in the time of Dante and Petrarch, from whom he derives our 
first school of poetry, Italy was overrun by tyrant power and coward 
vice.^ 

In the Annual Register, in a notice of Warton's History of English 
Poetry, referring to his comparison of Sackville's Descent into Hell 
with Dante's Inferno, it is stated that, ' In treating the softer passions 
Dante is incomparable : his descriptions are the most natural and 
graceful that can be conceived, and tinctured with a degree of 
sentiment and refinement not easily to be found in the best classical 
authors.' 

In Bibliotheca Beauclerkiana, the catalogue of the library of 
Topham Beauclerk, are registered several editions of the Commedia, 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 33 

including the first Florentine edition (1481), and the French transla- 
tion by Grangier (1596). 

James Robson, London bookseller, offers for sale a MS. (incom- 
plete) of Gio\-anni da Serravalle's Latin commentary on the 
Commedia. 

[This MS., one of the only fonr known, passed into the Wodhull collection 
in 1811 (see under tliat year), and eventually (in 1886) into the British 
Museum (Egerton 2620).] 

1782 

William Hayley, in the First Epistle of his Essay on Epic Foeiry, 
devotes fifty lines to Dante and the Commedia, and quotes (in a note) 
Virgil's farewell words to Dante {Purg. xxvii. 139-41) ; in the notes 
to the Third Epistle he prints a sonnet in imitation of Dante's sonnet 
to Guido Cavalcanti {Son. xxxii. ' Guido, vorrei '), and quotes and 
translates (in ' triple rhyme ') the first three cantos of the Inferno, 
this being the first printed English translation of any considerable 
portion of the Commedia, beyond a mere episode, and the first 
attempt in English to translate Dante in the metre of the original. 

Joseph Warton, in vol. ii. of his Essay on the Genius and Writings 
of Pope, mentions Sacchetti's anecdotes of Dante, and quotes 
Manetti's description of Dante's personal appearance. 

Charles Burney, in vol. ii. of his History of Music, quotes and 
translates (in verse) the episode of Casella (Purg. ii. 73-92, 106-17). 

Horace Walpole, in letter to William Mason (June 25), charac- 
terizes Dante as ' extravagant, absurd, disgusting, in short a Method- 
ist parson in Bedlam '. 

Charles Rogers : The Inferno of Dante Translated (Lond.) ; in 
blank verse, anonymous — the first complete (printed) English trans- 
lation of any cantica of the Commedia. 

1783 

James Beattie, in Dissertations Moral and Critical, in an estimate 
of the Commedia, says, ' many of the poetical descriptions and 
allegories are highly finished, and in particular passages enforced 
with singular energy and simplicity of expression.' 

John' Hoole, in the notes to his translation of Orlando Furioso, 
points out parallels between Ariosto and Dante ; and, in the notes 
to the fifth edition of his translation of Tasso's Gerusaletnme Liberata, 
quotes Dante's description of the nine Celestial Orders (Par. xviii. 
16-18, 25-36). 

WiLLtA.M l^ECKFoun, in Letters from Various Parts of Europe, 
mentions a picture at Florence by Poelemburg of Virgil and Dante 

D 



84 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1788 — continued. 
entering Hell, and describes the frescoes in the Campo Santo at Pisa 
as ' strange paintings of hell and the devil, mostly taken from Dante's 
rhapsodies '. 

1784 
In Criticisms on tlie Rolliad the poet of the Bolliad is contrasted 
with Dante. 

1785 
Thomas Warton, in his edition of Milton's Minor Poems, applies 
Dante's description of Homer {Inf. iv. 95) to Milton, and quotes 
(from V.E. ii. 4) Dante's remarks on the Canzone. 

Henry Boyd : A translation of the Inferno of Dante Alighieri, 
in English Verse. With Historical Notes, and the Life of Dante. 
(Dublin, 2 vols.) 

[Reviewed in Gentleman's Magazine (May) ; Critical Review (June) ; and 
Monthly Review (Dec.).] 

William Parsons : The Story of Francesca from the fifth canto 
of Dante's Inferno (including a verse paraphrase of Inf. v. 26 ff.) 
(in The Florence Miscellany, pp. 116 ff.). 

Anna Seward, in letter to Helen Williams (Aug. 25), speaks of the 
' weary horror ' of Dante's Inferno, and remarks that ' the Dantean 
Angel of Vengeance is diabolically insatiable '. 

John Pinkerton, in a comparative estimate of Dante and 
Petrarch in Letters of Literature, describes Dante as ' a bold original 
writer, whose beauties are peculiarly his own, while his faults are 
those of the times '. 

Christopher Hervey, in Letters from Portugal, Spain, Italy, and 
Germany, quotes and translates Dante's reference to the Monte San 
Giuliano {Inf. xxxiii. 30). 

1786 

John Horne Tooke, in The Diversions of Purley, quotes Dante's 
use of ca for casa (in Inf. xv. 54), and of scotto (in Purg. xxx. 144). 

Samuel Henley, in the notes to his English translation of Beck- 
ford's Vathek, remarks that Don Quixote's ' mistake of the windmills 
for Giants 'was probably suggested to Cervantes by Dante's simile 
in Inf. xxxiv. 6 ff. 

Henry Fuseli : oil painting of ' Francesca and Paolo : Dante's 
Inferno, Canto V. (R.A., No. 53.) 

c. 1788 
Walter Scott records, in the ' Memoir of his Early Life ', that 
about this time he became intimate ' with the works of Dante, 
Boiardo, Pulci, and other eminent Italian authors '. 



ft 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 85 

1788 

Gibbon, in vol. vi. of the DecKne and Fall of the Roman Empire, 
speaks of ' the original wildness of Dante ', whose poem he rates 
far above the ' tedious uniformity ' of Petrarch's rhymes. 

Anna Seward, in letters to W. B. Stevens (March 10), and 
Dr. Gregory (Oct. 30), discusses the question of Milton's indebtedness 
to Dante. 

George Sidney : oil painting (at Rome) of ' Count Ugolino ii) the 
Tower of Famine at Pisa ' {Inf. xxxiii. 52 ff.). 

[An account of tliis picture, all trace of which has now been lost, appeared 
in the Giornale delle Belle Arti for April 26, 1788.] 

1789 

Thomas Twining, in the notes to his translation of Aristotle's 
Treatise on Poetry, quotes Inf. iii. 22-3, 25-7, as a fine example of 
Dante's force of representation of sound. 

Hester Lynch Piozzi, in Observations and Reflections made in the 
course of a Journey through France, Italy, and Germany, contrasts 
Dante and Milton with Tasso and Pope. 

Hannah More, in letter to Horace Walpole (April), quotes 
a pamphlet in which the inscription over the Gate of Hell {Inf. iii. 
1-3) is applied to a slave-ship. 

Philip Neve, in Cursory Remarks on some of the Ancient English 
Poets, particularly Milton, discusses the indebtedness of Chaucer and 
Milton to Dante. 

1789-90 
Henry James Pye, in contribution to J. P. Andrews's Anecdotes, 
Ancient and Modern, mentions the so-called prophecy of Dante as to 
the discovery of the constellation of the Southern Cross (indexed as 
' Dante prophesies the discovery of America ') in Purg. i. 22-4. 

1790 

John Wesley, in his Journal (Oct. 7), mentions seeing, at the 
Duke of Dorset's house at Knole Park, Reynolds's picture of Count 
Ugolino and his sons, and remarks that owing to the bad light he 
' could hardly discern the little boy, that when he saw his father 
gnawing his own arm for anguish, cried out, " Papa, if you are 
hungry, do not eat your own arm, but mine." ' 

William Blake, in his Marriage of Heaven and Hell, declares that 
an infinite number of volumes of equal value with Swedenborg's 
might be produced from the writings of Dante or Shakespeare. 



36 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1790 — continued. 

Thomas Penrose : A Sketch (anonymous) of the Lives and 
Writings of Dante and Petrarch. (Lond.) 

Gibbon, in Antiquities of the House of Brunswick, says, 'The father 
of the Tuscan Muses, the subHme but unequal Dante, had pronounced 
that Ferrara was never honoured with the name of a poet' — the 
reference being to V.E. i. 15, 11. 21-2. 

1791 

James Boswell, in Life of Samuel Johnson, under the year 1778, 
quotes from Redi the lines of the ' divine poet ' (from Inf. xvi. 
124-6), as to a truth which bears the semblance of falsehood. 

Earl of Mornington (afterwards Marquis Wellesley), in letter 
to Lord Grenville (July 3), gives his opinion of Dante, Tasso, and 
Ariosto. 

1792 

Henry Francis Cary, in letter from Oxford to Anna Seward 
(May 7), advises her to make the acquaintance of ' the wonders of 
Dante's Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso ', and sends her a transla- 
tion (prose) of Purg. iii. 79-83 ; v. 37-9 ; she in reply (May 29), 
criticizes the passages translated by him. 

1793 

Isaac D'Israeli, in vol. ii. of Curiosities of Literature, remarks that 
' when Dante published his Inferno, the simplicity of the age accepted 
it as a true narrative of his descent into hell '. 

In Annual Register the inscription over the Gate of Hell {Inf. 
iii. 1-3) is quoted in connexion with the imprisonment and execution 
of Louis XVI. 

John Flaxman publishes at Rome 111 ' Compositions from the 
Divina Commedia ', executed as commission from Thomas Hope 
(afterwards of Deepdene). 

William Blake : pencil drawing of ' Ugolino ', as sketch for 
design in Ttie Gates of Paradise. 

[See Gilchrist's Life of Blake, i. 101-4.] 

1794 

H. F. Cary quotes Par. xi. 1-3 as motto to his poem ' The Mountain 
Seat ' in the Gentleman's Magazine (Feb.). 

Charles James Fox, in letter to Lord Holland in Italy (March 9), 
advLses him ' to have a master, and to read with him Dante and other 
difficult authors '. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 37 

Mrs. Piozzi, in British Synonymy, quotes and translates the last 
line {Inf. iii. 9) from ' Dante's inscription on the Gates of Hell '. 

Henry Constantine Jennings : A Translation (in blank verse) 

of the Fifth Canto of Dante's Inferno, and of the entire Scene and 

Narrative of Hugolino. 

[Privately printed- — it was published in Jennings's Summary and Free 
Reflections in 1798.] 

Sib Uvedale Price, in Essay on the Picturesqtie, instances Dante 
as a master of the sublime and terrible. 

Mary Berry, in letter to Lord Orford (Oct. 1), applies to France 
Dante's invective against Pisa {Inf. xxxiii. 79). 

1795 

William Tooke, in Varieties of Literature, discusses Dante in 
relation to Niccola Pisano, Cimabue, and Giotto. 

William Roscoe, in Life of Lorenzo de Medici, in which are sundry 
criticisms of Dante's works, says of the Commedia, ' compared with 
the Aeneid, it is a piece of grand Gothic architecture at the side of 
a beautifid Roman temple.' 

1796 

George Ellis, in preface to Way's translation of select Fabliaux, 
refers to Dante's use of the terms oc and oil in the De Vulgari Elo- 
quentia (i. 8, 9, 10). 

Charles Lamb, in letter to Coleridge (June 10), states that he 
conceives Southey's Joan of Arc to be in ' the manner of Dante '. 

1797 

H. F. Cary, in his Literary Journal, records the progress (from 
Jan. 16 to Dec. 26) of his reading and translation of the Purgatorio 
and Inferno. 

Charles Lamb, in letter to Coleridge (Feb. 13), speaks of his 
' laugh of horror at Dante's picture of the famished Ugolino '. 

Earl of Charlemont : ' Some Hints concerning the State of 

Science at the Revival of Letters, grounded on a Passage of Dante 

in his Inferno, Canto IV, v. 130 ' (contains verse translation of Inf. 

iv. 130-5). 

[A paper read before the Royal Irish Academy on April 9, 1796, and pub- 
Iisl)ed in the Transactions in 1797. Lord Charlemont translated other 
portions of the Divina Commedia (in a note in his Select Sonnets of Petrarch 
he sjjeaks of his ' essay towards a version of some cantos and singular 
passages of Dante '), including Inf. x, but these have not been printed, 
and apparently have not been preserved. In F. Hardy's L^e of Lord 
Charlemont (1810) it is stated that he made ' a version of Dante ', meaning 
presumably of the whole poem.] 



88 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1797 — continued. 

Ailnong ' Poggiana ', in Selections from the French Anus (Oxford), 
are anecdotes of Dante. 

Notice of Dante (in vol. v of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, Edin.). 

Thomas Twining, in Accouitt of a Holiday Tour, a propos of 
tourists, quotes Dante's description of a flock of sheep {Purg. iii. 82-4). 

c. 1798 
Earl of Charlemont, in the introduction to his Select Sonnets 
of Petrarch, speaks of Dante as ' the father of the modern epic ', 
characterizes the Divina Commedia as ' the offspring of a rude age ', 
and condemns his lyrical poems as ' obscure and inelegant '. 
[See under 1797, note ; tWs work was not published till 1822.] 

1798 

H. F. Cary, in his Literary Journal (Jan. 1-22), records that he 
finished reading the Purgatorio. 

William Seward, in Anecdotes of Distinguished Persons, refers 
to Dante's eulogy of Giotto {Purg. xi. 95), and to Michael Angelo's 
admiration for Dante. 

Thomas James Mathias, in TJie Pursuits of Literature, quotes and 
translates (in prose) Inf iv. 81 ; v. 112-14, 130-3 ; vi. 8-11, 100-2 ; 
xxxii. 1-8 ; Purg. xii. 84 ; and (in the introtluction) criticizes Dante's 
language and stj-^le. 

William Taylor, in Monthly Review (July), says that Dante's 
' sublime metaphors and strong lines ', and ' fine passages such as 
the majestic interview with Cavalcanti's shade, and the pathetic 
story of Ugolino ', will not atone for his ' tediousness ' and ' burlesque 
absurdities '. 

Nathan Drake, in Literary Hours, quotes as motto Inf. i. 4-9, 
and characterizes Dante's account of Ugolino as ' the most striking, 
original and affecting scene perhaps in the world '. 

In Extracts from tJie Works of the most celebrated Italian Poets are 
included the Italian text and English translations (by Boyd and 
Hayley) of Inf. iii. 1-30, 82-120 ; v. 121-41 (' Paul and Frances ') ; 
xxiv. 1-15 ; xxxii. 125-39 ; xxxiii. 1-90 (' Hugolino '). 

1799 
G. T. : Critique of Divina Commedia, in ' Remarks on the Principal 
Italian Poets ', in Monthly Magazine (July). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 39 

C. 1800 

Charles Dunstek, in Annotation)/ on Milton's Paradise Lost, 

points out sundry parallels between Milton and Dante. 

[These annotations were supplied in MS. to H. J. Todd, wlio printed them 
in his edition of Milton's Poetical Works (1801).] 

. 1800 
H. F. Gary records in his Literary Journal (May 23 -June 6) that 
he translated Cantos i-iii of the Inferno. 

Cyril Jackson, Dean of Christ Church, holds ' that of all, in every 
age and nation, who have aspired to the name of poet, only four 
deserve it : Homer, Dante, Ariosto, and Shakespeare '. 

[See Miss Seward's letter to Rev. R. Fellowes, Sept. 27, 1800.] 

William Blake holds ' visionary conversations ' with Homer, 
Dante, and Milton. 

[See Gilchrist's Life of Blake, i. 160.] 

Mariana Starke, in Letters from Italy, mentions the fresco at 
Pisa ' representing Dante's Inferno ' ; the ' sasso di Dante ' at 
Florence ; • and Fonte Branda at Siena, referred to (as she supposes) 
in Inf. XXX. 78. 

John Watkins : biographical notice of Dante, in Universal 
Biographical and Historical Dictionary. 

Cent. XIX 

c. 1801 
Blake : portrait of Dante, as one of a series of eighteen heads of 
poets, for Hayley's library at Felpham. 

[Exhibited at the Burlington Fine Arts Club (No. 34) in 1876.] 

1801 

On the Commedia of Dante (in Monthly Magazine, Feb.). 

Henry John Todd, in his edition of the Poetical Works of John 
Milton, discusses Milton's indebtedness to Dante, and gives a lengthy 
list of parallels between the two jioets. 

William Parr Greswell, in his Memoirs of Angelus Politianus, 
etc., compares Politian and Lorenzo de' Medici severally with 
Petrarch and Dante. 

Richard Duppa : drawing of vignette to canto iii of the Inferno 
(the Gate of Hell), engraved as frontispiece to his Selection of Twelve 
Heads from the Last Judgment of Michael Angela. 

FusELi, in Lectures on Painting, points out Michael Angelo's in- 
debtedness to Dante ; and in his criticism of the cartoon of Pisa, 



40 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1801 — c on tinued. 
using ' the bold figure of Dante ', says that the ideas of motion 
' seem to have showered into the artist's mind ' {Purg. xvii. 25). 

Robert Southey, in letter to Willian Taylor (Nov. 19), speaks of 
the article by G. T. in the Monthly Magazine for July 1799 as ' hewing 
the laurels from the grave of Dante '. 

1802 

C. J. Fox, in letter to J. B. Trotter, says ' I have only read part 
of Dante, and admire him very much. I think the brilliant passages 
are thicker set in his works, than in those of almost any other poet ; 
but the want of connexion and interest makes him heavy '. 

.John Aikin : article on Dante, and criticism of the Commedia, 
in vol. iii. of the General Biography. 

William Shepherd, in Life of Poggio Bracciolini, relates the 
anecdote of Dante and Can Grande from Poggio 's Facetiae. 

Notice of Dante (in FMglish Encyclopaedia). 

Samuel Taylor Coleridge notes (in Anima Poetae, imder date 
Oct. 25) that for his part he would inscribe over the gate of Paradise 
the line (Inf. iii. 9) Dante has placed over the gate of his Hell. 

T. J. Mathias prints (for the first time in England) Dante's Caiiz. 
iii. : ' Gli occhi dolenti ' [V.N. § 32), and Son. xxiv. : ' Deh, pelle- 
grini ' (V.N. § 41), in Componimenti Lirici de' piii illustri Poeti 
d'ltalia. (Lond., 3 vols.) 

Of the sources whence Dante is supposed toiiave drawn the Subject 
bt his Divina Commedia (in Monthly Magazine, Nov.). 

Henry Crabbe Robinson, in the account of his toiu- in Germany 
in his Diary, describes Shakespeare, Goethe, and Dante as ' the triple 
glory of modern poetry '. 

Henry Boyd : The Divina Commedia of Dante Alighieri. Trans- 
lated into English Verse, with preliminary Essays. Notes, and 
Illustrations. (Lond., 3 vols.) 

[Reviewed in Edinburgh Review, Jan. 1803 ; Critical Review, Mar. 1803 ; 
British Critic, Mar. 1803 ; Monthly Magazine, vol. xv, 1803 ; Monthly 
Review, Mar. 1805.] 

Thomas Stothard : drawing of portrait of Dante (engraved by 

R. H. Cromek as frontispiece to vol. i. of Boyd's translation of the 

Commedia). 

c. 1803 
Edward Atkyns Bray : translation (verse) of Cam. ix. 1-19 ; 
and Son. xi. {V.N. § 21) (in Poetical Remains, Lond., 1859). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 41 

1808 

Robert Morehead : ' The Divina Comrnedia and Boyd's transla- 
tion ' (in Edinburgh Review, Jan.). 

C. J. Fox, in conversation (Jan.), as recorded by Samuel Rogers, 
speaks of Dante as ' a much greater man ' than Petrarch. 

Countess of Bessborough, in letter from Paris to Lord Granville 
Leveson Gower (Feb. 17), quotes Inf. v. 23-4, a propos of the First 
Consul. 

C. J. Fox, in letter to Lord Holland (June 6), quotes Inf. v. 23-4 ; 
and, in a letter to J. B. Trotter, speaks of the obscurity of Dante 
owing to his allusions. 

The Divina Comrnedia and Boyd's translation (in Annual Review 
and History of Literature). 

In Monthly Magazine (Aug.) it is suggested that Fuseli should 
illustrate the Comrnedia. 

William Godwin, in Life of Geoffrey Chaucer, gives an appreciation 
of Dante and of the Comrnedia. 

John Raphael Smith: oil painting of 'Paulo and Francosia ' 

{Inf. V. 127-9). (R.A., No. 559.) 

[Engraved in mezzotint by William Ward — a copy in colour was sold 
for 80 guineas at Christie's, April 16, 1913.] 

1804 

The Literary Journal (Feb. 16) announces that 'a subscription 
has been opened at Florence for erecting a monument in the cathedral 
there, to the memory of the great poet Dante '. 

Richard Wharton: translation of Inf. iii. ('The Entrance of 
Hell '), and Inf. xxxii. 124-xxxiii. 90 (' The Story of Ugolino ') (in 
Fables : Consisting of Select Parts from Dante, Berni, Chaucer, and 
Ariosto. Imitated in English Heroic Verse. Lond.). 
[Reviewed in Monthly Revieiv (Dec.).] 

John Wilson Crokeu, in his Familiar Epistles to F. Jones, on 
the present State of the Irish Stage, imitates and quotes Inf. iii. 34-6. 

Benjamin Robert Haydon, in a list of thirty-eight subjects for 
pictures, includes (as No. 10) ' Ugolino ' (from Inf. xxxiii.). 

1805 

The Bodleian Library purchases the D'Orville collection of MSS., 

among them a Cent. XV MS. of the Divina Commedia. 

[This was the firet Dante MS. acquired by the Bodleian (see Macray, 
Annals of the Bodleian, ed. 1890, p. 301, n»). The University Library had 
formerly possessed two Dante MSS., presented by Humphrey Duke of 
Gloucester in 1444, but these had disappeared.] 



42 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 805 — continued. 

H. F. Cary : The Inferno of Dante Alighieri : Canto i-xvii. With 
a Translation in Englisli Blank Verse, Notes, and a Life of the 
Author. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Gentleman's Magazine, June ; British Critic, July ; and 
Literary Journal, 1805.] 

H. J. ToDD, in his edition of The Works of Edmund Spenser, 
points out sundry parallels between Spenser and Dante. 

Joseph Cooper Walker, in Ati Historical and Critical Essay on 
the Revival of the Drama in Italy, quotes and translates Par. xxx. 
22-4, as a supposed reference by Dante to the theatre of his day. 

The Divina Commedia and Cary's translation (in Literary Journal). 

Comparison between Dante and Saemund, the former being 
described as a ' talkative Showman ' (in Annual Review, an History 
of Literature). 

J. A. Koch's drawings in illustration of the Divina Commedia (in 
Monthly Magazine, May). 

Coleridge (in Anima Poetae, luider date May 11) names Dante, 
Ariosto, and Giordano Bruno as the representatives of ' his ' Italy. 

Anna Seward, in letter to Miss Ponsonby (June 18), criticizes 
the Inferno a propos of Cary's translation of Cantos i-xvii ; in letter 
to H. F. Cary (Aug. 8) she remarks that the description of Dante 
in the Gentleman's Magazine as ' one of the most obscene \ instead 
of ' one of the most obscure ', writers would probably help to increase 
the circulation of his translation. 

William Wordsworth, in letter to Sir G. Beaumont (Oct. 17), 
says ' the poetry of Dante and Michael Angelo proves that if there 
be little majesty and strength in Italian verse, the fault is in the 
authors, and not in the tongue '. 

William T.wlor, in article on Beresford's ' Song of the Sun ', in 
the Monthly Review (Dec), remarks that ' Italian priests, perhaps, 
suggested to Dante the absurdities of his Inferno and Paradiso '. 

Norton Nicholls, in Reminiscences of Gray, records his conversa- 
tions with Gray on Dante. 

Edward Scriven : portrait of Dante, after Raphael Morghen 
(engraved as frontispiece to Cary's translation of Inferno i-x\ ii). 

1806 
H. F. Cary : The Inferno of Dante Alighieri : Canto xviii -xxxiv. 
With a Translation in English Blank Verse, and Notes. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Monthly Review, Apr. 1808.] 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 48 

Anna Seward criticizes (Aug. 7 and Sept. 6), and H. F. Cary 
(Aug. 16 and Sept.) defends, his translation of the Inferno by corre- 
spondence. 

Coleridge (in Anima Poetae) describes as ' a poem of wild and 
interesting images, intended as an enigma ', Dante's Canz. xx. : 
' Tre donne intorno al cuor mi son venute,' which he transcribes. 

H. FusELi : oil painting of ' Count Ugolino . . . with his four sons, 

starved to death in the Torre delta Fame '. (R. A., No. 19.) 

[This picture was severely criticized in Belts Weekly Messenger for May 25 
and warmly defended by Blake in the Monthly Magazine for July 1 .] 

Charles Symmons, in Life of John Milton, contrasts the sonnets 
of Dante and Petrarch, and ranks Paradise Lost above the Commedia. 

Richard Duppa, in Life of Michael Angela, records the artist's 
devotion to Dante, and discusses Dante's influence on his art. 

SouTHEY : translation of Michael Angelo's two sonnets on Dante 
(in Duppa 's Life of Michael Angelo). 

P. : Biographical Sketch of Dante Alighieri (in Monthly Literary 
Recreations, July -Dec.). 

Thomas Moore : motto from Inf. xvi. 1-2, to Lines on the Falls 
of the Mohawk River; and reminiscence oF Purg. ii. 31-6, in poem 
addressed to Lady Rawdon, From the Banks of the St. Lawrence. 

Lord Byron invokes ' the shade of Dante ', in letter to John M. B. 
Pigot (Aug. 9). 

1806-7 

Capell Lofft : translations of four sonnets of Dante [_Son. xxxiii, 
XXXV, xxxviii, xxiv) (in Laura : or, An Anthology of Sonnets . . . 
Original and translated, 5 vols., pub. in 1813-14). 

1807 

The British Museum acquires by purchase the Lansdowne MSS., 
including a Cent. XV MS. of the Commedia. 

Anna Seward, in letter to H. F. Cary (May 10), records Walter 
Scott's opinion of the Commedia, and of Cary's translation. 

Flaxman's ' Compositions from the Divina Commedia ' first pub- 
lished in England, with quotations from the Italian text, and trans- 
lations by Boyd. 

Notice of Dante (in Historic Gallery of Portraits and Paintings ; 
or. Biographical Review, i. 26 ff.). 

Nathaniel Howard : The Inferno of Dante Alighieri, translated 
into English Blank Verse. With Notes, and Life of the Author. 
(Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Monthly Review, Oct. 1807 ; British Critic, Apr. 1808.] 



44 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DAXTE 

1 807 — continued. 

SouTHKY, iu Specimem- of tlie later English Potts, remarks on the 
enduring fame of Dante, Petrarch, and Chaucer. 

Francis Douce, in Illustrations of Shakespeare, quotes Dante's 
reference to the ' man in the moon ' {Inf. xx. 126), and to the word 
fico as a term of contempt {Inf. xxv. 1-3). 

George Cooke : engraving of portrait of Dante, after Stradanus 
(pub. by Vernon Hood and Sharpe, Lond.). 

William Beloe, in vol. i. of Anecdotes of Literature and Scarce 
Books, gives ai^ account of the 1568 Venice and the 1481 Florence 
editions of the Divina Commedia. 

1807-8 
Wordsworth introduces reminiscence of Inf. iii. 1 in The White 
Doe of Bylstone {vi. 1) (pub. in 1815). 

1808 

T. J. Mathias prints (for the first time in England) Dante's 
Cam. i. : 'Donne, ch' avete intelletto d'amore' {V.N. § 19), and 
Cam. vii. : ' Amor, che nella mente mi ragiona ' {Conv. iii.), in 
Aggiunta ai Componimenti Lirici de' piii illustri Poeti d' Italia. 
(Lond., 3 vols.) 

In the Catalogue of the Harleian MSS. in the British Museum are 
registered five MSS. of the Divina Commedia {Harl. 3459, 3460, 3488, 
3513, 3581), one of Dante's Canzoniere {Harl. 3478), and one of 
Boccaccio's Vita di Dante {Harl. 4082). 
• • [See also under 1753, 1759.] 

La Divina Commedia di Dante. Passo passo risconirata, con lunga 

e scrupulosa diligenza, su i testi delle piii approvate edizioni, antiche 

e moderne, e da ogni tipografico neo tersa ed emendata. Da G. B. 

Boschini. (Londra, 3 vols., 16mo.) 

[TJiis (or the following, published in the same year) is the first edition of 
the complete text of the Commedia printed and published in England. 
(An edition, with the imprint Londra, had appeared in 1778, but this was 
actually printed at Leghorn.) A brief Life of Dante is prefixed to the 
first volume. It contains no notes.] 

La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri, illustrata di note da varj 

comentatori scelte ed abbreviate, da Romualdo Zotti. (Londra, 3 vols, 

12mo.) 

[See note to preceding. A Life of Dante, and other preliminary matter, is 
prefixed to the first volume. The third volume contains index of proper 
names.] 

In Monthly Magazine (Nov. ) an alleged mistake of Dante with regard 

to his reference to Constantine in Inf. xix. 115-17 is discussed. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 45 

Anthony Cardon : engraving of portrait of Dante, after 
Raphael. 

[Frontispiece to vol. i of Boschini's edition of the Comtnedia.] 

1809 

Canzoni e Soneiti di Uaiite Alighieri, per la prima volta di note 

illustrati, da Romualdo Zotti. (Londra, 12nio.) 

[Uniform with Zotti's edition of the Commedia published in 1808, to which 
it forms vol. iv. This is the first collection of Dante's lyrical poems 
printed and published in England.] 

H. FusELi, in letter to J. Knowles (Aug. 31), quotes Dante's 

(alleged) definition of woman as ' the animal of beauty '. 

c. 1810 

George Fredekick Nott commissions the Viennese artist, 

Josef Anton Koch, to make a series of drawings from the Commedia. 

[Koch executed forty sepia drawings, illustrating the Inferno and part 
of the PuTgatorio, which eventually came into the possession of King 
John of Saxony, the translator of the Commedia under the pseudonym 
' Philalethes ', and are now preserved at Dresden.] 

1810 

Coleridge (in Anima Poetae) speaks of the ' Tuscanisms ' of 
Dante, and refers to his De Vulgari Eloqnentia, Convito, and Vita 
Numm, as his ' prose and verse ' works. 

Samuel Egeuton Brydges, in The British Bibliographer, numbers 
Dante among the epic poets. 

Lord Woodhouslee, in his anonymdus Essay on the Life and 
Character of Petrarch, quotes Vasari's accounts of the portraits of 
Dante and Petrarch. 

Samuel Rogers, in The Voyage of Columbus, speaks of Dante's 
'■ tragic rhyme ', and imitates several passages of the Commedia, the 
originals of which he quotes in his notes. 

Notice of Dante (in A Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Persons, 
Glasg.) 

Ill Quarterly Review (Nov.), Art xi, the adventures of St. Brandan, 
and of Southey's Madoc, are compared with the voyage of Ulysses 
as related by Dante in Inf. xxvi. 90-142. 

Archer James Oliver : oil painting of ' Paulo and Francesca ' 
(Brit. Inst., No. 61). 

1811 

Henry Crabb Robinson, in his Diary (Jan. 17), records Flaxman's 
account of his reasons for choosing Dante rather than Milton as 
a subject for illustration. 



46 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1811 — continued. 

Walter Scott, in review of Southey's ' Curse of Kehama ' in 
Quarterly Review (Feb.), speaks of ' the gloomy power ', ' the solem- 
nity,' and ' the tedious particularity ' of Dante. 

Michael Wodhull purchases (May 29) from William Ford of 
Manchester for £10 10s. a MS. (incomplete) of Giovanni da Serravalle's 
Latin commentary on the Divina Commedia (now Egerton 2629 in 
Brit. Mus.). (See also under 1781.) 

John Bernakd Trotter, in his Memoirs of the latter Years of 
CJiarles James Fox, applies to Fox Beatrice's address to Virgil, 
Inf. ii. 59-60. 

Thomas Frognall Dibdin, in his privately printed Book Rarities 

in Lord Spencer's Library, registers the first three editions of the 

Divina Commedia, viz. Foligno, 1472 ; Mantua, 1472 ; and Jesi, 

1472. 

[The above arc now in the John Rylands Library at Manchester. The 
.Jesi edition is exceedingly rare, only six copies being known, of which 
three are in England (see Athenaeum, June 23, July 14, 1900).] 

Abraham Raimbach : engraving of Sir Joshua Reynolds's ' Ugo- 
lino' (R.A., 1778), for Forster's British Gallery of Engravings. 

1812 

H. F. Cary records in his Literary Journal (May 8) the completion 
of his translation of the Divina Commedia, begun Jan. 16, 1797 ; 
and notes (Nov. 6, 9) that he examined four MSS. of Dante in the 
British Museum. 

In the sale of the library of the Duke of Roxburghe (May-July) 
seven Cent. XVI editions of the Commedia were included, of which 
only one (Venice, 1564, sold for 28s.) fetched more than £1. 

In Quarterly Review (June), Art. x, a resume is given of the Farinata 
episode {Inf. x. 22 ff.), and an account of Dante's relations with the 
Bianchi. 

Joseph Hume : Inferno, A Translation from Dante Alighieri, 
into English Blank Verse. (Lond.) 

Walter Savage Landor, in A Commentary on the Life and 
Character of Charles James Fox (printed anonymously in this year, 
first published in 1907), contrasts Dante and Ariosto and emphasizes ' 
the irresistible fascination of the former. 

Leigh Hunt, in letter to Brougham (Sept. 27), speaks of Dante's 
bitterness against Florence, and his condemnation of Bnmetto 
Latini (Inf. xv). 



IX LITERATURE AND ART 47 

1813 

Thomas Mitchell, in letter to Leigh Hunt (Feb. 9) while in prison, 
applies to him what Dante says {Inf. iv. 118-19) of the great spirits 
in Limbo. 

In the sale of ' rare and fine books ' from the library of Colonel 
Stanley (April -May) were included three editions of the Comniedia, 
Grangier's French translation (Paris, 1597), and Carlo d'Aquino's 
Latin translation (Naples, 1728). 

In Quarterly Review (July), Art. xii, Villani's many references to 
Dante in his Chronicle are quoted as evidence of the high reputation 
of the poet among his contemporaries. 

Coleridge, in lecture on Shakespeare at Bristol (Oct, 28), remarks 
that Dante was unconscious of the greater power working within 
him, which carried him beyond his original, Virgil. 

James Nortiicote, in Memoirs of Sir Joshua Reynolds, give 
the history of Sir Joshua's picture of Ugolino, and epitomizes 
Dante's account in Inf. xxxiii. 

Robert Bland, in preface to Collections from the Greek Anthology, 
quotes the last line (Inf. iii. 9) of the inscription over the Gate of 
Hell ; and in the notes on Sappho quotes and translates (in verse). 
Inf. iii. 49-51, 64. 

Thomas Dunham Whitaker, in his edition of Tlie Vision of 
William concerning Piers Plouhman, raises the question as to whether 
Langland imitated Dante. 

Byron, in his Journal (Nov. 25), names Dante among those he 
excepts from the ' idle brood ' of writers. 

Alexander Chalmers : notice of Dante and criticism of the 
Comniedia (in vol. xi. of the General Biographical Dictionary). 

Joseph Forsyth, in Remarks on Antiquities, Arts, and Letters, 
during an Excursion in Italy, in the years 1802 and 1803, displays 
an intimate acquaintance with the Commedia, numerous quotations 
from which are introduced in the narrative. 

John Chetwode Eustace, in his Classical Tour through Italy, 
speaks of the ' originality and grandeur ' of Dante, and quotes 
sundry of his geographical descriptions. 

Lord Thurlow, in An Appendix to Poems on Several Occasions, 
laments the neglect of Dante, Ariosto, and Shakespeare. 

1814 
In Gentleman's Magazine (March-April) Dante's application of the 
term ' il gran vermo ' to Cerberus (Inf. vi. 22) is discussed. 

R. Bland in Quarterly Reviezv (April), Art. i, gives a criticism 



48 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1814 — continued. 
of the Commedia, many passages of which he quotes and translates 
in terza rima. 

In Quarterly Review (Oct.), Art. iii, Dante is praised for the 
' strength and severity ' of his style, and criticized for the ' puerile, 
sometimes shocking, frequently dull, matter ' of the Commedia. 

Lord Thuelow, in Moonlight, and other Poems, introduces Dante 
in company with Homer, as among the authors read by his uncle, 
the Lord Chancellor, in his old age. 

H. F. Gary : The Vision ; or Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, 

of Dante Alighieri. (Lond. 3 vols., 32mo.) 

[The first edition of Gary's complete translation, printed at the translator's 
own expense. Notes are printed at the end of each volume. Reviewed in 
Gentleman's Magazine, Mar. ; Critical Review ; Monthly Review, Mar. 1815 ; 
Edinburgh Review, Feb. 1818 ; Qfiarterly Review, June 1826, Art. i.] 

T. J. Mathias, in a note to Gray's ' Some Observations on the 
use of Rhyme ', in his edition of the Works of Gray, quotes and 
applies to Gray an adaptation of Par. i. 125-9 ; and, in a note to 
Gray's 'Some Remarks on the Poems of Lydgate ', in the same, 
applies to Gray Dante's title for Virgil {Purg. xviii. 2) ; and, in 
a Postscript to the same work, discusses Gray's knowledge of Dante, 
and gives an estimate of Dante and Petrarch as the cteators of the 
Italian language. 

Byron prefixes mottoes from Dante to the several cantos of 
The Corsair, viz. Inf. v. 121-8 to Canto i. Inf. v. 120 to Canto ii. 
Inf. V. 105 to Canto iii. 

Robert Morehead, in his (anonymous) Poetical Epistles : and 
Specimens of Poetical Translation, particularly from Petrarch and 
Dante, includes a rendering of the ' Story of Ugolino, from Dante's 
Inferno ' {Inf. xxxii. 1-39, 125-39 ; xxxiii. 1-78) in Spenserian 
stanzas, the earliest specimen of English translation from Dante 
in that metre. 

Sir S. E. Brydges, in Restituta, suggests that an ' Essay on the 
Infelicity of Poets ' might be composed on the ' sorrows of Dante 
and Petrarch and Tasso ', and the sufferings of Spenser, Milton, and 
other English poets. 

In the English version of Ugo Foseolo's Letters of Ortis are transla- 
tions of several passages from the Commedia. 

William Hazlitt, in The Romid Table, in ' On Posthumous 
Fame ', quotes a free rendering of Inf. iv. 76-8 ; and in the essay 
on ' Why the Arts are not Progressive ? ' speaks of Homer, Dante, 
and Shakespeare among poets as ' unrivalled in strength and stature, 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 49 

and unsurpassed in grace and beauty '. In ' Wilson's Landscapes ', 
in The Champion (July 17), he applies to Claude Michael Angelo's 
apostrophe to Dante in one of his sonnets ; and in article on 
' L. Buonaparte's Charlemagne ', in the same (Dec. 25), he speaks 
of ' the severe grandeur of Dante '. 

Joseph Berington, in A Literary History of the Middle Ages, gives 
a notice of Dante, and an account of the Commedia. 

Helen Maria Williams, in translation of Humboldt's Travels, 
quotes Dante's supposed allusion to the Southern Cross (Purg. 
i. 22-7). 

John Colin Dunlop, in his History of Fiction, refers to Dante's 
acquaintance with the Arthurian Romances ; quotes anecdotes 
of him from Sacchetti and Cinthio ; and points out resemblances 
between Ford and Dante, and Bunyan and Dante. 

John Herman Merivale, in Orlando in Roncesvalles, introduces 
illustrations from the Commedia, and translates Purg. viii. 1-6 in 
ottava rima. 

In European Magazine, and London Bevieiv, the beauties and defects 
of the Commedia are appraised (vol. Ixvi, pp. 104 ff.^ 197 ff., 315 ff.). 

1815 

W. Hazlitt, in ' Sismondi's Literature of the South ', in the Edin- 
burgh Review (June), gives an estimate of Dante and of the Commedia, 
and severely criticizes Reynolds's ' Ugolino ' ; and in ' On Milton's 
Versification ', in The Round Table, compares Milton with Dante. 

Countess of Bessborough, in letter to Lord Granville Leveson 
Gower (July 13), a propos of her rapid journey from Stuttgart to 
Brussels, to see her wounded son, quotes Inf. v. 87. 

G. F. NoTT, in his edition of Tlie Works of Henry Howard, Earl of 
Surrey, and of Sir Thomas Wyatt, the Elder, makes frequent reference 
to Dante, discussing his versification, with quotations, and his use 
of particular words, and dwelling on the simplicity and majesty of 
his style. 

Sharon Turner, in his History of England, discusses the influence 
of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio on Gower and Chaucer. 

John Black, in translation of Schlegel's Lectures on Dramatic 
Art and Literature, reproduces Schlegel's remarks on Dante as com- 
pared with Aeschylus, Shakespeare, and Milton. 

Percy Bysshe Shelley, in essay On the Revival of Literature, 
characterizes Dante and Petrarch as forerimners of the revival of 
letters ; and in the Speculations on Morals numbers Dante among the 
masters of expression. 

£ 



50 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1815 — continued. 

T. F. DiBDiN, in vol. iv. of his Bibliotheca Spenceriana, registers 
five Cent. XV editions of the Divina Commedia, viz. the three of 
1472 (see above, under 1811), and those of Venice, 1477, and Florence, 
1481 ; and the editio prirweps of the Convivio (Florence, 1490). 

In European Magazine, and London Review, in continuation of the 
previous review of the Commedia (see under 1814), a number of the 
finest descriptive passages are quoted in the original. 

1816 

W. Hazlitt, in ' Schlegel's Lectures on Dramatic Literature ', in 
Edinburgh Review (Feb.), reflects upon Dante's selection of Virgil 
and Beatrice respectively as his guides through the realms of woe 
and the abodes of the blest. 

Clara Mary Jane Clairmont, in letter to Byron (c. April), 
transcribes Dante's sonnet to Guido Cavalcanti (' Guido, vorrei '), 
and applies to marriage the last line of the inscription over the Gate 
of Hell (Inf. iii. 9). 

Leigh Hunt, in preface to his Story of Rimini, explains that it is 
founded upon the episode of Paolo and Francesca in Inf. v. 

W. Hazlitt, in ' Leigh Hvuit's Story of Rimini ', in Edinburgh 
Review (June), declares an imitation of Dante's manner to be an 
impossibility. 

In ' Select Notices of Italian Literature ' in Monthly Magazine 
(July), Dante's Vision is contrasted with the Vision of Tantalus. 

In the sale of William Roscoe's library at Liverpool (Aug.), sixteen 
Dante items were included, among them being nine editions of the 
Divina Commedia (of which three were of Cent. XV, and five of 
Cent. XVI), and the editio princeps (in Trissino's translation) of the 
De Vulgari Eloquentia (Vicenza, 1529). 

Walter Scott, in article on ' Byron's Childe Harold (Canto third) ', 
in Quarterly Review (Oct.), compares Bonnivard's fate with that of 
Ugolino (Inf. xxxiii). 

In the Catalogue of Printed Books in the British Museum twenty- 
four Dante items are registered, including two editions of Dante's 
Opere, fourteen editions of the Divina Commedia, Trissino's transla- 
tion of the De Vulgari Eloquentia (1529), and the editio princeps 
of the Vita Nuova (1576) ; besides Villegas's Castilian translation of 
the Inferno (Burgos, 1515), and the English translations of Rogers 
(1782), Boyd (1785), and Cary (1814). 

William Young Otti^y, in An Enquiry into tlie Origin and 
early History of Engraving upon Copper and in Wood, translates 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 51 

Vasari's account of Botticelli as a commentator and illustrator of 
Dante. 

Stefano Egidio Petronj : Dante, Ariosto e Tasso. Epitome 
della lor Vita, ed Analisi dei loro principali Poemi. (Londra.) 

Thomas Noon Talfourd, in Memorials of Charles Lamb, reports 
a conversation of Thomas Barnes with Lamb respecting the tragic 
power of Dante as compared with that of Shakespeare. 

Thomas Love Peacock, in Headlong Hall, introduces a ' terzetto ', 
' imitated from a passage in the Purgatorio (viii. 1-6) of Dante '. 

Shelley : translation (verse) of Dante's sonnet to Guido Caval- 
oanti (' Guido, vorrei '), and of a sonnet of Guido to Dante (' lo 
vegno ') ; and adaptation of 11. 12-14 oi Son. xi (' Negli occhi porta ') 
in the Vita Nuova (§ 21). 

Francis Horner, while at Pisa, writes copious notes on the 
Inferno, some of which are printed by C. Lyell in his Poems of the 
Vita Nuova and Convito (1842). 

1817 

Coleridge, in letter to the Courier (March 18) on Southey's ' Wat 
Tyler ', refers to the ' horrid phantoms and torments ' depicted by 
Dante and Quevedo. 

Wordsworth, in letter to S. Rogers (May 13), asks, ' Do you and • 
Dante continue as intimate as heretofore ? ' 

In Quarterly Review (July), Art. iii, allusion is made to Dante's 
description (in Inf. xii. 4-9) of the scenery near Trent. 

Coleridge, in letters to H. F. Cary (Oct. 29, Nov. 6), expresses his 
appreciation of Cary's Dante. 

John Keats, in letter to Haydon (Nov. 20), compares Dante and 
Goethe ; and in article on Edmund Kean in Champion (Dec. 21), 
emphasizes that actor's outstanding merit by applying to him Dante's 
line on Saladin {Inf. iv. 129). 

Coleridge, in Biographia Literaria, remarks on the union of 
poetic genius with the love of libei-ty in Dante and other great poets ; 
expresses the opinion that Dante is excelled by Shakespeare in the 
' picturesque in words ' ; refers to Dante's jealousy for the purity 
of his native tongue as exhibited in his De Vulgari Eloquentia ; in 
an estimate of the Commedia ranks the Inferno above the Purgatorio 
and Paradiso ; contrasts Dante's Hell with that of Milton ; suggests 
Canz. vi. 53-5 (which he quotes and translates) as an appropriate 
motto for Wordsworth's ' Ode on the Intimations of Immortality '. 

The Bodleian Library purchases from Venice the Canonici collec- 
tion of MSS., among which were fourteen of the Divina Commedia, 



52 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

181 7 — -c 07itinued. 
and one containing the Vita Nuova, Convivio, and Canzoniere of 
Dante. 

Walter Scott, in chapters 12 and 13 of Rob Roy, represents 
Diana Vernon as invoking Francis Osbaldistone's assistance to inter- 
pret a difficult passage in the Commedia, which he speaks of as 
Dante's ' wild and gloomy poem '. 

Isaac D'Israeli, in vol. iii. of Curiosities of Literature, relates an 
anecdote of Dante from Poggio ; and suggests that Gray was 
indebted to Milton as well as Dante in the opening lines of the 
Elegy. 

Mrs. Ansley : oil painting of ' Francesca ' (Brit. Inst., No. 81), 
suggested by Leigh Hunt's Story of Rimini, from Inf. v. 

1818 

Keats, in article on Dillon's ' Retribution ', in Champion (Jan. 4), 
says ' the names of old plays are Dantean inscriptions over the gates 
of hell, hea^■en, or purgatory '. 

Biographical notice of Dante, with sketch of the ' general plan ' 
of the Commedia, and numerous translations in prose and verse, in 
Monthly Magazine (Feb.). 

Ugo Foscolo, in Edinburgh Review (Feb.), reviews Biagioli's 
edition of the Commedia, and Gary's ' Vision of Dante '. 

Coleridge, in lecture in London on the Troubadours (Feb. 3), 
speaks of the debt of English poets to Dante, and refers to Dante's 
alleged prophetic utterance in the Purgatorio (i. 22-4) as to the 
Southern Cross ; in lecture on Rabelais (Feb. 24) he names Dante, 
with Shakespeare and Cervantes, among the creative minds of the 
world ; and in lecture on Dante (Feb. 27) he indicates Dante's chief 
excellences as a poet, quoting by way of illustration numerous 
passages from the Commedia, with Cary's renderings. 

B. R. Haydon, in letter to Keats (March 25), expresses the wish 
to have Dante under his head on his death-betl. 

Byron, in canto iv of Childe Harold, describes Dante and Ariosto 
as ' the bards of Hell and Chivalry ', and upbraids ' ungrateful 
Florence ' for her ejection of Dante. 

Mrs. Shelley, in her Journal at Como (April 11 ) and Este (Sept. 5), 
records that she and Shelley were reading Dante, 

Shelley, in letter to Peacock from Milan (April 20), says that he 
reads Dante in the Cathedral ; and in another from Bologna 
(Nov. 10), speaking of the evanescence of painting as compared to 
literature, he compares the relation of Zeuxis and Apelles to Homer 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 58 

and Aeschylus, with that of Guido and Raphael to Dante and 
Petrarch. 

John Gibsox Lockhart, in ' Remarks on the Periodical Criticism 
of Enfjland ', in Blackivood's Magazine (March), classes Goethe with 
Dante and Shakespeare ; and in translation of Schlegel's Lectures on 
the History of Literature reproduces Schlegel's criticism of the Cam- 
media, and estimate of Dante as a Christian poet. 

Keats, in letters to B. Bailey (June 10 ; July 22), says the only 
books he is taking on his tour in Scotland are the ' minute volumes ' 
of Cary's Dante. 

Charles Abmitage Brown, in letter to C. W. Dilke (Aug.), says 
that he and Keats are ' always moving — like Dante's inhabitants of 
the Sulphur Kingdom '. 

Leigh Hunt, in letter to Mrs. Shelley (Aug. 4), speaks of Dante, 
Petrarch, and Boccaccio as ' the night, morning, and noon, of the 
great Italian day '. 

Ugo Foscolo, in article on ' Cancellieri's Observations on Dante ' 
in Edinburgh Review (Sept.), discusses the alleged indebtedness of 
Dante to the ' Vision of Alberic ' ; gives an account of Dante's 
lyrical poems ; and translates his letter to a friend in Florence 
(Epist. ix). 

R. Mokehead : ' On the Poetical Character of Dante ' (in Edin- 
burgh Review, Dec). 

William Sotheby, in a poem on Florence in Farewell to Italy, and 
Occasional Poems, speaks of Dante's ' chord of fire ', and of ' the rage 
of mad dissension ' which caused his exile. 

Henry Hallam, in View of the State of Europe during tlw Middle 
Ages, gives an appreciation of Dante and of the Commedia, remarks 
on the style of the Vita Nuova, and quotes Dante's reference to the 
lingua oil, and his account of the dialects of Italy, in the De Vulgari 
Eloquentia. 

John Cam Hobuouse, ui Notes to the fourth canto ofChilde Harold, 
gives an account of the life of Dante, and of the fluctuations of his 
fame as a poet ; and in Historical Illustrations of the same canto, 
appraises the debt of Parini and Monti to Dante. 

Charles Mills, in his History of tJie Crusades, quotes Dante's 
reference, by the mouth of Cacciaguida (Par. xv. 139-44.), to the 
Second Crusade. 

W. Hazlitt, in Lectures on the English Poets, contrasts Dante, 
' the father of modern poetry,' with Homer and the Bible. 

T. L. Peacock, in chapter 6 of Nightmare Abbey, represents 
' Scythrop ' (i.e. Shelley) as taking a volume of Dante, and pretending 



54 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1818 — continued. 
to read the Purgatorio, and ' Mr. Listless ' as remarking that he finds 
Dante is growing fashionable, and that he is afraid he must read 
him ; in chapter 20 of Melincourt, quotes Purg. xii. 84 a propos 
of the evanescence of the feelings of first love. 

Coleridge, in Tfie Friend, quotes Canz. vi. 53-5 from Dante 
a propos of Wordsworth's ' Ode on the Intimations of Immortality '. 

H. FusELi : oil painting of ' Dante overcome by pity and terror 
(Inf. V. 142) at the tale of Paolo and Franeesca '. {R.A., No. 16.) 

1819 

R. MoREHEAD : On Dante's Inferno, with translation (in Spenserian 
stanzas) of Inf. iii. 1-9 ; xxxii. 1-39 (in Edinburgh Magazine, Jan.). 

Shelley, in letter to Peacock from Naples (Feb. 25), speaks of the 
presumption of comparing Michael Angelo with Dante. 

Frances Bunsen, in letter to her mother from Rome (March 16), 
expresses her agreement with Connop Thirlwall's preference of the 
Paradiso to the Inferno or Purgatorio. 

Keats, in letter to George Keats (April 18), expresses his delight 

with the story of Paolo and Franeesca in the fifth canto of the 

Inferno, and encloses his sonnet, A Dream, inspired by the subject. 

[The sonnet, which was written in the first volume of Keats's copy of the 
miniature Cary's Dante, was published in the Indicator for June 28, 
1820.] 

In Quarterly Review (April), Art. i, Dante is compared to Aristo- 
phanes in his fondness for ' adopting a metaphor literally ', Inf. 
xxviii. 33, 139, being quoted as illustrations ; in Art. iv, a place is 
suggested in Dante's Hell {Inf. x. 10 ff.) for unbelievers ; in Art. ix, 
Dante's reference to Roland {Inf. xxxi. 16-18) is quotefl, and the 
question of his acquaintance with Homer and his knowledge of Greek 
is discussed, his remarks in the Convivio (ii. 15, 11. 59 ff.) on the two 
translations of Aristotle being quoted. 

In Quarterly Review (July), Art. viii, a remark of Franklin's is 
illustrated by a reference to Inf. xxxiii. 122-6. 

Shelley, in letter to Leigh Hunt from Livorno (Sept. 3), dissents 
from the view that Michael Angelo is ' the Dante of painting ', and 
asks where he has equalled the Franeesca episode in Inf. v, or such 
passages as Purg. ii. 13-18, and xxviii. 40 ff., and ' all the exquisite 
tenderness and sensibility, and ideal beauty, in which Dante excelled 
all poets except Shakespeare ? ' ; in a second letter (Sept. 27) he 
gives hLs opinion as to the relative order of merit of Dante, Petrarch, 
Boccaccio, Ariosto, and Tasso. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 66 

IvEATS, in letter to George Keats (Sept. 21), says ' the reading of 
Dante is well worth the while '. 

T. Moore, in his Diary, at Florence (Oct. 17), mentions the por- 
trait of Dante in the Cathedral, and the so-called ' sasso di Dante ' ; 
and, at Rom^ (Oct. 30), remarks on the affinity between Michael 
Angelo and Dante. 

Byrox, in letter to Murray from Venice (Oct. 29), mentions his 
projected Prophecy of Dante, ' the subject a view of Italy in the ages 
down to the present — supposing Dante to speak in his aym person, 
previous to his death '. 

R. MoREHEAD : On Dante's Purgatorio (in Edinburgh Magazine, 

Oct.). 

H. F. Gary : The Vision ; or Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, of 
Dante Alighieri. The second edition corrected. With the life of 
Dante, additional notes, and an index. (Lond., 3 vols., 8vo.) 

Coleridge annotates his copy of the second edition of Gary's 

Dante. 

[The volumes were acquired by the British Museum in October 1877. Tlie 
notes are printed in Dante in English Literature, i. 627-9.] 

Keats, in The Eve of St. Agnes (st. 2), introduces reminiscence of 
Purg. X. 130-4. Leigh Hunt, who printed this poem in his London 
Journal for Jan. 21, 1835, says in a note on this stanza : ' the germ 
of the thought, or something like it, is in Dante, where he speaks 
of the figures that perform the part of sustaining columns in archi- 
tecture '. 

Byron, in canto i of Don Juun (st. 82), introduces reminiscence of 
Inf. xxviii. 115-17 ; and, in canto ii (st. 82-3), refers to Ugolino's 
gnawing of his ' arch-enemy's ' skull {Inf. xxxiii. 76-8) ; the passages 
in question being quoted in the notes. 

Abraham Rees : notice of Dante in vol. xi of the Cyclopaedia ; 
or. Universal Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Literature. 

Sir Richard Colt Hoare, in Classical Tour through Italy and 
Sicily, says Dante's description of the infernal regions would fail 
to convey an adequate idea of the crater of Aetna. 

George Ensor, in Radical Reform, characterizes moderate 
reformers as no better than Dante's neutrals (Inf. iii. 34 ff.). 

William Stewart Rose, in Letters from the North of Italy, quotes 
and translates (in verse) sundry passages from the Commedia, among 
others Dante's taunt against Florence {Purg. vi. 143-4), which he 
applies to the Emperor ; the description of the sun seen through 
mist {Purg. xxx. 25-7) ; and the simile of molten iron {Par. i. 58-60). 
which he applies to Petrarch. 



56 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1819 — continued. 
Keats writes The Fall of Hyperion : A Vision, an attempted 
reconstruction of Hyperion, under the influence (as is supposed) of 
Dante. 

William Clarke, in Reperiorixtm Bibliographicum ; or, some 
Account of the most celebrated British Libraries, registers four MSS. 
of Dante, and nineteen Cent. XV copies of the Commedia, viz. five 
of the edUio princeps, Foligno, 1472 ; two of Venice, 1477 ; two of 
Milan, 1478 ; and ten of Florence, 1481. 

La Divina Commedia di Dante. Niiova edizione corretta da S. E. 
Petronj. (Londra, 3 vols., 16mo.). 

[The third edition of the Commedia, printed and published In England (see 
under 1808).] 

George Crabbe, in Book xii. (' Sir Owen Dale ') of Tales of the 
Hall, gives a rendering (1. 475) of the last line of the inscription over 
the Gate of Hell {Inf. iii. 9). 

1819-20 

Wordsworth, in the sonnet ' Captivity ', introduces (11. 6-7) 
reminiscence of Inf. v. 121-3. 

La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri, illustrata di note da 

Romualdo Zotti. Seconda edizione di nuove osservazioni accresciuta 

e migliorata. (Londra, 3 vols., 12mo.). 

[The fourth edition of the Commedia printed and published in England 
(see above, under 1819). Vol. i is dated 1819 ; vols, ii, iii, 1820.] 

1819-21 
Leigh Hunt, in The Indicator, among other references to Dante, 
quotes and translates (in terza rima) Purg. ii. 10-29 (in No. xv, 
' Mists and Fogs ') ; translates (in prose) Inf. xxvi. 91-142 (in 
No. xvii, ' More News of Ulysses ') ; and paraphrases Inf. xxii. 19-24 
(in No. xxvii. ' Dolphins '). 

c. 1820 
Elizabeth Barrett Barrett : translation {terza rima) of Inf. 
i. 1-27 (printed in Elizabeth Barrett Browning's hitJierto unpublished 
Poems and Stories, ed. H. Buxton Forman, Boston, Mass., 1914, 
i. 133-5 ; priv. pr.). 

Shelley annotates a copy of the Venice 1793 edition of the Opere 
di Dante (5 vols.), containing the Commedia, Canzoniere, and prose 
works (Italian and Latin). 

[These volumes were in the possession of the poet's son, Sir Percy Florence 
Shelley, and eventually passed into the collection of the late Lord Abinger, 
which was dispersed in February 1920. They were priced at £50 in the 
Catalogue (No. 97, May 1920) of G. Winter (52 Charing Cross Road, W.C.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 57 

Lord Grenville : free translation (verse) of Dante's address to 

Virgil {Inf. i. 79-80, 82-4). 

[The lines were preserved by Samuel Rogers in his Commonplace Book 
(see Clayden's Rogers and his Contemporaries, i. 364).] 

Lord TiiuRLOVsr : sonnet on portrait of Dante. 

[See Dante in English Literature, ii. 149.] 

Thomas Medwin, in collaboration with Shelley : translation 

(in terza rima) of ' the Ugolino ' (Inf. xxxiii. 22-75). 

[Printed by Medwin in his Life oj Shelley, ii. 18-22.] 

1820 

Thomas Griffiths Wainewright, in ' Modest Offer of Service 
from Mr. Bonmot ', in London Magazine (Jan.), speaks of ' Dante 
mingling the bitterness of satire \vith the gloomy grandeur of his 
sublime genius ' ; and in ' Sentimentalities on the Fine Arts ', in 
the same (April), he quotes Purg. xvi. 1-5 (in Gary's version), a propos 
of Rembrandt's ' Crucifixion '. 

R. Morehead : On Dante's Purgatorio (in Edinburgh Magazine, 
Feb.). 

Byron, in ' Some Observations upon an Article in Blackwood's 
Magazine', in his Journal (March 15), controverts the writer's 
assertion that ' no great poet ever had immediate fame ', citing 
Dante among other instances. 

In London Magazine (Feb.), in ' Poetry and Prose ', is a notice of 
Byron's tribute to Dante ; and in ' The Spirit of French Criticism ', 
La Harpe's dictum as to the fame of Dante and Milton is quoted. 

Byron, in letter to Murray from Ravenna (March 20), encloses 
his translation ' line for line, in third rhyme ' of ' Francesca of 
Rimini ' (Inf. v. 97-142) ; and in letter to Lady Byron (April 3) 
applies to her the words of Jacopo Rusticucci from Inf. xvi. 43-5. 
[The translation was not published till 1830.] 

W. Cornelius, in a ' Sonnet to Italy ' in London Magazine (May), 
addresses Italy as ' Mother of Dante and Raffaelle '. 

Keats : A Dream (sonnet) (in Indicator, June 28). 
[The sonnet was signed ' Caviare '.] 

In Monthly Magazine (July), Sacchetti's anecdotes of Dante are 
quoted. 

In Quarterly Review (July), Art. v. Pope, in point of creative faculty, 
is classed with Dante and Milton. 

In the New Times (July 19), Keats's diction and sentiment are 
compared with those of Dante. 

[This article has been conjecturally assigned to Lamb.] 



58 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1820 — continued. 

In Quarterly Review (Oct.), Art. iii, it is asked, a propos of Silvio 
Pellico's ' Prancesca da Rimini ', why should not Dante be to the 
Italians what Homer was to the Greek tragedians ? 

Shelley : translation (in verse) of the first canzone of the Convivio 
(' Voi che intendendo ') ; and (in terza rima) of Purg. xxviii. 1-61 
(' Matilda gathering Flowers '). In this year was published Prometheus 
Unbound, in the preface to which Shelley justifies his employment 
of imagery ' drawn from the operations of the human mind, or from 
those external actions by which they are expressed ', by the examples 
of Dante and Shakespeare. In the poem itself (i. 752-5) he introduces 
reminiscence of Inf. v. 74, 82-4, and translates (iii. iv. 136) Inf. 
iii. 9. 

W. RoscOE : translation (verse) of ballaia of Dante (' lo mi son 
pargoletta '). 

[In letter from Chat Moss, in Life, ii. 246-7.] 

Charles Lamb, in ' Christ's Hospital five and tJiirty years ago ', 
in Essays of Elia, compares the ' pale and frightened features ' of 
a boy undergoing punishment to the ' disfigurements in Dante '. 

H. FusELi, in Lectures on Painting, says {Lect. iv) that ' the 
Ugolino, the Paolo and Francesca of Dante ', among other subjects, 
' owe the sympathies they call forth to their assimilating power, and 
not to the names they bear ' ; in Lect. v he refers to the description 
of the Frati Godenti (Inf. xxiii. 58 ft.) ; and in Lect. xi speaks of 
the influence of Dante on Michael Angelo. 

Shelley : The Tower of Famine (in terza rima) (suggested by 
Inf. xxxiii. 23). 

W. Hazlitt, in Lectures on the Literature of the Age of Elizabeth, 
says {Lect. i) that Dante, and other Italian authors, were familiar to 
English writers of that period ; in Lect. vii he describes the title of 
the Divina Commedia as a ' misnomer '. 

W. S. Landoe, in De Cultu atque Usu Latini Sermonis, raises the 
question as to Latin translations of Dante and Boccaccio ; instances 
the surpassing excellence of Dante's ' Ugolino ' and Alfieri's ' Brutus '; 
argues against the modernization of spelling in the case of Dante, 
among others ; and speaks of the green oases in the parched deserts 
of Dante. 

William Archibald Cadell, in A Journey in Carniola, Italy, 
and France, in the Years 1817, 1818, mentions Dante's portrait in the 
cathedral at Florence, describes his tomb at Ravenna, and quotes 
his remark on the number of Italian dialects from the De Vulgari 
Eloquentia (i. 10). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 59 

Peter Bayley, in Sketches from St. George's Fields (a series of 
poems published under the pseudonym of ' Giorgione di Castel Chiuso '), 
prints as motto on the title-page Gary's rendering of Inf. iii. 9, and 
introduces in Part ii (11. 54-69) simile from Inf. ii. 130 ff., and 
(U. 144-58) reminiscence of Inf. iii. 25-8). 

T. B. Defferrari, in Selections of Classic Italian Poetry, prints 
(vol. ii, pp. 1-201) the following extracts from the Comniedia, viz. 
Inf. i-x, xiii, xxvi. 76-142 (' the narrative of Ulysses '), xxxiii. 1-88 
('the episode of Ugolino'); and Par. iii, xvii. 19-142 ('prediction 
of misfortunes to Dante '), xxiv. 34-154 (' Dante's Profession of 
Faith '). 

Bryan Waller Procter (' Barry Cornwall '), in Marcian Colonna, 
speaks of the fame of Dante as being eternal as the stars. 

Henry Matthews, in his Diary of an Invalid, among other 
references to Dante quotes his description of Charon {Inf. iii. 109-11) 
as having probably suggested Michael Angelo's figure of Charon in 
his ' Last Judgment '. 

John Payne Collier, in the seventh conversation of his Poetical 
Decameron, refers to Dante's use of the term ' tragedia ' in Inf. xx. 
113, and quotes his application of it from the De Vulgari Eloquentia 
(ii. 4, 11. 39-41). 

Alfred Tennyson, in letter (written at the age of eleven) to his 
aunt, quotes a passage from the beginning of Samson Agonistes 
which, he says, puts him in mind of that in Dante {Inf. v. 121-3), 
which Byron prefixed to his Corsair. 

In Retrospective Review (vol. ii. Art. i) Sir Philip Sidney's ' fairy 
pencil ' is contrasted with the ' gloomy colouring ' of Dante. 

1821 

Ugo Foscolo, in Quarterly Review (Jan.), Art. xi, compares the 
lyrical poetry of Petrarch and Dante. 

Mrs. Shelley, in her Journal at Pisa (Jan. 31-Feb. 12), records 
that Shelley was reading the Vita Nuova aloud to her. 

Shelley, in the last draft of the ' Advertisement ' to Epipsyclddion, 
compares the poem to the Vita Nuova, from which he quotes § 25, 
11. 106-11, and prefixes as motto his translation of the envoi of Dante's 
canzone, ' Voi che intendendo '. In the poem itself he introduces 
sundry reminiscences of the Coinmedia ; cf. 11. 160-1 and Purg. xv. 
60-75 ; 1. 249 and Inf. i. 1 ff. ; 1. 321 and Inf. i. 2 ; 11. 410-1 1 and 
Purg. i. 131. 

Byrox, in his Journal at Ravenna (Jan. 29), protests against 
ScWegel's criticisms of Dante, especially his statement that Dante's 



60 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1821 — continued. 
' chief defect is a want of gentle feelings ' ; in letter to Murray 
(Feb. 7), on W. L. Bowles's strictures on Pope, he says that the 
subject of religion ' has failed in all human hands except Milton's 
and Dante's ' ; in letter to T. Moore from Pisa (Nov. 16) he highly 
praises Taaffe's commentary on the Cotnmedia. 

Thomas Medwin, in Journal of the Conversations of Lord Byr<yn 
at Pisa, records (under Nov. 20) a number of Byron's remarks upon 
Dante. 

Byron : The Prophecy of Dante (in terza rirna). 

[This poem was written in 1819, but not published till this year (see under 
1819, Oct. 29).] 

Byron, in canto ill of Don Juan (st. 10-11), says ' Dante's Beatrice 
and Milton's Eve Were not drawn from their spouses ', and dissents 
from the commentators' view ' that Dante meant tlieology By 
Beatrice, and not a mistress ' ; and translates (st. 108) Purg. viii, 
1-6 ; in canto iv (st. 103-5) he contrasts the condition of the monu- 
ment to Gaston de Foix at Ravenna and Dante's tomb. 

Clara Clairmont, in her Journal (April 12), likens her yearning 
for her child Allegra to that of Dante for the lost cantos of the 
Commedia. 

Y. : translation {terza rima) of Inferno v. (in Edinburgh Magazine, 
May). 

Shelley, in letter to Charles Oilier from Pisa (June 16), sends 
printed specimens of Taaffe's coinmentary and translation of the 
Commedia, and begs that he will arrange for the publication of the 
work in England ; in letter to John Gisborne from Lerici (June 
18), he speaks of the neglected beauties of the Purgatorio and 
Paradise. 

In Quarterly Review (July), Art. vi, Cary is referred to as having 
' opened to us the wild and romantic recesses of Dante's Vision '. 

Shelley, in The Boat on the Serchio (July), echoes (st. 4) Dante's 
description of Monte San Gitiliano (Inf. xxxii. 29-30) ; in letter to 
Mrs. Shelley from Ravenna (Aug. 15) he describes Dante's tomb and 
portrait in relief ; in letter to C. Oilier from Pisa (Sept. 25) he remarks 
that the national character of the Italians is much the same as in 
the time of Dante. 

Wordsworth, in letter to W. S. Landor (Sept. 3), mentions 
a Latin translation of the Commedia, and rejoices that Dante did 
not write the poem in Latin. 

SouTHEY, in A Vision of Judgment, says (in ' The Trance ') secrets 
shall be unfolded to the reader ' such as of yore the Florentijie saw ' ; 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 61 

and (ill ' The Gate of Heaven ') imitates the inscription over the 
Gate of Hell {Inf. iii. 1-9). 

Lamb, in ' Witches, and other Night Fears ', in Essays of Elia, 
speaks of ' the cruel, tormenting, defined devils in Dante '. 

Peter Bayi.ey, in the second series of Sketches from St. George's 
Fields, prints Itif. iii. 9 as motto on the title-page, and introduces 
in the Introduction (11. 50-5) paraphrase of Inf. iii. 109-12, and in 
Part i. (11. 105-18) translation of Itif. iii. 1-9, and in Part vi. (1. 212) 
reminiscence of Inf. i. 99. 

Shelley, in A Defence of Poetry, gives a lengthy appreciation of 
Dante, in the course of which he says, ' Dante's Vita Nuova is an 
inexhaustible fountain of purity of sentiment and language. . . . His 
apotheosis of Beatrice in Paradise ... is the most glorious imagination 
of modern poetry ' ; while the Paradiso he describes as ' a perpetual 
hymn of everlasting love ', ranking it abo^ e the Purgaiorio, as he 
does the Purgatorio above the Inferno. 

Thomas Campbell, in Lectures on Poetry, emphasizes the impor- 
tance of Dante's style and diction as elements in his influence on 
Italian language and literature. 

A. Pozzesi, in Vocabulaire Poetique . . . suivi d'un Choix des plus 
beaux Morceaux de Poesie tires de la Divine Comedie du Dante avec 
la traduction frangaise (Lond. and Batli), prints, besides numerous 
illustrative quotations from the Commedia, the following selections 
from the Inferno, Italian text with French translation, viz. Inf. iii. 
1-11 ; V. 82-142 ; xxv. 46-114, 118-41 ; xxxiii. 1-90. 

Lady Mokgan, in Italy, quotes numerous passages from the 
Commedia, several of wliich she translates in verse ; in an appendix 
is an examination, by Sir T. C. Morgan, of the claim that Dante 
founded the Italian language. 

Shelley, hi On the Devil, and Devils, contrasts the devils of Dante 
and Tasso with that of Milton ; and remarks how few read the 
Purgatorio or Paradiso, compared with those who are familiar with 
the Inferno, which, with the exception of two famous passages 
(the Francesca and the Ugolino), he considers inferior to the 
Purgatorio. 

In Retrospective Review (vol. iii, Art. iii) Tasso is compared with 
Dante and Ariosto ; (Art. vi) imitations of Dante by Pulci are 
pointed out ; (vol. iv, Art. ii) reference is made to Dante's knowledge 
of Proven9al. 

In New Monthly Magazine (vols, i-ii) are numerous references to 
Dante, and an anonymous translation (in heroic couplets) (vol. ii, 
pp. 327-8) of the Ugolino episode {Inf. xxxiii. 1-78) ; Dante's address 



62 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1821 — -continued. 
to Virgil {Inf. ii. 140) is applied (as by a botanist) to Linnaeus 
(vol. ii, p. 369). 

William Henry Worthington : engraving of portrait of Dante, 
after Raphael Morghen. 

1821-2 

Sir S. E. Brydges, in Res Literariae, in ' Life and Writings of 

Petrarch ' (i. 2 ff.), makes frequent mention of Dante, with critical 

remarks on the Commedia, the first idea of which he thuiks ' was 

probably suggested by a dream, combined with a celebrated passage 

in Virgil '. 

c. 1822 

Elizabeth, Duchess of Devonshire, projects at Rome an edition 

de luxe in folio of the Divina Commedia, with 100 illustrations. 

[See Colomb de Batines, Bibliografia Dantesca, i. 201. The project was 
frustrated by the death of the Duchess in 1824.] 

W. S. Landor : ' Dantes Caenotaphium Ligneum ' (in Poemxiia et 
Inscriptiones). 

1822 

In London Magazine (Jan.), in ' Sketches on the Road ' (vi), 
Dante's reference to Monte San Giuliano {Inf. xxxiii. 28-30) is quoted ; 
(May) in ' The School for Scandal ' Lady Teazle is described as 
' the Divina Commedia of womanhood ' ; (July) in ' On Magazine 
Writers ', Dante's lines on those careless of fame {Inf. xxiv. 50-1) 
are applied to ephemeral writers. 

Byron, in letters to Murray and T. Moore from Pisa (Jan. 22 ; 
March 6, 8), urges the publication of Taaffe's Commentary on Dante. 

H. F. Gary, in ' The Early French Poets ', in the London Magazine 
(Feb.), remarks on the use of Dante's metre, the terza rima, by English 
poets ; and (March) quotes Joachim du Bellay's mention of Dante ; 
(Oct.) he announces the discovery of the MS. of the ' Vision of 
Alberico ' at Monte Cassino, a work from which Dante is supposed 
to have taken the idea of the Commedia, and its approaching 
publication. 

W. Hazlitt, in ' The Fight ', in New Monthly Magazine (Feb.), 
likens Hickman, after a blow in the face from Neate, to ' one of the 
figures in Dante's Inferno '. 

In Quarterly Review (April), Art. ii, attention is drawn to Dante's 
apparent fondness for ' hiatus ' ; and (July), Art. vi, reference is 
made to Dante's representation of the solicitude of the damned in 
Hell as to their fame on earth. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 68 

Siu Walter Scott, in chapters 27, 28, of The Fortunes of Nigel, 
compares the Traitor's Gate in the Tower of London to the entrance 
to Dante's Hell. 

John Taaffe : A Comment on the Divine Comedy of Dante 
Alifjhieri. (Lond.) 

[This work, which was issued anonymously, was printed at Pisa from the 
types of Didot, and published in London by Murray. Both Byron and 
Shelley thought well of the ciommentary, but the translation (in octo- 
syllabie terza ritim) was a sorry performance. The commentary contains 
sundry translations from the Vita Nuoim and Convivio. The work, of 
which only the first volume appeared, was severely handled by Cary in 
the London Magazine for March and April 1823 ; it was also reviewed in 
the Monthly Review for Nov. 1823.] 

T. F. DiBDiN, in the Supplement to his Bibliof.heca Spenceriana 
(1815), registers three additional Cent. XV editions of the Commedia, 
viz. Venice, 1478 ; Venice, 1491 (Petro Cremonese) ; and Venice, 
1493. 

Thomas Roscoe, in note to the English translation of the Memoirs 
of Benvenuto Cellini, discusses Cellini's statement that ' Dante and 
Giotto were together in France, and visited Paris ' ; and mentions 
Giotto's portrait of Dante in the Chapel of the Podesta, at Florence. 

Charles Mills, in Travels of Theodore Ducas (i. 200 ff.), gives 
a lengthy analysis of the Commedia, with numerous extracts from 
the Italian text, some of them (including the Ugolino episode, Inf. 
xxxii. 126-xxxiii. 78) accompanied by prose renderings. 

T. G. Wainewright, in ' The Delicate Intricacies ', in London 
Magazine (July), applies Cary's version of Inf. iii. 64 to those who 
have never studied the Parma Correggios, and refers to Dante as 
' the noble Ghibelline '. 

T. L. Peacock, in chapter 10 of Maid Marian, parodies Inf. xxviii. 
12 k propos of Robin Hood and Little John. 

Shelley, in The Triumph of Life, refers to the Commedia as ' the 
rhyme Of him who from the lowest depths of hell. Through every 
paradise and through all glory, Love letl serene, and who returned 
to tell The words of hate and awe ; the wondrous story How all 
things are transfigured except Love ' (11. 471 -6) ; and introduces 
many reminiscences of the poem ; e. g. cf. 11. 7-8 and Purg. xxviii. 
14-17 ; II. 182 ff. and Inf. xiii. 25 ff. ; 11. 315-16 and Purg. xxviii. 
25-7 ; 11. 375-6 and Purg. xxviii. 14-18 ; 1. 416 and Purg. i. 19 ; 
11. 448-9 and Purg. xxviii. 41-2 ; 11. 528-9 and Inf. iii. 112-14. 
[The poem was not published till 1824.] 

In New Monthly Magazine, in ' Modern Pilgrimages ', the experi- 
ence of Genius is compared to that of Dante, in that it must visit 



64 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1822 — continued. 
the infernal regions of oblivion, ere it can reach the paradise of 
lasting fame (iv. 220) ; in ' Italian Poets, No. i ', reference is made 
to Michael Angelo's indebtedness to Dante as poet and artist (iv. 
843-5) ; in ' The Confessional ', Francesca's story of her love is 
touched upon, Ivf. y. 121-3, 139-42, being quoted and translated 
in verse (iv. 351 ) ; in ' Italian Poets, No. ii ', the episode of Pier delle 
Vigne from Iiif. xiii. is quoted in Gary's translation (iv. 435, 461-2) ; 
in ' Italian Poets, No. iii ', Dante's estimates of the poems of Guido 
Cavalcanti and Guido Guinieelli and of his own (Purg. xi. 97-102, 
115-16; xxvi. 112-14) are quoted in Gary's translation (v. 1 ff.) ; 
in ' The Poetry of Life ', the penalties of Inf. iii. 87 are invoked on 
those who are dead to the poetry of life and feeling (v. 163-4) ; in 
' Foreign Varieties ', the commemoration at Rome of the fifth 
centenary of Dante's death is described (vi. 117-18), and an account 
is given of the ' Vision of Alberico ' to which Dante is supposed to 
have been indebted (vi. 454). 

1822-3 

La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri. (Londra, 2 vols., 

82mo.) 

[Printed by Corrall, published by Pickering; dedicated to George John, 
Earl Spencer. This is tlie fifth edition of the Commedia printed and 
published in England, and the first in which no foreigner's name appears.] 

In The Liberal. Verse and Prose from tlie South (written by Byron, 
Leigh Hunt, and Hazlitt) are numerous references to Dante, to 
whom the editors pay homage in their preface ; viz. Pisa and Dante 
(i. 99 ff.) ; Can Grande and Dante (in st. 27 of ' The Dogs ') (i. 235) ; 
Dante's diet (ii. 63-4) ; the opening of the Commedia (ii. 102-3) ; 
Dante's mention (Inf. xxvi. 28-32) of fire-flies (ii. 258) ; Dante's 
saying in the De Vulgari Eloquetiiia (i. 13, 11. 48-32) about the 
Genoese and the letter z (ii. 258) ; Villani and Dante (ii. 285-6, 
295-7). 

Robert Graves : portrait of Dante, after Raphael Morghen, 

engraved as frontispiece to vol. i. of Pickering's diamond edition of 

the Divina Commedia. 

1823 

In Quarterly Review (Jan.), Art. v, it is held that in invention 
Dante is far below many poets, particularly Milton, and that in 
spite of the ' nvajestic beauties ' of some passages of the Inferno, the 
tediousness of the Commedia as a whole is such as to make the 
reading of the poem ' a task '. 

In Blackwood's Magazine (Fieb.), in ' Of Dante, and his Times ', 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 65 

stress is laid on Dante's imagination and power of expression, in 
which respects he is compared with Shakespeare. 

H- F. Cary, in London Magazine (March, April), reviews Taafte's 
' Comment on the Divine Comedy ' ; and (May), Foscolo's ' Essays 
on Petrarch ', in which he speaks of Gray's appreciation of Dante, 
and contrasts the merits of Dante and Petrarch ; (Aug.) he refers 
to the numerous recent editions of Dante in Italy ; (Nov.) he men- 
tions letters of Guittone d' Arezzo to persons named by Dante ; and 
(Dec.) remarks on Dante's (supposed) silence with regard to Lapo 
Gianni. 

Alan Cunnikgham, in letter to Cary (June 30), expresses his deep 
appreciation of Dante, which he owes to Cary's translation. 

W. Taylok, in MotUhly Review (Aug.), draws a parallel between 
Dante and Petrarch, as men and poets. 

In Quarterly Review (Oct.), Art. ii, the question as to Dante's 
knowledge of Homer is discussed. 

In Monthly Review (Nov.), in review of Taaffe's ' Comment on the 
Divine Comedy ', Dante and Homer arc ranked together as the two 
supreme poets of the world. 

Mrs. Shelley, in Valperga, or Tlie Life and Adventures ofCastruccio, 
Prince of Lucca, introduces numerous references to, and quotations 
from, Dante. 

Isaac D'Israeli, in vol. iv. of Curiosities of Literature, discusses 
at length the question as to ' The origin of Dante's Inferno ', and 
relates the anecdote of Cecco d' Ascoli and Dante's cat : in vol. v., 
in ' The Philosophy of Proverbs ', he quotes instances of proverbs 
used by Dante. 

Ugo Foscolo, in Essays on Petrarch, includes a lengthy comparison 
between Petrarch • and Dante, in the course of which he quotes 
numerous passages from the works of both. 

T. ¥. DiBDiN, in his Descriptive Catalogue of Books printed in the 
Fifteenth Century, from the library of the Duke di Cassano Serra, 
belonging to Earl Spencer, registers two additional Cent. XV editions 
of the Divina Commedia, viz. Naples, 1477 ; and Venice, 1484 ; 
making a total of ten Cent. XV editions in the Althorp Library (see 
under 1815, 1822). 

[The whole of these are now in the John Rylands Library at Manchester.] 

Thomas Roscoe : translation {terza rima) of the Ugollno episode 
(/«/. xxxiii. 1-75) (in Historical View, of the Literature of the South of 
France, from the French of Sismondi. i. 399-404). 

C. Johnston : Alfieri at the tomb of Dante (sonnet) (in Sonnets, 
Original and Translated. Lond.). 



66 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1823 — continued. 
W. S. Rose, in translation of Berni's Orlando Innamorato, points 
out Berni's imitation of Purg. i. 1-2 at the beginning of his second 
book. 

William Coxe, in Sketches of the Lives ofCorreggio and Parmegiano, 
illustrates the term ' Corrigesque ' smile by a reference to Inf. v. 133. 
Lady Blessington, under this year, in her Journal of the Con- 
versations of Lord Byron at Genoa (pub. in 1834), records sundry 
quotations of Byron from the Commedia on fame and on the memory 
of past happiness. 

Byron, in The Age of Bronze (st. 9), refers to Dante's refuge with 
Can Grande at Verona ; in canto vi. of Don Juan (st. 85), he speaks 
of a ' wood obscure, like that where Dante found Himself ' ; in 
canto vii. (st. 3) he protests that in his satirical expressions he has 
said ' no more than has been said in Dante's Verse, and by Solomon 
and by Cervantes ' ; in canto x. (st. 27) he speaks of ' grim Dante's 
obscure wood '. 

W. S. Landor, in Imaginary Conversations (' Southey and Person '), 
says that there are hundreds of lines without force, feeling, or 
fancy, or beauty of any kind, in Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, and 
Milton, 

In New Monthly Magazine, in ' The Troubadours ', reference is 
made to Dante's mentions of Thibaut of Navarre {Vulg. Eloq., i. 9 ; 
ii. 5, 6), and the Troubadours. 

In Retrospective Review (vol. vii. Art. x), while ' the originality and 
majesty of Homer, the grace of Virgil, and the terrible strength of 
Dante ' are admitted, it is contended that they are all surpassed by 
Shakespeare. 

1823-31 
W. S. Rose, in notes to The Orlando Furioso Translated into 
English Verse, points out many passages in which Ariosto was 
indebted to Dante. 

c. 1824 
Frances A. Kemble (Mrs. Butler), in Record of a Girlhood (pub. 
in 1878), mentions her early study of Dante under Biagioli in Paris, 
to which she owed her life-long admiration of the Commedia, 

1824 

Wordsworth, in letters to W. S. Landor (Jan.), praises Dante's 

style, as ' admirable for conciseness and vigour without abruptness ', 

but owns that he found the fictions often ' offensively grotesque and 

fantastic ', and the poem itself ' tedious ' ; and he refers to a copy 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 67 

of the Bodoni (Parma, 1795) edition of the Commedia presented to 

him by John Kenyon. 

John Charles Tarver : L'Enfer de Dante Alighieri, traduit en 

fran<jais, accompagne de notes explicatives, &c. (Londres, 2 vols.) 

[Reviewed in KniglWs Quarterly Magazine (Aug.) ; and London Magazine 
(Nov.).] 

Sir F. a. Barnard, in BibliotJwcae Regiae Catalogus, registers 
seven Cent. XV editions of the Commedia, inchiding the editio 
princeps (Foligno, 1472) ; the editiones principes of the Convivio 
(1490), Vul^. Eloq. (1529), and Vita Nuova (1576) ; and a copy on 
vellum of the Aldine Commedia of 1502. 

W. Hazlitt, in ' On the Fine Arts ', in Encyclopaedia Britannica, 
criticizes Sir Joshua Reynolds's attempt to depict ' Dante's Count 
Ugolino, one of the most grand, terrific, and appalling characters 
in modern fiction '. 

Byron, in canto xvi. of Don Juan (st. 116), .speaks of a door 
opening ' with a most infernal creak. Like that of hell. " Lasciate 
ogni speranza Voi ch' entrate ! " the hinge seemed to speak. Dreadful 
as Dante's rhima, or this stanza '. 

T. F. DiBDiN, in The Library Companion, under ' Italian Poetry ', 
specifies the most ' desirable ' editions of the Commedia. 

W. S. Landor, in Imaginary Conversations (' Abbe Delille and 
W. Landor '), records Voltaire's alleged preference of Ariosto, ' whom 
he had never read,' to Dante ; and (' Alfleri and Salomon the 
Florentine Jew ') by the mouth of Salomon criticizes the defects 
of Dante, but asserts that in his Commedia ' there are more thoughts 
highly poetical, there is more reflection, and the nobler properties 
of mind and intellect are brought into more intense action, not only 
than in the whole course of French poetry, but also in the whole 
of Continental : nor do I think (I must here speak with hesitation) 
that any one drama of Shakespeare contains so many '. 

Lord Grenville : Latin elegiac version of Par. xvii. 55-60 (in 
Nugae Metricae, priv. pr.). 

Y. : Dante (in Martin McDermot's Beauties of Modern Literature. 
Lond.). 

Sketch of the life of Dante, account of his minor works, and 
numerous quotations from the Commedia, in Historical Life of Joanna 
of Sicily {i. 79 n.). 

Richard Price, in notes to revised edition of Warton's History 
of Poetry, quotes (ii. 67, n.) Dante's remarks on tragedy and comedy 
in the letter to Can Grande (Epist. x. 196-9, 203-5), and in the 
De Vulgari Eloquentia (ii. 4, 11. 38-40, 41-3, 44-6) 



68 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1824 — continued. 
Susan Edmonstone Ferrieb, in The Inheritance, prefixes mottoes 
from Dante (in Gary's version) in vol. i, to eh. 20 (Inf. xix. 39), 
ch. 22 (Purg. XX. 145-9), ch. 48 {Par. x. 22-5) ; in vol. ii, to eh. 40 
(Par. xvii. 61-3). 

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Criticisms on the Principal 
Italian Writers (in Knight's Quarterly Magazine). No. i. Dante. 
In No. ii. Petrarch, he emphasizes Dante's power of description, 
which he says ' in the Divine Comedy is displayed in its highest 
perfection ' ; and asserts the impossibilitj'' of the poem ever becoming 
hackneyed. 

Arthur Henry Hallam : translation of the Ugolino episode from 
Dante into Greek iambics. 

[This translation, which was written as an * Eton exercise ', when Hallam 
was only thirteen, was printed in his Remains in Verse and Prose (1834), 
issued privately by his father.] 

Coleridge, in letter to H. F. Gary (Dec. 14), whom he describes 
as ' Dante's English Duplicate and Re-incarnation ', begs him to 
read the MS. of Gabriele Rossetti's ' Comento Analitico ' on the 
Divina Commedia. 

In Retrospective Review (vol. x. Art. viii), the vigorous language of 
Hans Sachs in his denunciations is palliated by comparison with 
that of Dante, who ' in the Inferno rebukes the vices of popes and 
kings, and Pisans and Florentines, in language of no studied sweet- 
ness '. 

Anne Beaumont : oil paintings of ' Rachel ' and ' Beatrice ' 
(Brit; Inst., Nos. 29, 344). 

1824-7 
William Blake : ninety-eight coloured, or partly coloured, 
designs from the Divina Commedia (68 from the Inferno, 20 from the 
Purgatorio, 10 from the Paradiso), besides four uncoloured drawings 
and a diagram of the Circles of Hell, executed as commission from 
John Linnell. 

[These were intended to be engraved, but Blake engraved only seven of 
the designs from the Inferno (see under 1827). A list of the whole, witli 
descriptions, by W. M. Rossetti, is printed in Gilchrist's Life of Blake, 
ii. 216-23, 246, 249.] 

1825 

H. F. Cary, in letter to Rev. T. Price (Jan. 8), says Gabriele 
Rossetti has been staying with him, ' who thinks he has made great 
discoveries as to the political allusions in Dante . . . which I am 
inclined to believe not altogether visionary ' ; and in letter, in same 
month, to Rossetti himself he recommends the publication of his 
work, and advises him as to practical details. 



IN LITEKATUllE AND ART !B9 

Jank Baillik Welsh (aft. Mrs. Carlyle), in letter to Thomas 
Carlyle (Jan. 13), a propos of a project of his, (mis)quotes from Inf. 
xxviii. 107, the saying ' Capo lia cosa fatta '. 

In Quarterly Review (March), Art. i, high praise is given to Hayiey's 
terza rima translation of Inf. i-iii (see under 1782). 

In Edinburgh Review (April), Art. ii, Dante and Milton are com- 
pared. 

Henry Brougham, in Inaugural Discourse as Lord Rector of the 
University of Glasgow, dwells on the conciseness of Dante's style, 
many instances of which he quotes from the Commedia. 

John Keble, in ' Sacred Poetry ', in Quarterly Review (June), 
compares Milton's description of Heaven with Dante's, which he 
say% is ' as simple as possible in its imagery, producing intense effect 
by little more than various combinations of three leading ideas — 
light, motion, and music '. 

Leigh Hunt, in ' Criticism of Female Beauty '. in New Monthly 
Magazine (July -Aug.), quotes and translates several passages from 
a canzone (' lo miro i crespi e gli biondi capegli ') in his day attributed 
to Dante. 

Mac.\i LAY. in ' Essay on Milton ', in Edinburgh Review (Aug.), 
compares in detail the poetical methods of Milton and Dante. 

Sir Walter Scott, in letter to W. S. Rose (Oct. 12), expresses his 
willingness to subscribe for an edition of Dante, ' on condition you 
do not insist on my reading him '. 

H. C. Robinson, in his Diary (Dec. 10, 17), records Blake's con- 
versations on Dante, whom he describes as ' an atheist — a mere 
politician, busied about this world '. 

W. Hazlitt, in TJie Spirit of the Age, remarks on Wordsworth's 
' strong predilection for such geniuses as Dante and Michael Angelo '. 

C. Mills, in his History of Chivalry, quotes (ii. 338) Dante's refer- 
ence to tournaments [Inf. xxii. 5-6). 

Sir S. E. Brydges, in Recollections of Foreign Travel, among other 
references to Dante remarks (Lett. 8) that ' all the fuiest notes of 
Milton have their prelude in Dante ' : and (Lett. 41) that wisdom 
and sinceritj' arc the characteristics of Dante, as of other great 
poets. 

Ugo Foscolo : Discorso sul Testo e sn le Opinioni diverse pre- 

valenti intorno alia Storia e alia Emendazione critica della Commedia 

di Dante. (Londra.) 

[Published by Pickering, with dedication to Hudson Gurney. Tliis is the 
first vohime of a projected commentary on tlie Commedia of which no 
more was issued in Foscolo's lifetime. The complete work, edited by 
Mazzini, was eventually published in 1842-3.] 



70 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1825^ — continued. 

\V. SoTHEBY, in poem on Florence, in Italy and other Poems, reflects 
on the absence of any monument in Florence to Dante, or of any 
memorial of him other than the so-called ' Sasso di Dante '. 

T. RoscoE, in The Italian Novelists, among other references to 
Dante, quotes (i. 62) the line ' Galeotto fu il libro e chi lo scrisse ' 
{Inf. V. 137) in connexion with the title of ' II Principe Galeotto ' 
sometimes given to the Decameron. 

Robert Hall, as recorded in O. Gregory's Memoir of him (1882), 
relates to a friend how he had been led to study Italian, in order to 
read the Commedia, by Macaulay's parallel between Milton and 
Dante in the Edinburgh Review (Aug.). 

George Crabb : notice of Dante, and the Commedia (' a species 
of satiric epic '), in Universal Historical Dictionury. 

Edgar Taylor, in Lays of the Minnesingers or German Troubadours 
of the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries, quotes Dante's opinion of 
Arnaut Daniel {Purg. xxvi. 118-19), and assumes that the Romance 
of Lancelot read by Paolo and Francesca {Inf. v. 127 ff.) was written 
in Proven9al by Arnaut (pp. 28-4) ; he also quotes (in Gary's transla- 
tion) Dante's tribute in the De Vulgari Eloquentia (i. 12, 11. 20-85) 
to the Emperor Frederick and Manfred as patrons of vernacular 
poetry. 

George Procter, in his History of Italy, quotes with approval 
Dante's denunciation of Pisa {Inf. xxxiii. 79-90), and gives an 
account of his exile, and of the circumstances of the composition of 
the Commedia (i. 4). 

R. DuppA : drawing of the Tomb of Dante at Ravenna (engraved 
as illustration to his Miscellaneous Observations and Opinions on the 
Continent). 

1826 

W. Hazlitt, in ' Of Persons one would Wish to Have Seen ', in 
New Monthly Magazine (Jan.), says ' Dante is the onl^ one of the 
Italian poets I should care much to see '. 

In Literary Gazette, and Journal of tJie Belles Lettres (Jan.), an 
account is given of G. Rossetti's alleged 'important and extraordinary 
discovery ' with regard to the hidden meaning of the Commedia. 

H. C. Robinson, in letter to Miss Wordsworth (Feb.), says that 
Blake claims to receive visits from Dante and other great spirits, ' and 
has given me repeatedly their very words in their conversations ' ; 
and that he holds that Dante, though an atheist, was ij^spired by 
the Holy Ghost. 

In Quarterly Revieio (March), Art. ix, the originality of Dante and 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 71 

Ariosto is discussed ; (June), Art. i, a propos of Gary's translation 
reference is made to ' the austere character, the over-mastered 
feeling, the dignity and the majestic repose ' of the Commedia. 

In European Magazine (May), ' La Pia, an Italian Romance ' 
(based on Purg. v. 130-6) by B. Sestini is reviewed. 

In Westminster Reviezo (Oct.), Art. viii, Dante's simile of doves 
{Inf. V. 82 ff.) is illustrated by a passage from Propertius. 

Anna Brownell Jameson, in her Diary of an Ennuyee at Florence, 
quotes (Nov. 8) Dante's description of Florence in the Convivio 
(i. 3, 11. 21-2) as ' la bellissima e famosissima figlia di Roma ' ; and 
(Nov. 15) records the singing by Magnelli of the recitative which 
introduces Desdemona's song in Othello from Inf. v. 121-3. 

R. MoREHEAD : sonnet to Dante (' The Bard most powerful and 
original Of any of the sons of Poesy ') (in Memorials of Rev. R. More- 
head, p. 308). 

W. S. Landok, hi lines to H. F. Gary on his appointmentas Assistant 
Keeper' of Printed Books at the British Museum, says ' Garey, I fear 
the fruits are scanty Thou gatherest from the fields of Dante . . . 
Dante's long labyrinthine line Is straiten'd and drawn tight by thine.' 

VV. Hazlitt, in ' The New School of Reform ', in The Plain Speaker 
(Essay 17), says the new Political Millennium ' resembles Dante's 
Inferno — who enters there must leave all hope behind ' ; in Notes 
of a Journey through France and Italy, among other references to 
Dante, in ch. 20 he relates, after Beyle's version, the story of La Pia 
from Purg. v. 130-6. 

John L.\tham : The Story of Count Ugolino (translation in terza 
rima of Inf. xxxiii. 1-75) (in Poems Original and Translated, Sand- 
bach. 1836). 

John Browning, in The History of Tuscany ; from the Italian of 
Lorenzo Pignotti, remarks (after his author) that Dante should be 
judged b}' comparison with his predecessors (i. 251-2) ; emphasizes 
the perennial freshness of Dante (i. 259) ; criticizes Gray's rendering 
of Purg. viii. 5-6 in the Elegy {i. 263-4) ; compares Dante and 
Michael Angelo (ii. 160-1); in a criticism of Dante's minor works 
censures the ' weak prose ' and ' middling verse ' of the Vita Nuova 
(ii. 165-8). 

Richard Ryan, in Poetry and Poets, relates two anecdotes of 
Dante at the court of Gan Grande at Verona (ii. 218-19 ; iii. 169-71). 
In Janus ; or, the Edinburgh Literary Almanack, the Commedia is 
compared with Paradise Lost (i. 180-3). 

Elizabeth B. Barrett, in preface to An Essay on Mind, numbers 
' the sublime Dante ' among authors of intellectual poetry ; and in 



72 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1826 — continued. 
the poem itself (Bk. i, 11. 19-40), in a passage on the various disposi- 
tions of different minds, imagines the themes of Dante and Petrarch 
exchanged. 

' A Late Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge ' : An Attempt at 
an English Translation, in terza ritna, of the first canto of Dante's 
Inferno, &c., &c. (Lond., priv. pr., 1832). 

[The author of this translation, which is dated from Pisa, Dec. 29, 1826, 
has been identified with Jonathan Hatfield (Scholar of Trinity, 1815 ; 
B.A., 1817 ; M.A., 1820).] 

Emma Eleonora Kendrick : water-colour of ' Captive Hugolino, 

after Sir Joshua Reynolds ' (Soc. Brit. Artists, No. 627). 

1826-7 

Gabriele Rossetti : La Diviiia Commedia di Dante Alighieri, 

con Comento analitico, in sei volumi. (Londra.) 

[Published by Murray. Only two volumes, comprising the Inferno, saw 
the light. \\.M.Hosse.tti,in Gabriele Rossetti : A Versifled Autobiography, 
writes (pp. 63-6) : ' The great majority of the comment on the Purgatorio 
was written — not any of that on the Paradiso. . . . Rossetti regarded 
Dante as a member, both in politics and religion, of an occult society, 
having a close relation to what we now call Freemasonry ; and he opined 
that the Commedia and other writings of Dante . . . are of similar internal 
significance.'] 

Kenelm Henry Digby, in The Broad Stone of Honour, among 
numerous other references to Dante, refers to his love for the old 
romances (' Godefridus,' § 12) ; to his avoidance of the name of 
Christ in the Inferno (' Morus ') ; and to his respect for the arbitra- 
ment of the duel in the De Monarchia (' Orlandu.s,' § 8). 

1827 

Antonio Panizzi : Foscolo's ' Discorso sul testo della Commedia ' 
(in Westminster Review, Jan.). 

Macaulay in ' Essay on Machiavelli ', in Edinburgh Review 
(March), ranks the Commedia second only to the Iliad and Odyssey ; 
and applies Purg. xiv. 109-1 1 to Florence. 

Foscolo's ' Discorso sul testo della Commedia ' (in Monthly Review, 
May). 

In Quarterly Review (June), Art. ii, Milton and Dante are compared ; 
and Purg. ii. 10-26, and Inf. ix. 64-103, are translated in Spenserian 
stanzas ; (Oct.) Art. iv, the geologist is likened to Dante on his 
journey through Hell. 

T. Moore, in Edinburgh Review (Oct.), Art. iv, argues that the 
title of ' Comedy ' given by Dante to his poem proves ' how little 
dramatic ideas or associations were afloat in his time '. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 78 

Thomas Carlyle, in ' State of German Literature ', in Edinburgh 
Review (Oct.), speaks of ' the lurid fire of Dante ', in contrast to the 
' auroral light of Tasso '. 

H. F. Gary, in letter to Gabriele Rossetti, says that if his hypo- 
thesis as to the hidden meaning of the Commedia ' shall stand the 
test of strict examination ', it ' must be accounted one of the most 
remarkable discoveries ever made in the history of past ages '. 

Lord Holland, in note to his translation of the Seventh Satire 
of Ariosto (printed in W. S. Rose's translation of Orlando Furioso, 
V. 303 ff.), points out an imitation (in 1. 153) of Purg. xxiv. 108- 
111. 

Notice of Dante (in Museum of Foreign Literature, xi. 43). 

Anon. : translation (verse) of Canz. iv. {V.N., § 32) (' Gli occhi 
dolenti ') (in New London Literary Gazette, p. 190). 

Charles Strong : translation (verse) of Son. xxiv. {V.N., § 41) 
(' Deh, pellegrini ') (in Specimens of Sonnets from the most celebrated 
Italian Poets, with Translations, Lond.). 

Henry Neele, in Lectures on English Poetry, points out the 
resemblance between Sackville's Induction and the Inferno (Lect. ii.). 

Wordsworth, in his Sonnet on the Sonnet, says ' The Sonnet 
glittered a gay myrtle leaf Amid the cypress with which Dante 
crowned His visionary brow ' ; in his Reminiscences, he speaks of 
Ariosto and Tasso being ' very absurdly depressed in order to elevate 
Dante '. 

Augustus William and Julius Charles Hare, in Guesses at 
Truth, couple Shakespeare and Dante as intensifiers of mental vision 
(ed. 1838, Ser. i. 42-3) ; compare Homer and Dante (Ser. i. 56. 88-9) ; 
speak of Dante's judgement as 'spellbound by Virgil' (ed. 1848, 
Ser. ii. 35) : remark that Dante is ignored in Dryden's famous 
epigram on Milton (Ser. ii. 78) ; note that both Sophocles and Dante 
are sparing in the use of ornamental epithet (Ser. ii. 99). 

La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri. Con nuovi Argomenti ; 

Annotazioni da' migliori Comentatori scelte ed abbreviate ; e colV AccerUo 

di Prosodia. Ai Dilettanti e Scolari delV Italiana Favella devotamente 

dedicata da Pietro Cicchetti. (Londra, 12mo.) 

[Printed by Whittinghams at the Chiswick Press ; published by C. S. Arnold. 
This is the first English-printed edition of the Commedia complete in one 
volume, and the sixth edition printed and published in England. Noticed 
in Monthly Magazine (March). Frontisi)iece of ' Krancesca and Paolo ', 
engraved by Kedaway, after Briggs.] 

Henry Perronet Briggs : oil painting of ' Francesea and Paolo ' 
(Inf. V. 100-2), engraved by J. Redaway, as frontispiece to pre- 
ceding. 



74 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 827 — con tinued. 

W. Blake : Illustrations to the Inferno of Dante. 

[Seven plates (with titles from Gary's translation) designed and engraved 
by Blake as part of his commission for Linnell (see under 1824-7).] 

1828 

In Quarterly Reviero (Jan.), Art. iii, Dante's position as a theologian, 
and his attitude to the Church, are discussed ; (Oct.) Art. iii, the 
influence of Dante in Spain, and the devotion to him of the Marquis 
de Santillane, are toiiched on. 

Macaulay, in ' Essay on John Dryden ', in Edinburgh Review 
(Jan.), examines the judgement of Dante by fourteenth-century 
Italians; in ' Essaj' on Hallam's Constitutional History' (Sept.), 
he applies Inf. iii. 37-9, 51, to Cranmer. 

In the Literary Gazette, and Journal of the Belles Lettres (Feb.), 
G. Rossetti's claim to have discovered the true key to the hidden 
sense of the Inferno is admitted. 

A. H. Hallam, in letter to Milnes Gaskell (June 25), translates 
(in blank verse) Purg. xvii. 13-15 (in Records of an Eton Schoolboy, 
ed. C. M. Gaskell, priv. pr., 1883) ; to an ' Italian Sonnet to an 
English Lady ', he prefixes as motto Purg. xxiv. 13-14. 

Ca^lyle, in 'Essay on Burns', in Edinburgh Review (Dec), 
speaks of the relative jjower of imagination in Dante and in his 
readers. 

T. MooBE : Imitation of the Inferno of Dante (burlesque poem, 
to which Inf. v. 42-3 is prefixed as motto). 

W. S. Landoe, in Imaginary Conversations (' Landor, English 
Visiter, Florentine Visiter '), says the Florentines were not created 
for the gloom of Dante, but are alive and alert in the daylight of 
Petrarch and Boccaccio. 

Leigh Hunt, in Lord Byron and some of his Contemporaries, 
comments on the descriptions of the sea by Dante and other great 
poets ; discasses the influence of climate on poets, Dante and 
Petrarch, for example ; and asserts the siqjerior originality of these 
two over the Augustan poets (ii. 336-8, 355, 400-1) ; in The Com- 
panion (No. i. ' An Earth upon Heaven '), he says Dante's ' shining 
lights ' are poor, as an indication of heaven, in comparison with 
St. Paul's words in 1 Cor. ii. 9. 

A. Panxzzi, in The Foreign Review and Continental Miscellany, in 
a review of G. Rossetti's ' Comento Analitico ', mercilessly exposes his 
fallacies — ' at every syllable he discovers some new and extraordinary 
meaning ; he tortures grammar, and history, criticism, and poetry 



IN LITERATURE AND ART T6 

to prop up his system ' — and derides his claim to have been the 
Cokimbus of the unknown world of the Comniedia. 

John Gorton : Dante (in A General Biographical Dictionary, 
Lond.). 

Edward VVilmot : Ugolino, or The Tower of Famine (poem). 
(Lond.) 

1829 

The library of George Hibbert (sold in March-June) contained 
eight editions of the Divina Commedia, including the first Florentine 
(1481), with fifteen of the Botticelli designs (£40 19s.), Venice, 1477 
(£4 19*.), and Venice, 1520 (£11). 

Mrs. Jameson, in The Romunce of Biography, or Memoirs of Wotnen 
loved and celebrated by Poets, gives an account of Dante's love for 
Beatrice, and translates sundry passages from the Vita Nuova, 
including Son. xi, xiii (§§ 21, 22), and Canz. iv. 15-28 (§ 32), in 
prose. 

John Wilson, in a review of the above in Blackwood's Magazine 
(Sept.), imagines Dante ma,ted with a ' Dowdy ', with the probable 
consequence that he would have been hanged for wife-murder ; 
he then, in a serious vein, dwells on the story told in the Vita Nuova, 
of which he says, ' the love, the sorrow, the despair, the prostration, 
and the resuscitation of Dante's spirit, are all most beautiful and 
most sublime.' 

In the Foreign Review and Continental Miscellany, Art. ix, the 
novelty is emphasized of the plan of the Commedia, in which Dante 
is his own prototype and hero. 

C. H. Hartshokne, in The Book Rarities in the University of 
Cambridge, registers two editions of the Commedia, viz. Florence, 
1481, with eighteen engravings (King's), and Bressa, 1487 
(St. John's). 

Gerald Griffin, in ' The Lesson in Virgil at Mr. Lenigan's 
Academy ', in Tales of the Munster Festival (Ser. ii), imagines ' the 
great Augustan poet looking into this Irish academy, from that part 
of the infernal regions in which he had been placed by his pupil 
Dante '. 

T. L. Peacock, in Tlie Misfortunes of Elphin, quotes Inf. iv. 81 as 
motto to chap. 11. 

The British Museum acquires by bequest from the Earl of Bridge- 
water the Egerton MSS., including three of the Commedia, one 
Cent. XIV {Egerton 943), two Cent. XV (Egerton 932, 2085). 

[Sec Colomb de Batines, BiU. Dmif. ii. 277 ; Moore, Text. Crit. of D.C., 
pp. 589-91, 597-8.] 



76 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1829-30 

Thomas Thorpe, in his Sale Catalogue of Manuscripts, offers 

(No. 287). Dante. Commentario sopra la Divina Commedia di 

Dante. 3 vols. £7. 17s. 6d. ; (No. 12614.). Dante. Commentum 

Domini Petri de Andalgerii, sive Aldagerii, super tres Comaedias 

Dantes. £7. 7s. 

c. 1830 

Charles Lyell : translation of Vita Nuova and Convivio (poems 

in unrhymed verse). 

[Not published. See Lyell's preface (p. viii) to the first edition (1835) of 
his Cansoniere of Dante ; and Cary to LyelJ, May 1, 13, 1844.] 

Arthur Hallam, in letter to Tennyson, says, in reference to a 
projected translation of the Vita Nuova, with notes and prefaces, 
' I purpose to discuss considerably about poetry in general, and about 
the ethical character of Dante's poetry.' 

James Smith : Lines on seeing a picture of Ugolino (in Memoirs, <&c., 
of the late James Smith, Lond., 1840). 

T. Moore, in chap. 1 of The Chapter of the Blanket : A Fragment, 
quotes Inf. i. 30 a propos of the uphill work of beginning a narrative. 

1880 

In Foreign Quarterly Review (Feb.), Art. ii, resumes are given of 
the Inferno and the De Vulgari Eloquentia. 

Macaulay, in ' Essay on Robert Montgomery's Poems ', in 
Edinburgh Review (April), a propos of Montgomery's description of 
a dead warrior lying on his breast and staring at the skies, aptly 
quotes Inf. xx. 16-18. 

W. Hazlitt, in ' Footmen ', in New Monthly Magazine (Sept.), 
describes a lady's maid arriving in Florence, ' without suspecting 
that such a person as Boccaccio, Dante, or Galileo had ever lived 
there ' ; in Conversations of James Northcote he reports Northcote as 
saying (Conv. 20) that Dante could not have described Fox and 
Sheridan looking more gloomy than they do in Gilray's 'Revolu- 
tionist's Jolly-boat '. 

T. MooRE, in Life, Letters, and Journals of Lord Byron, compares 
Byron with Dante in respect of his precocious love (ed. 1838, p. 9) ; 
speaks of Dante as ' distinguished in war ', and ' a falconer as well 
as swordsman' (p. 21); quotes Dante's description of Rachel 
(Purg. xxvii. 104-5) a propos of genius (p. 268) ; couples Byron 
with Dante as having been unhappy in marriage (pp. 271, 298) ; 
criticizes Dante for his (alleged) recommendation of scenes from the 
Apocalypse to Giotto as subjects for his brush (p. 412) ; compares 



IX LITERATURE AND ART 7T 

Byron with Dante as regards his wrongs and sufferings, his contempt 
for the world's opinion, wliich led Dante to exclaim ' Lascia dir ie 
genti ' (Purg. v. 13), and his pride (pp. 643-4). 

T. RoscoK, in ' The Tourist in Switzerland and Italy ', in the 
Landscape Annual, among numerous other references to Dante, 
quotes in the description of Bologna Dante's comparison of Antaeus 
to the leaning Garisenda tower (Inf. xxxi. 136-40). 

A. Panizzi, in Essay on the Romantic Narrative Poetry of the 
Italians (prefixed to his edition of Boiardo and Ariosto), discusses 
Dante's knowledge of Greek ; epitomizes Dante's account of the 
fate of the souls of Guido and Buonconte da Montefeltro (Inf. xxvii. 
112 ff. ; Purg. V. 103 ff.) ; and approves the doom of ' trimmers ' in 
Dante's Hell. 

S. Rogers, in Italy : A Poem, introduces sundry reminiscences of 
Dante, with occasional translations, the parallel passages being 
quoted or referred to in the notes, e.g. in ' Bergamo ', Dante and the 
Scaligers {Par. xvii. 70-2) ; in ' Venice ', Ezzelino da Romano 
(/«/. xii. 110); in ' Foscari '. Ugolino {Inf. xxxii) ; in ' Ginevra ', 
Paolo and Francesca {Inf. v. 127-38) ; in ' Bologna ', Dante's tomb ; 
in ' Florence ', the ' Sasso di Dante ', and Baptistery (Inf. xix. 17), 
the damned souls in Tolomea (Inf. xxxiii. 124 ff.), the incident of 
Dante's breaking the font in San Giovanni (Inf. xix. 16-21), and 
translation of the prophecy of his exile (Par. xvii. 35-6, 58-60) ; in 
' The Campagna of Florence ', the Tower of Famine at Pisa (Inf. 
xxxiii. 23, 46-7), Buondelmonte's breach of faith (Par, xvi. 140-1), 
and translation of the description of evening (Purg. viii. 1-6) ; in 
' A Farewell ', La Pia and the Maremma (Purg. v. 134-6 ; Inf. 
xxix. 47). 

John" Bowring, in Poetry of the Magyars, a propos of the literary 
influence of Italy upon Hungarj', quotes (p. xxviii) Par. xix. 142-3. 

Tennyson, in The Poet, refers to Dante (as is supposed) as ' The 
poet . . . Dower'd with the hate of hate, the seom of scorn. The love 
of love '. 

Alfred Howard : Dante (in Biographical Illustration.^, Lond.). 

John Macray, in The Golden Lyre. Specimens of the Poets of 
England, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain, represents Dante by 
Son. xi(r.Ar.,§ 21). 

A. H. Hallam, in ' A Farewell to the South ' (in terza rima). 
devotes 82 lines to Dante and Beatrice (in Poems, pp. 15-19). 

John Abraham Heraud, in preface to his epic poem in terza rima. 
The Descent into Hell, discusses the experiments of his predecessors 
in the use of Dante's metre. 



78 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1831 

John Wilson, in Noctes Ambrosianae, xxvii (Jan.), represents the 
Ettrick Shepherd as saying that he had ' never read a word o' Dante's 
Comedy o' Hell ', and that ' the soobjeck seems better adapted for 
tragedy ' ; xxx (April), North says, ' A description of his Purgatory 
by the Ghost of the Glasgow Gander will eclipse Dante's.' 

A. H. Hallam, in letter to W. H. Brookfield (March 4), from 
Somersby, in allusion to his attachment to Tennyson's sister, says 
' even Dante, even Alfred's poetry, is at a discount ' ; in his Oration 
on the Influence of Italian Works of the Itnagination on the same class 
of Compositions in England, he refers to the account of the meeting 
between Sordello and Virgil in Purg. vi. 71-5 as an example of 
Dante's ' strong sense of community ' ; describes Dante as ' an 
entire and plenary representation of the Italian mind ' ; refers to 
Milton's debt to Dante and his acknowledgement of the debt (in his 
letter to Buonmattei) ; speaks of ' the perpetual freshness and quiet 
beauty ' of Dante, and quotes and translates in verse Par. xxx. 40-2 ; 
in a Sonnet to Emily Tennyson he says, ' Old Dante's voice encircles 
all the air ' ; in his essay ' On Some of the Characteristics of Modern 
Poetry, and on the Lyrical Poems of Alfred Tennyson ', in the 
Englishman's Magazine (Aug.), he explains the ' popularity ' of 
Homer, Shakespeare, and Dante as due to the fact that 'they 
speak to the hearts of all, and by the magnetic force of their con- 
ceptions elevate inferior intellects into a higher and purer atmo- 
sphere ' ; in his criticism of Oriana, he speaks of ' the meditative 
tenderness of Dante '. 

Carlyle, in ' Historic Survey of German Poetry ', in Edinburgh 
Review (Mar.), observes that the Germans are without a Dante ; in 
' Early German Literature ', in Foreign Quarterly Review (Oct.), he 
speaks of ' the mystic song of Dante, with its stern indignant moral ', 
as ' a splendid exception ' in the fourteenth century. 

Frances A. Kemble, in her Journal (April 23), claims on the 
authority of Dante's canzone, ' Donne, ch' avete intelletto d'amore ' 
(V.N., § 19), that ladies have ' the intellect of love'; (May 29) she 
translates, and applies to the weather. Inf. vi. 7-8. 

Macaulay, in 'Essay on Moore's Life of Byron', in Edinburgh 
Review (June), qualifies Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, and Milton as 
' the most correct of poets ' ; and remarks that the descriptive 
powers even of Homer and Dante are inferior to the imitations of 
the painter and sculptor^ 

H. F. Gary : The Vision ; or Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, of 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 79 

Dante Alighieri. The third edition. With the life of Dante, notes, 
and an index. (Lend., 3 vols., 12mo.) 

Susan E. Ferrier, in Destiny, quotes in vol. ii, ch. 2, Gary's 
version of Dante's description of evening (Purg. viii. 1-6), and in 
vol. iii, ch. 80, quotes as motto Gary's version of Par. xiii. 133-5. 

A. Panizzi, in ' The Tourist in Italy ', in the Landscape Annual, 
k propos of Rimini, discusses the episode of Paolo and Francesca 
{Inf. v), and suggests that Dante's line, ' Soli eravam e senza alcun 
sospetto ', may be a reminiscence of a phrase in the Tristan romance, 
' ils sont tons deux seul a seul, qu'ilz n'ont nul destourbier, ne paour 
ni d'ung ni d'autre.' 

Henry Stebbing: Life of Dante, in Lives of the Italian Poets, with 
verse translations of Son. i, xx, xxi from the Vita Nuova. 

Anon. : engraving of head of Dante in medallion, as illustration 
to the above. 

1831-42 

Kenelm H. Digby, in Mores Catholici : or Ages of Faith, quotes 
two or three hundred times from the Commedia, in Gary's translation, 
to whom he acknowledges his great debt as the interpreter of 'the 
great poet of the ages of faith ' ; he also translates one or two passages 
from the Vita Nuova and Convivio. 

c. 1832 
Edward Fitzgerald, in ' Reminiscences of Tennyson ' (as 
recorded in ilfenmr of Lord Tennyson, i. 120-11), relates that 'once 
looking with A. T. at two busts of Dante and Goethe in a shop 
window in Regent Street, I said, "What is there wanting in Goethe 
which the other has ? "— " The Divine ! " '. 

1832 

Edward Gheney, in ' Memoranda of Sir Walter Scott's Visit to 
Rome ' (May) (in Lockhart's Life of Scott, ed. 1833, vii. 370-1), 
records a conversation with Scott about Dante, of whom he said ' he 
knew little, confessing he found him too obscure and difficult ' ; on 
Scott remarking that it was ' mortifying that Dante seemed to think 
nobody worth being sent to hell but his own Italians ', Cheney 
reminded him of the place assigned to ' his own ancestor ', Michael 
Scott, quoting the passages {Inf. xx. 115-17). 

In Edinburgh Review (July), Art. x, G. Rossetti's ' Comento anali- 
tico' is reviewed and the extravagance of his theory exposed. 

Frances A. Kemble, in her Journal (Aug. 16), on the voyage to 
America, quotes Purg. i. 13, ' that loveliest line in Dante ', a propos 



80 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1832 — continued. 
of the colour of the sea ; (Aug. 22) she recalls Dante's lines on fame 
{Purg. xi. 91-108) a propos of Sir Walter Scott. 

Leigh Hunt, in the new edition of his Story of Rimini, in the 
' Argument ', says the poem ' is founded on the beautiful episode of 
Paulo and Francesca in the fifth book of the Inferno, where it stands 
like a lily in the mouth of Tartarus '. 

T. RoscoE, in ' The Tourist in Italy ', in the Landscape Annual, 
discusses Dante's references to the Visconti in the Conimedia ; and 
remarks on the neglect of Dante by the Florentines, and on the 
absence of any monument to him in Florence. 

TENNY.SON, in The Palace of Art, introduces ' grim Dante ', and 
' Verulam, the King of those who know ' (a reminiscence of Inf. iv. 131 ) 
(see under 1842). 

In Notizie intorno all' Origine e alia Storia delta Lingua e delta 
Letteratura Italiana (pub. in London by Rolandi), an account of 
Dante and of his principal works is given (pp. 43-7), with an extract 
from the episode of Paolo and Francesca {Inf. v. 97-142). 

Charles Macfarlane, in The Romance of History : Italy, makes 
frequent reference to Dante, and prefixes to many of the tales 
mottoes from the Commedia ; among the episodes he includes 
Dante's exile, with translation of Conv. i. 3, 11. 20-43 ; iv. 27, II. 96- 
100, in 'The Wandering King'; Buondelmonte {Par. xvi. 140-1), 
in 'The Fatal Nuptials'; and Manfred {Purg. iii. 112), in 'The 
Doomed King '. 

G. RossETTi : Sullo Spirito Antipapale che produsse la Riforma, e 

sulla segreta influenza ch' esercito nella Letteratura d' Europa, 

e specialmente d' Italia, come risulta da molti suoi Classici, massime 

da Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio. (Londra.) 

[Published for the author by Rolandi and others ; dedicated to Charles 
Lyell. An English translation by Caroline Ward was published in 1834. 
' In this work ', writes W. M. Rossetti, in G. Rossetti : A Versified Auto- 
biography (p. 67), ' the author develops and extends the ideas, which he 
had conceived during his study of Dante, as to a secret society to which 
that poet and many other writers belonged, and as to the essentially 
anti-christian as well as anti-papal opinions covertly expressed in their 
writings.'] 

A. H. HALiiAM : Remarks on Professor Rossetti's ' Disquisizioni 
sullo Spirito Antipapale ' ; in which is included translation in verse 
o{Son. vi, {V.N., § 13) ('Tutti li miei pensier') (in fiemmn*, ed. 1863, 
pp. 240 ff,). 

Madame D'Arblay (Fanny Burney), in Memoirs of Dr. Burney, 
records (i. 150-1) that after the death of his first wife (Sept. 1761) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 81 

Dr. Burney ' had recourse to the works of Dante . . . that hardest, but 
most sublime of Italian poets ', the result being ' a sedulous, yet 
energetic, though prose translation of the Inferno ', which was in 
existence when she wrote, but has not been preserved. 

Frances Trollope, in Domestic Manners of the Americans, 
compares the mouth of the Mississippi to a ' Bolgia ' of Dante (i. 1-2) ; 
and applies to the Americans (i. 62) an adaptation of Inf. iii. 51. 

Charles Bucke, in On the Life, Writings, and Genius of Akenside, 
quotes Inf. xxxiv. 61-7, and remarks (pp. 273-4) on the severity of 
Dante's judgement of Brutus and Cassius. 

Thomas Hood, among ' Titles for the Library Door at Chatsworth ', 
suggests ' Dante's Inferno : or Description of Van Demon's Land '. 

Leitch Ritchie, in Travelling Sketches in the North of Italy, in 
the ' Story of Lelia ', represents his heroine as having recourse to 
' sortes Danteanae ' — ' Sortes were wrested from the pages of 
Dante '. 

Benjamin D'Israeli, in The Revolutionary Epick, styles the Iliad 
' an Heroic Epick ', the Aeneid ' a Political Epick ', and the Divine 
Comedy ' a National Epick '. 

John Rogers Herbert : oil painting of ' Francesca ' (Soc. Brit. 
Artists, No. 266). 

1833 

Ichabod Charles Wright : The Inferno of Dante, Translated. 

(Lond.) 

[In bastard terza rima, with introduction and notes : dedicated to Lord 
Brougham as ' one of the most ardent admirers of Dante '. A second 
edition, with portions of the translation recast, and additional notes, was 
issued in the same year. Reviewed in Gentleman^s Magazine, Jan. ; 
Athenaeum, March ; Monthly Review, March ; Quarterly Review, July ; 
Edinburgh Review, July.] 

Henry Alford, in his Journal (Feb. 2), records that he was pro- 
jecting an allegorical poem in ' a mode of that of our sweet Spenser, 
and the great and holy Dante '. 

Lamb, in letters to Louisa Badams (Feb. 15), and H. F. Cary 
(Sept. 9), says that he and Mary Lamb, and Emma Isola, are reading 
the Inferno, with ' the blessed furtherance ' of Cary's ' polar-star 
translation '. 

Tennyson, in letter to Mrs. Russell (March 10), quotes Inf. i. 3 
a propos of her unknown address. 

In Quarterly Review (April), Art. viii. Par. xvii. 58-60 is quoted and 
applied to the exiles of the French Revolution ; (July) Art. iii. 
Cam. vi. 53-5 {Conv. ii) is quoted and applied to Pindar's odes. 

H. F. Cary, in Journal of a Tour on the Continent (April-May), 

G 



82 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 883 — continued. 
mentions the MSS. of the Divina Cmnmedia he inspected in various 
libraries at Rome, Bologna, and Parma. 

Wordsworth, in a sonnet on Greenock, in Poems composed during 
a Tour in the Summer of 1833, introduces an adaptation of Inf. iii. 1, 
which is prefixed as motto. 

Notice of Dante (in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, Nov. 2). 

T. Medwin, in The Shelley Papers, records, a propos of Shelley's 
diffidence in his own powers, that ' he used to say that reading Dante 
produced in him despair ' ; and quotes his attribution of ' the union, 
and energy, and beauty, which distinguish from all other poets the 
writings of Dante ' to the spirit of liberty. 

Lady Charlotte Bury, in The Three Great Sanctuaries of Tuscany, 
introduces several references to Dante, and quotes as mottoes 
sundry passages from the Commedia. 

A. T. Malkin : account of Dante and his works, in The Gallery of 
Portraits : with Memoirs. 

James Hopwood : engraving of group of Dante, Petrarch, Ariosto, 
and Tasso, after Gaitte, as frontispiece to / Quattro Poeti Italiani. 
<Paris.) 

c. 1834 

Tennyson : Ulysses (suggested by Inf. xxvi. 90-142) (Tennyson 
said, ' There 's an echo of Dante m it '). 
[Not published till 1842.] 

1884 

In Quarterly Review (March), Art. ii, Dante and Pindar are described 
as ' the two most picturesque of the great poets of the world ', and 
Purg. vi. 64-6 is quoted as an example from the former; (June) 
Art. ii, reference is made to ' the scriptural expressions and imagery ' 
■of Dante, and to his sympathy with Pier delle Vigne, his account of 
whom (Inf. xiii. 58-78) is quoted. 

Lamb, in letter to T. Manning (May 10), describes how he and 
Mary Lamb had read the Inferno and were reading the Purgatorio ; 
in letter to H. F. Gary (Oct.) he refers to Dante as ' that dark Italian 
Hierophant ', and couples the Commedia and the Apocalypse as 

* divine riddles both '. 

Macaulay, in letter to T. F. Ellis (July 1) from Ootacamund, says 

* I still think of Dante, as I thought when I first read him, that he is 
a superior poet to Milton, that he runs neck and neck with Homer, 
and that none but Shakespeare has gone decidedly beyond him ' ; 
in letter to Margaret Macaulay (Sept.) from Calcutta, he says that 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 88 

the Commedia and Don Quixote were the only two foreign works 
which did not disappoint him at a first reading. 

Isaac D'Israeli, in vol. vi of Curiosities of Literature, in ' Senti- 
mental Biography ', discourses on the lives of Dante by Boccaccio 
and Leonardo Aretino, the former of which he styles ' the sentimental 
life '. 

T. Moore, in A Character, introduces a simile from Dante — ' Like 
those odd shapes, portray'd in Dante's lay. With heads fix'd on, the 
^vrong and backward way ' — and quotes the original {InJ. xx. 13-15) 
in a note. 

Sir S. E. Brydges, in his Autobiography, Times, Opinions, and 
Contemporaries, among other references to Dante, remarks on the 
active lives led by him and other poets (i. 36), though their great 
works were written in retirement (i. 234, 345) ; and classes Dante 
with Petrarch, Shakespeare, Spenser, Milton, and Byron, as having 
attained ' the ideal excellence of poetry ' (i. 394). 

T. Medwin, in the Angler in Wales, records opinions of Byron 
and Shelley with regard to Dante, and prints (ii. 218-20) a com- 
posite translation in terza rima by Shelley and himself of Purg. 
xxviii. 1-51. 

T. Hood, in Tylney Hall, introduces reminiscence of Dante's 
description of the Gate of Hell (Inf. iii. 9) — ' that tremendous portal, 
in Dante, beyond which hope has not even a name ' (chap. 31). 

Caroline Ward : Disquisitions on the Antipapal Spirit which 
produced the Reformation. (From the Italian of G. Rossetti. 
Lond., 2 vols.) 

[This translation contains a considerable amount of matter, supplied by 
Rossetti, which does not appear in the original. Numerous renderings 
from Dante's works are included, among them some of the earliest English 
translations of many passages from tlie prose works and Canzoniere.} 

JosiAH CoNDER, in Italy, quotes sundry geographical references in 
the Commedia, e. g. to Pietola {Purg. xviii. 82-8) ; the Slavini di 
Marco (Inf. xii. 4-5); and the Carisenda tower at Bologna (Inf. 
xxxi. 136-40). 

Lady Blessington, in The Idler in Italy, makes numerous refer- 
ences to Dante, including a lengthy sketqh of his life and political 

career (iii. 56-65). 

1834^6 

In Bibliotheca Heberiana, the sale catalogue of the library of Richard 
Heber, are registered upwards of seventy copies of the works of Dante, 
including six MSS. of the Commedia, besides copies (in many cases 
several copies) of the Foligno (1472), Mantua (1472), Naples (1477), 
Venice (1477), Florence (1481), Venice (1484), Aldine (1502, 1515), 

G2 



84 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1834-6 — continued. 
Junta (1506), and Paganino (n. d.) printed editions ; copies of the 
Spanish translation of Villegas (1515), and the French of Grangier 
(1597) ; and the first editions of the Convivio (1490), and De Vulgari 
Eloquentia (1529, 1577). Three items of special interest are Milton's 
copy, with his autograph, dated 1629, of the third edition (1529) of 
the Convivio (part iv, No. 1527) ; Drummond of Hawthornden's copy, 
with his autograph, of the 1555 Giolito edition of the Commedia 
(part viii. No. 619); and a MS. of the Commedia which had belonged 
to Charles James Fox (part xi. No. 651). 

1834-7 
SouTHEY, in The Doctor, quotes as mottoes sundry passages from 
the Commedia, viz. Par. xxix. 10-12 to chap. 113 ; Purg. ix. 70-2 to 
chap. 121 ; Inf. ix. 61-3 to interchap. 24 ; and Par. x. 22-7 to 

Epilude of Mottoes. 

1835 
John Wilson, in Nodes Ambrosianae, xxxviii (Jan.), represents 
the Ettrick Shepherd as remarking to North, ' I never understood 
Dante till I heard you read up the greatest part o' Hell ae nicht in 
your ain study. Yon's fearsome. The terzza rima's an infernal 
measure ... I could hae thocht that you was Dante himsel — the 
great Florentine.' 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letter to John Allen (May 23), says he is 
reading Dante by the aid of a Dictionary ; in letter to Tennyson 
(July 2), he tells him he has brought a small Dante for him, and 
another for himself. 

Charles Lyell : The Canzoniere of Dante Alighieri, including the 
Poems of the Vita Nuova and Convito ; Italian and English. (Lond.) 
[In unrhymed verse, in tlie metres of the original. In the Canzoniere, of 
■which this is the first English translation, Lyell included 77 poems, many 
of which are not now accepted as by Dante. New editions in 1840, 1842, 
1845.] 
James Moxtgomery : Life of Dante. (Lond.) 

[Contains estimate of the Commedia, and numerous translations in blank 
verse.] 

Francis Sylvester Maiiony (' P'ather Prout ') : translation 
(verse) of Inf. iii. 1-3, 7-51, in ' The Songs of Italy ' in Eraser's 
Magazine (reprinted in Father ProuVs Reliques, ed. 1862, pp. 337-8). 

William Ewart Gladstone : translation (in terza rima) of 
Purg. xi. 1-21 ('The Lord's Prayer'), and Par. iii. 70-87 (' Speech of 
Piccarda ') (printed in Translations by Lord Lyttelton and Rt. Hon. 
W. E. Gladstone, 1861, pp. 117-19).' 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 85 

Mrs. Shelley, in Lodore, says of the hero (in chap. 47), ' the words 
of Francesca da Rimini rushed upon his mind. . . . He recollected 
how she and her lover were consoled by their eternal companionship 
in the midst of the infernal whirlwind ' (Inf. v. 105, 135). 

M. F. Catherine Doetti:!! Corbaux : oil painting ' from Canto V 
of the Inferno ' {Inf. v. 121-3) (Soc. Brit. Artists, No. 86). 

1836 

The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Heber sale a 
Cent. XV MS. of the Divina Comniedia (MS. 10317). 

W. S. Landor : The Pentameron ; or Interviews of M. Giovanni 
Boccaccio and M. Francesco Petrarca . . . showing how they dis- 
coursed upon that famous Theologian M. Dante Alighieri, and sundry 
other matters. (Lond.) 

[A prolonged dialogue between Petrarch and Boccaccio as to the merits 
and demerits of Dante, in the course of whicli Petrarch is credited with 
some exceedingly severe, and at times abusive, criticisms of the Commedia, 
tempered, however, by occasional expressions of admiration. Sundry 
passages are translated in prose.] 

I. C. Wright : The Purgatorio of Dante, Translated. (Lond.) 

James Montgomery : Translations from Dante (in blank verse, 
in Poetical Works), viz. Inf. xxxii. 124-xxxiii. 75 (' Ugolino and 
Ruggieri ') ; Inf. xxx. 49-148 (' Maestro Adamo ') ; Par. viii. 13-15, 
ii. 19-36 ; v. 91-3 ; ix. 64-72 (' Dante and Beatrice ') ; Par. xxx. 46- 
120 (' The River of Life ') ; Inf^ iii. 1-80 (' The Portal of Hell ') ; 
Inf. xxxi. 112-45 (' Antaeus ') ; Purg. xiv. 127-42 (' Cain ') ; Inf. x. 
22-114 (' Farinata '). 

W. E. Gladstone, in his Diary (Nov. 11), records that he ' recom- 
menced with great anticipations of delight the Divina Commedia '. 

A short sketch of Dante (in The Ladies' Cabinet of Fashion, Music, 
and Romance, July-Dec). 

In The Inquisitor. Letters addressed to Trelawney Tomkinson, Esq., 
the author of which has not been identified, is a dissertation ' On the 
Stile and Characteristics of Dante ' (Lett, iii), and a discussion of the 
Commedia, together with an analysis of the Inferno (as far as the 
end of canto vii), which is interspersed with translations (including 
the whole of canto v) ' in stanzas of three blank lines '. 

Edward Shannon : The Comedy of Dante Alighieri : Translated 

by Odoardo Volpi (Dublin) ; Sonnet on Dante (in Arnaldo ; Gaddo ; 

and other unacknowledged Poems; . . . collected by Odoardo Volpi, 

p. 240). 

[Shannon adopted the pseudonyms of ' Odoardo Volpi ' and ' Edward Fox ' 
for the purposes of mystification. His translation {lerza rima) of the 
Commedia contains only Inf. i-x.] 



86 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 836 — co7itinued. 

J. Walsh : oil painting of ' Subject from the Inferno ' (R.A., 
No. 765). 

Thomas F. Boddington : oil painting of ' The Last Hour ' 
{Purg. viii. 6) (Soc. Brit. Artists, No. 418). 

1837 

Carlyle, in ' Essay on Mirabeau ', in London and Westminster 
Review (Jan.), applies to ' trimmers ' Dante's description of the 
neutral angels (Inf. iii. 88 ff.), and his contemptuous dismissal of 
them {Inf. iii. 51). 

E. B. Barrett, in letter to Mrs. Martin (Jan. 23), describes her 
first meeting with Wordsworth, who ' sate near me and talked to 
me as long as he was in the room — and recited a translation by Gary 
of a sonnet of Dante's '. 

Macaulay, in ' Essay on Lord Bacon ', in Edinburgh Review (July), 
remarks that ' Dante never stays too long ' ; and quotes Inf. iv. 
43-5 k propos of certain Greek philosophers who were ' teachers of 
unfruitful wisdom '. 

Giuseppe Mazzini, in ' On Italian Literature since 1830 ', in 
Westminster Review (Oct.), criticizes Manzoni's comparison of Monti 
to Dante ; and pays tribute to Foscolo as ' the first who undertook 
the study and the culture of Dante as of a profound patriot '. 

Wordsworth : sonnet on ' il sasso di Dante ' (' The laurell'd 
Dante's favourite seat ') in ' At Florence ', in Memorials of a Tour 
in Italy. 

Keble, in Latin lecture as Professor of Poetry at Oxford, mentions 
Dante among the poets who wrote sonnets — ' dedit operam istiusmodi 
carminibus, quo nemo severius scripsit, nemo religiosius, Dantes 
Aligherus ' (Praelect. xxiv). 

W. E. Gladstone : translation (in terza rima) of Inf. xxxiii. 1-78 
(' Ugolino ') (printed in Translations by Lord Lyttelton and Rt. Hon. 
W. E. Gladstone, 1861, pp. 109-15). 

Sir Francis Palgrave, in The Merchant and the Friar, quotes 
Inf. ix. 61-3 as motto on the title-page, and uses Dante's phrase, 
volgare illusire, of the speech of Florence. 

In Bibliotheca Phillippica, the catalogue of the MSS. in the library 
of Sir Thomas Phillipps, arc registered four MSS. of the Commedia, 
one of which had previously belonged to Charles James Fox ; a MS. 
of Boccaccio's Vita di Dante ; and a MS. of an unpublished Latin 
commentary on the Commedia by Alberico da Rosciate. 

William Whewell, in his History of the Inductive Sciences, quotes 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 87 

(i. 261-2) Dante's account of his exit from Hell {Inf. xxxiv, 88-90, 
103-4, 110-11), which he declares to be more philosophical than 
Milton's account of Uriel's sliding to earth and back on a sun-beam 
{P.L. iv. 555-6, 589-92). 

Thomas Wade, in The Contention of Love and Death, makes 
Death boast of his claim on Homer and Dante, and other poets, in 
spite of their gift of song (11. 200 ff.). 

J. H. HippisLEY, in Chapters on Early English Literature, remarks 
on the historical value of the Commedia (p. ix), suggests that Dante 
took the idea of a vision from the Roman de la Rose (pp. 20-1), and 
pays a tribute to the picturesqueness of Dante. 

T. F. BoDDiNGTON : oil painting of ' Terrace Scene in the South ' 
{Purg. viii. 1-3). (R.A., No. 321.) 

MusGRAVE L. Watson : marble group of ' Dante and Beatrice ' 
{Par. iii. 50-1). (R.A., No. 1196.) 

Theodor von Holst : oil painting of ' Charon ' {Inf. iii. 84-7, 
100-2). (R.A., No. 302.) 

Charles West Cope : oil painting of ' Paulo and Francisca ' {Inf. 
V. 127 ff.). (R.A., No. 39.) 

William Dyce : oil painting of ' Francesca da Rimini '. (R.S.A., 
No. 49.) 

1887-9 

Henry Hallam, in Introduction to the Literature of Europe, among 
many other references to Dante, describes Dante and Petrarch as 
' the morning stars of our modern literature ' (ed. 1864, i. 43-4), and 
says they ' shone out by a paramount force of genius ' (i. 104) ; asserts 
that Spenser is surpassed by Dante alone among foreign poets 
(ii. 240-1) ; compares Milton and Dante (iv. 236 ff.) 

c. 1838 
Sydney Smith, as recorded in the Memoir by Lady Holland 
(i. 268), jestingly remarked on the inadequacy of Dante's tortures in 
the Inferno—' he may be a great poet, but as to inventing torture, 

I consider him a mere bungler '. 

« 

1838 
Carlyle, in ' Essay on Sir Walter Scott ', in London and West' 
minster Review (Jan.), in illustration of his dictum that ' in the way 
of writing, no great thing was ever done with ease ', refers to Dante's 
' seeing himself " growing lean " over his Divine Comedy ' {Par. 
XXV. 3) ; in his Lectures on the History of Literature (deUvered in 
London in April, May, June), Lect. V is devoted to Dante and the 
Divina Commedia. 



88 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 838 — continued. 

James Montgomery, in conversation (March 8), as recorded in 
Memoirs of his life, remarks that ' light, music, society, and especially 
rest . . . will be found to constitute nearly the entire subject of the 
Paradiso of Dante '. 

Macaulay, in ' Essay on Sir William Temple ', in Edinburgh 
Review (Oct.), imagines Temple judged by ' Dante's infernal tribunal ' 
and condemned to a place beside him who made ' il gran rifiuto ' 
{Inf. iii. 60) ; in his Journal in Italy, at Florence (Nov. 8), he records 
his emotions on seeing the monument to Dante in Santa Croce, and 
remarks, ' I believe that very few people have ever had their minds 
more thoroughly penetrated with the spirit of any great work than 
mine is with that of the Divine Comedy,' adding that he was proud 
to think that he had a right to apostrophise Dante in his own words 
to Virgil (Inf. i. 82-4). 

J. H. Merivale, in Poems Original and Translated, in his preface 
(xi-xiii) criticizes recent translations of the Commedia ; and prints 
the following renderings (in terza rima) of his own : Inf. iii. 1-136 
(' The Entrance of Hell ') ; Inf. v. 25-141 (' Paul and Francesca ') ; 
Inf. vi. 34-100 (' Ciacco, the Glutton ') ; Inf. viii. 31-64 (' PhiUppo 
Argenti ') ; Inf. x. 1-136 (' Dante and Farinata ') ; Inf. xiii. 1-108 
(' Peter de Vineis ') ; Inf. xiii. 109-51 (' Lano and Sant' Andrea ') ; 
Purg. ii. 67-133 (' Dante and Casella ') ; Purg. iii. 103-45 ('Manfred ') ; 
Purg. vi. 59-151 (' Sordello ') ; Purg. viii. 1-18, 109-39 (' Conrad 
Malaspina ') ; Purg. xi. 91-142 (' Provenzano Salvani ') ; Par. xv. 
97-148 (' The Praises of Ancient Florence ') ; Par. xvii. 13-142 
(' Dante and Cacciaguida '). 

Tennyson, in letter to Emily Sellwood (his future wife), remarks 
that Dante is full of humour. 

H. Malden : Dante (in Distinguished Men of Modern Times. 
Lond.) 

Richard Monckton Milnes : Dante's Vision ; from the Vita 
Nuova (§ 23, 11. 16-83) (in Poems of Many Years. Lond.) 

Edwin Guest, in A History of English Rhythms, refers to Dante's 
eulogy of Arnaut Daniel {Purg. xxvi. 142 ; V.E. ii. 2, 6, 10, 13), the 
inventor of the ' sestine-stave ' (ii. 372-3). 

George Bowyer, in A Dissertation on the Statutes of the Cities of 
Italy, quotes Purg. vi. 124-6 as evidence that many of the cities of 
Italy were under a single ruler in Dante's day (p. 23) ; and cites 
Dante's reference (/w^.*iv. 144) to Averroes' commentary on Aristotle 
(p. 82). 

Richard Westmacott : alto-relievo in marble of ' Paolo and 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 89 

Francesca ' {Inf. v. 74-5, 34^5). (R.A., No. 1276 ; in possession of 
Marquis of Lansdowne at Bowood.) 

Alfred D. Lemon : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca ' {Inf. 
V. 138). (Brit. Inst., No. 368.) 

1839 

The Ottimo Comento on the Divina Commedia (in Monthly Review, 
Feb.). 

Leigh Hunt, in ' Social Morality : Suckling and Ben Jonson ', 
in Monthly Chronicle (Feb.), compares Ben Jonson's muse with that 
of Dante, which, he says, is ' more grandly disagreeable '. 

Marquis Wellesley, in letter to Samuel Rogers (April 20), 
discusses ' the famous passage in Dante ', Inf. v. 121-3, and quotes 
parallels from Milton and Goldsmith. 

W. E. Gladstone, in his Diary (June 8), records that he gave his 
future wife (Catherine Glymie) Par. xxvi. 64-6, and iii. 85-6, ' for 
canons of our living.' 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letter to VV. F. Pollock (July 20), suggests 
that Alfieri ' would have been a capital Middle Age Italian : especially 
for Dante to put into Hell. But perhaps he'll meet him there yet.' 

In Quarterly Review (Oct.), Art. vi, Merivale's translations from 
Dante are reviewed , and Westmacott's relief of ' Paolo and Francesca ' 
is described as ' one of the most graceful and the most pathetic of relievos '. 

Earl Stanhope, in Notes of Conversations with the Duke of 
Welli7igton, records (Oct. 4) that Lady Burghersh told him that 
Lord Wellesley recently had repeated to her above fifty lines of the 
Ugolino episode, and had said that he thought he could repeat the 
whole canto {Inf. xxxiii). 

Carlyle, in Chartism, likens the wretchedness of the working 
man's world to a ' Dantean Hell ' (ch. 4) ; and speaks of the 
Commedia as ' the mournfulest of books : transcendent mistemper 
of the noblest soul ; utterance of a boundless, godlike, unspeakable, 
implacable sorrow and protest against the world ' (ch. 10). 

Charles H. Timpeeley : biographical notice of Dante (in 
A Dictionary of Printers and Printing, Lond.). 

In Fiori Poetici sceUi ed illustrati da Carlo Beolchi (Londra), pp. 1-68 
are devoted to Dante, viz. ' Vita di Dante ' (1-29), and ' Poesie di 
Dante ' (29-63), the latter being represented 'oy three sonnets, three 
canzoni, and eight passages from the Commedia. 

La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri. (Edimburgo, 24mo.) 

[Edited by G. Ranipini, published by A. & C. Black, forming part of a 
' Biblioteca Classica Italiana '. The seventh edition of the Commedia 
printed and published in Great Britain.] 



90 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

c. 1840 

J. A. Heraud : Deir Inferno of Dante Alighieri, Translated into 

English Terza Rima. (MS.) 

[Unpublished ; MS. in British Museum. An extract (In}, xxvi. 112-42) 
is printed in Dante in English Literature (ii. 540-1).] 

P. Hawke : The Divine Comedy of Dante translated in English. 

(MS.) 

[In prose, Inf. i-xvii only ;' unpublished. Each canto is accompanied by 
copies (in pencil) of the designs of Flaxman. MS. in the Bibliothfeque 
d' Angers (see L. Auvray, Manuscrits de Dante dans les Bibliothiques de 
France, p. 139). . Hawke was professor of drawing at Angers, c. 1830-48.] 

1840 

In Blackwood's Magazine (July), in a discussion of the Italian 
legends as to the Man in the Moon, Dante's references to the legend 
of Cain {Inf. xx. 126 ; Par. ii. 49-51) are quoted. 

W. S. Landor : The Discovery of the Giotto portrait of Dante in 
the Bargello at Florence (in Examiner, Aug. 16) ; in letter to John 
Forster, he quotes (seven lines) ' what one of my characters says on 
reading Dante's story of Francesca da Rimini ' (the reference being 
to his Fra Rupert, published in 1841). 

Sir F. Palgrave, in ' The Fine Arts in Florence ', in Quarterly 
Review (Sept.), remarks on the scanty demand for Dante in England ; 
quotes Dante's comparison of Florence to a sick person (Purg. vi. 
127-51), and his description of Florence in the olden time {Par. xv. 
98-129) ; and k propos of the monument to Dante in Santa Croce, 
says that ' Italian art is as empty as the cenotaph '. 

Seymour Stockeb Kirkup, in letter from Florence to G. Rossetti 
(Sept. 12), describes the discovery of the Giotto portrait of Dante. 

Macaulay, in ' Essay on Ranke's History of the Popes ', in 
Edinburgh Review (Oct.), translates Dante's reference {Purg. xx. 87-9) 
to the outrage on Boniface VIII at Anagni. . 

Carlyle : The Hero as Poet — Dante (in Lectures on Heroes,, 
Lond.) ; in ' The Hero as Priest ' he contrasts Luther and Dante ; 
and in letter to Emerson (Dec. 9) he maintains that the sorrows of 
Goethe were as deep as those of Dante. 

Isaac D'Israeli, in Amenities of Literature, compares the Hell 
of Caedmon, Dante, and Milton (ed. 1867, pp. 42-8) ; quotes Dante's 
definition of the ideal ' volgare illustre ' in the De Vulgari Eloqu^ntia, 
and describes him as ' the classic of his country ' (pp. 101 ff.) ; 
and discusses the meaning of ' the three allegorical animals which 
open the Vision ' (pp. 491-2) ; and the reasons why Dante called his 
poem a Comedy (pp. 502-3). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 91 

I. C. Wright : The Paradise of Dante, Translated. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Dublin University Magazine, Nov.] 
Keble, in Latin lecture as Professor of Poetry at Oxford, draws 
a parallel between Dante, ' Florentinum Ilium, triplici carmine 
nobilem,' and Lucretius ; and says that Dante in his Paradiso was 
' tribus illis ferme contentus : Luce, Motu, Cantu '. (Praelect. xxxiii.) 
James Blundell, in Principles and Practice of Obstetric Medicine, 
quotes (in prose rendering) Inf. vii. 13-14, 22-4 (pp. 151, 196). 

Philip Duncan Buky, in ' Choice of Subjects in Painting ', in 
Essays and Miscellanea, eulogizes Koch's illustrations of the Commedia 
(pp. 7-8), and remarks that Dante's poem is a ' mine ' for artists 
(p. 32). 

John Edward Taylor, in Michael Angela considered as a Philo- 
sophic Poet, in an appreciation of Dante and his works (ed. 1852, 
pp. 58 ff.), quotes numerous passages (in the original) from the 
Vita Nuova and Convivio, as well as from the Commedia and Can- 
zoniere, and translates (in unrhymed verse) Ball, ix (' Poiche saziar 
non posso '), and Michael Angelo's two sonnets on Dante. 

Theodosia Garrow : On the Discovery of Dante's Portrait on 
the Wall of the ancient Chapel of the Bargello at Florence (poem). 
[See BuUettino delta Societa Dantesca Italiana, N.S. xvii. 46.] 
Sir John Hanmer : Bertrand de Born {Inf. xxviii) ; Romeo 
{Par. vi) ; Folco Portinari {V.N., § 22) (iii Sonnets, Lond.). 

Anon. : translation {terza rinia) of Inf. xxvii. 58-129 (in The 
Buried Bride, &c., Southampton). 

Robert Browning, in Sordello, which owes its genesis to Purg. vi. 
58 ff., among other references, apostrophizes ' Dante, pacer of the 
shore Where glutted hell disgorgeth filthiest gloom, Unbitten by its 
whirring sulphur-spume ' (Bk. i). 

W. Pulling : To the Four Great Poets of Italy, Dante, Petrarca, 
Ariosto, and Tasso (in Sonnets written strictly iii the Italian Style, 
Lond.). 

Seymour Kirkup : pencil drawings of ' Plan of localities in 
Florence connected with the life of Dante ', and ' Two ancient 
Tuscan doorways in the house of Dante in Florence as they existed 
in 1840 ' (engraved by G. Cumming as illustrations Co C. Lyell's 
Translation of the Poems of the Vita Nuova and Convito of Dante, 1842 ; 
re-engraved as Plates IV and V in vol. iii of the Vernon Dante, 1865); 
water-colour drawing of ' The portrait of Dante by Giotto in the 
Chapel of the Podesta in the Bargello at Florence ' (made on the 
inside of the vellum cover of a copy of the 1531 edition of the Convivio 
— see Toynbee, Life of Dante, ed. 1910, p. 134). 



92 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1840-1 

Catharine Taylor, in Letters from Italy to a Younger Sister, 
introduces numerous references to Dante, with quotations from the 
Commedia. 

* c. 1841 

A. ViEussEux : Dante and Petrarch (in Knight's Store of Know- 
ledge, Lond.). 

1841 

In Dublin University Magazine (April), in ' Poets and Poetesses ', 
EngHsh translations of Dante are discussed, and Par. xv. 97-148 
is quoted, together Avith the versions of Cary, Wright, and Merivale. 

Leigh Hunt, in letter to Macvey Napier (Jime 25), remarks on 
the tendency to underrate Petrarch in comparison with Dante. 

Seymour Kirkup : chalk drawing, of the size of the original, of 
the face of the Giotto portrait of Dante ; and water-colour sketch 
of the figure of Dante, and of the heads of Corso Donati and Brunetto 
Latini ; sent in letter to G. Rossetti from Florence (Sept. 14), in 
which he describes the condition of the original after it had been 
' retouched '. 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letters to S. Laurence (Sept. 28) and 
F. Tennyson (Oct.), gives his impressions of the newly discovered 
portrait of Dante — ' all his great poem seems in it '. 

In Foreign Quarterly Review (Oct.), Art. viii, in an appreciation of 
Dante, the episode of Paolo and Francesca is described as unequalled 
in any work, ancient or modem. 

CoNNOP Thirlwall, in letter to Rev. F. Martin (Nov. 8), quotes 
Par. iii. 70-90 as Dante's solution of the difficulty cause's by the 
supposed inequality of reward. 

T. Moore : The Dream of Two Sisters (adapted from Purg. xxvii. 
94-108) ; in the preface to the collected edition of his poems he 
refers to Dante as ' that sternest of all satirists ' ; and in the New 
Hospital for Sick Literati he likens publishers' puffs to ' the ghosts 
of Dante's lay '. 

Keble, in Latin lecture as Professor of Poetry at Oxford, com- 
ments on Dante's choice of Virgil as his guide ' per arcana et infima 
loca ' {Praelect. xl). 

Bruce VVhyte, in vol. iii. of his Histoire des Langues Romanes et de 

leur Litterature, translates (in verse) ten poems from Dante's Can- 

zoniere, and a couple of passages (in terza rima) from the Commedia. 

[This work was written in English, but was never published, except in 

this French translation in which the English poetical renderings are 

preserved.] 

T. Hood, in My Trad, says that ' Popery has met with more 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 98 

efficient opponents in Dante, Boccaccio, and Rabelais, . . . than in 
all the M'NeJles, M'Ghees, and Macaws that have screamed in Exeter 
Hall ', 

William Spalding : account of the life and writings of Dante, 
with an analysis of the Commedia (in vol. ii. of Italy and the Italian 
Islands). 

Antonio Gallenga (' Luigi Mariotti '), in vol. i. of Italy : General 
Viezos of its History and Literature, devotes several chapters to Dante 
and his works, and emphasizes the debt of Italy to him — ' Dante 
gave his country a language, and language is the soul of nations.' 

Thomas Henry White, in Fragments of Italy and the Rhineland, 
remarks that Florence bears the stamp of Dante on her streets, and 
speaks scornfully of the monument to him in Santa Croce ' erected 
by — subscription ! ' (pp. 130, 155 ff.). 

Lord Vehnon : L'Inferno, secondo il testo di B. Lombardi, con 
ordine e schiarimento per uso dei Forestieri. (Firenze.) 

c. 1842 
Seymour Kirkup : pencil drawing of ' Portrait of Dante by 
Giotto in the Bargello at Florence ' (engra^•ed by Lasinio as frontis- 
piece to Lord Vernon's L'Inferno di Dante. Firenze, 1842- — first 
sketch, before the addition of the right hand holding the three pome- 
granates, and of the eye) ; pencil drawing of the same (engraved by 
G. Gumming as illustration to C. Lyell's Poems of the Vita Nuova 
and Convito of Dante, Lond., 1842 — second sketch, with the right 
hand, holding three pomegranates, added and the eye restored) ; 
water-colour drawing of the same, made from the coloured sketch 
and tracing of 1840 (this drawing was subsequently reproduced by 
Vincent Brooks for the Arundel Society in a chromolithograph, 
which was published in 1859). About this date Kirkup also made 
forty-nine drawings of Dante subjects, which were engraved as 
illustrations of the third (Albimi) volume of the Vernon Dante 
(pub. in 1865). 

1842 

S. Kirkup, in letter to B. R. Haydon, from Florence (Jan. 4), says. 
' my great resource and constant companion is Dante. He is a world 
of himself, or rather three worlds, and what worlds ! ' ; in letter to 
Charles Lyell (Feb. 27), he discusses the Torrigiani bust of Dante, 
and the several masks. 

H. F. Gary, in letters to Rev. W. Digby (Feb. 11 ; June 6 ; July 22), 
discusses the forthcoming fourth edition of his translation, and 
mentions a ' pirated ' American edition. 



94 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

18i2— continued. 

T. Moore, in his Diary (May 11), compares his fame on being 
recognized by a London cabman with that of Dante with the women 
of Verona after his supposed return from the imder- world. 

John Ruskin, in letter to S. Rogers from Venice (June 28), 
suggests that if Dante had seen the lounging Venetians of that 
day he would have added another scene to his Inferno for their 
benefit. 

G. RossETTi : La Beatrice di Dante. Ragionamenti critici. 

(Londra.) 

[Published by Rolaudi. The book is intended to prove that Beatrice was 
not in any sense a real woman, but an embodiment of Philosophy.] 

Chakles Lock Eastlake, in A Handbook oftlie History ofPaintiiig, 
gives an account of the discovery of the Giotto portrait of Dante 
(p. 50, n.) ; and k propos of the frescoes in the Campo Santo at Pisa 
compares Orcagna and Dante (p. 70). 

Chaeles Hindley : A Plain and Direct Translation of the Inferno 
of Dante . . . with Explanatory Notes. (Lond.) 

[In prose ; does not extend beyond Inf. iv. 57. Reviewed in Spectator, 
July.] 

Alexander Andrew Knox, in Giotto and Francesca, and other 
Poems, in the first poem refers to Dante's Beatrice as ' her who 
captive held in flowery chain The grand old man who raised Hell's 
portal bar ' (st. 32). 

Tennyson, in revised version of The Palace of Art (1882), speaks 
of ' the world- worn Dante ', who ' somewhat grimly smiled ', and of 
Verulam, 'the first of those who know ' {Inf. iv. 181) ; in Locksley 
Hall, he introduces a reminiscence of Inf. v. 121-3 in the lines, 'This 
is truth the poet sings. That a sorrow's crown of sorrow is remembering 
happier things.' 

[In this year Ulysses, composed c. 1834, was first published.] 

Frances Trollope, in A Visit to Italy, at Pisa discourses of 
Ugolino and the ' Torre della Fame ' (i. 72-8) ; at Florence, of the 
' Sasso di Dante', of the Baptistery (quoting Inf. xix. 17, and Par. 
XV. 134), and of the Dante monument in Santa Croce (i. 10.5-6, 208- 
10) ; and at Bagni di Lucca laments the decay of the study of Italian 
in England, and especially of the Commedia (i. 334-5). 

Charles Lyell : The Poems of the Vita Nuova and ConvUo of 

Dante Alighicri, Italian and English. (Lond.) 

[Dedicated to Cary. A revised version of the translations contained in 
the edition of 1835.] 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 95 

Sir F. Palgrave, in Handbook for Travellers in Northern Italy, 
introduces numerous quotations from the Commedia in connexion 
with places mentioned by Dante, in accordance with Jiis statement 
in the preface, ' whenever an apposite historical or descriptive 
passage has occurred to us in Dante, we have inserted it.' 

R. Browning, in Dramatic Lyrics, introduces Dante in ' Up at 
a Villa — down in the City ' (st. 9), and ' the stone of Dante ' in 
' Old Pictures in Florence ' (st. 33). 

Lord Vernon : L'Inferno secondo il testo del P. B. Lombard!, 
disposto in ordine grammaticale, e corredato di dichiarazioni per uso 
degli Stranieri. (Firenze.) 

In Bibliotkeca Grenvilliana, a catalogue of the most valuable items 
in the library of Rt. Hon. Thomas Grenville, are registered many 
very rare editions of the Commedia (Pt. i, pp. 178-9, 831), including 
the editio princeps (Foligno, 1472), the undated Naples edition of 
F. del Tuppo, the Florentine edition of 1481, with 19 plates, and 
the Aldine of 1502, on vellum. 

Dante Alighieri (in Encyclopaedia Britannica, Edin., vi. 617-19). 

Sale at Winchester of the library of G. F. Nott, late Fellow of All 
Souls, which contained a large number of Dante items, including 
three MSS. and upwards of eighty printed editions of the Commedia ; 
-several editions of the Vita Nuova and Convizno ; and a MS. of 
Boccaccio's Vita di Dante. 

Henry Nelson O'Neil : oil painting of ' Paul and Francesca of 
Rimini' {Inf. v. 127, 132-8). (R.A., No. 258.) 

W. S. P. Henderson : oil painthig of ' The sunny days of old ' 
(Inf V. 127 ff.). (R.A., No. .523.) 

Henry W. Phillips : drawing of ' The Torrigiani Bust of Dante at 
Florence ' (lithographed by R. J. Lane, as frontispiece to C. Lyell's 
Poems of the Vita Nuova and Convito of Dante). 

Anon. : outline drawing of the above bust (engraved as illustra- 
tion to the above work of C. Lyell). 

M. L. : drawing of ' Plan of localities in Florence connected with 
the life of Dante ' (engraved by G. Gumming as illustration to the 
above work of C. Lyell). 

John Henry Robinson : portrait of Dante (engraved as frontis- 
piece to vol. ii. of Foscolo's edition of the Divina Commedia. Lond., 
1842). 

Anon. : drawing of ' The Inferno of Dante ' (engraved as illustra- 
tion to vol. ii. of Foscolo's edition of the Divina Commedia). 



96 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1842-3 

La Commedia di Dante Alighieri illustrata da Ugo Foscolo. 

(Londra, 4 vols., 8vo.) 

[Published by Rolandi ; edited by G. Mazzini. Reviewed in Athenaeum, 
Dec. 1843.] 

1843 

Dante and the Catliolic Philosophy in the Thirteenth Century (in 
British Critic and Quarterly Theological Journal, Jan). 

H. F. Cary, in letters to Rev. W. Digby (Jan. 16 ; Oct. 9), reports 
progress of the fourth edition of his translation ; in letters to C. Lyell 
(Aug. 29 ; Sept. 5), he refers to Lyell's translation of Dante's lyrical 
poems, and expresses his agreement with Lyell's views of Dante's 
religious principles. 

S. KiRKUP, in letter to G. Rossetti from Florence (Feb. 5), discusses 
the three pomegranates in the Giotto portrait of Dante. 

Macaulay, in letter to Macvey Napier (Feb. 6), applies to Addison 
Dante's address to Virgil (Inf. i. 83-4) ; in his ' Essay on the Life 
and Writings of Addison ', in Edinburgh Review (July), he notes 
Addison's omission to mention Dante in his ' Travels in Italy ', 
and remarks that ' he wanders up and down Rimini without one 
thought of Francesca '. 

J. H. Merivale, in letter to Leonard Horner (Feb. '13), discusses 
Francis Horner's criticisms of Dante, and deprecates his depreciation 
of the Purgatorio. 

J. G. LocKHART, in ' Theodore Hook ', in Quarterly Review (May), 
records that Coleridge, in the course of a dissertation on the distinc- 
tion between talent and genius, 'declared that Hook was as true 
a genius as Dante '. 

William Dowe : translation (in eight-line stanzas) of ' The Death 
of Ugolino ' {Inf. xxxiii. 37-75) (in Dublin University Magazine, 
June). 

W. S. Landor, in ' Francesco Petrarca ', in Foreign Quarterly 
Review (July), compares the genius of Boccaccio with that of Dante, 
and remarks upon Petrarch's jealousy of Dante ; in letter to John 
Forster, he mentions Dante, with Homer, Shakespeare, and Milton, 
as ' the four giants who lived before our last Deluge of poetry '. 

G. Mazzini, in ' Thomas Carlyle ', in British and Foreign Review 
(Oct.), quotes what Dante says in the De Monarchia (i. 3, 11. 30-6) as 
to the necessity of collective effort, and points to Par. xxv. 1-9 as 
proof that Dante, like certain other great men of genius, was not 
unconscious of his own powers. 

In the Catalogus Librorum Impressorum Bibliothecae Bodleianae are 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 97 

registered seven Cent. XV and six Cent. XVI editions of the 
Comniedia, besides the first editions of the De Monorchia (1559) and 
Vita Nuova (1576). 

OcTAViAN Blevvitt, in Handbook fan' Travellers in Central Italy, 
quotes numerous passages from the Commedia in connexion with 
places mentioned by Dante ; in the section on Rome (by J. B. Pent- 
land) Michael Angelo's indebtedness to Dante in his fresco of the 
' Last Judgment ' is pointed out, especially the detail from Inf. 
iii. 111. 

John Dayman : The Inferno of Dante Alighieri, translated in the 
terza rima of the Original, with Notes and Appendix. (Lond.) 

[The first English transiation in terza rima of the whole of the Inferno. 
Reviewed in Spectator, Aug. 19 ; Athenaeum, March 23, 1844 ; Westminster 
Retxiew, .Jan. 1861.] 

Lord Brougham, in ' Camille Desmoulins ', in Historical Sketches 
of Statesmen in the time of George III (third series), a propos of the 
personalities indulged in by members of the Convention, quotes the 
scene between Maestro Adamo and Sinon in Inf. xxx. 100-48. 

Carlyle, in Past and Present, says that the sight of a workhouse 
was a reminder of Dante's Hell (Bk. i, ch. 1) ; speaks of the dwellings 
of the poor as ' Ugolino Hunger-cellars ' (Inf. xxxiii. 22-3) (Bk. iii. 
ch. 7) ; and enforces the counsel, ' follow thy star through Chaos 
and the murk of Hell,' with quotations from Inf. xv. 55, and Par. 
XXV. 3, and from Boccaccio's Vita di Dante (Bk. iii, ch. 12). 

Anon. : drawings of ' The Purgatorio and Paradiso of Dante ' ; 
of ' Portrait of Dante, after Kirkup's drawing from Giotto's fresco ' ; 
and of ' The Tomb of Dante at Ravenna ' (engraved as illustrations to 
vols. iii. and iv. of Foscolo's edition of the Divina Commedia, 1842-3. 

James Hopwood : portrait of Dante (engraved as frontispiece to 
I Quattro Poeti Italiani, Paris, 1843). 

T. F. BoDDiNGTON : oil painting of ' II Canzone di Sera ' (Par. xiv. 
87-8). (Brit. Inst., No. 170.) 

George Patten : oil painting of ' Dante accompanied by Virgil 
in his descent to the Inferno, recognizes his three countrymen, 
Rusticucci, Aldobrandi, and Guidoguerra' (Inf. xvi. 4 ff.). (R.A,, 
No. 67 ; Brit. Inst., No. 15, in 1844 ; Paris Exhib., 1855.) 

Frederick R. Pickersgill : oil painting of ' Dante's Dream ' 
(Purg. xxvii. 99, 101-3). (R.A., No. 155.) 

1844 

Romance in Italy : Ugolino {Inf. xxxiii) (in Foreign and Colonial 
Quarterly Review, Jan.). 



98 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 844 — continued. 

W. E. Gladstone, in letter to Mrs. Gladstone (Jan. 21), directs 
her attention to the speech of Piccarda {Par. iii. 43-87), which he 
calls ' a rare gem ', quoting 1. 85. 

H. F. Gary : The Vision ; or Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, of 

Dante Alighieri. A new edition, corrected. With the Life of Dante, 

Chronological View of his Age, additional Notes, and Index. (Lond.) 

[The fourth edition, and last in Gary's lifetime. There were two issues, one 
in 12nio at 10s. 6d. ; the other, in double columns, in 8vo at 6s. Reviewed 
in Examiner, March 15, 1843 ; Westminsler Review, Jan. 1861.] 

H. F. Gary, in letters to Rev. W. Digby (Feb. 7 ; March 6 ; April 
10), reports an American demand for his Dante, and announces that 
the cheap (8vo.) issue of his fourth edition was sold out in the first 
fortnight ; in letters to G. Lyell (May 1, 15), he refers to the latter's 
versions of the Vita Nuova and Convito (see under c. 1830); and 
criticizes Fraticelli's ' canon ' with regard to Dante's Canzoniere. 

G. Mazzini : Dante AUighieri (in Foreign Quarterly Review, April). 

Lord John Russell : translation (in heroic couplets) of ' Fran- 
cesca da Rimini ' (Inf. v. 73-142) (in Literary Souvenir). 

In English Review (April), Art. v, the above and other English 
translations of Dante are reviewed, and an estimate is given of Dante 
and of the Commedia. 

In Athenaeum (Aug. 24) is an obituary notice of H. F. Gary (who 
died Aug. 14, and was buried in AVestminster Abbey, Aug. 21), in 
which his translation of Dante is described as ' one of the master- 
pieces in our language, which will ensure his name an abiding place 
in our literature, in connexion with that of the Florentine poet '. 

Macaulay, in ' Essay on the Earl of Chatham ', in Edinburgh 
Review (Oct.), applies Dante's description of the change of forms 
between Agnello Brunelleschi and a serpent (Inf. xxv. 49-141) to 
the state of EngUsh political parties under George I. 

Leigh Hunt, in Imagination and Fancy, gives illustrations from 
the Commedia, and among other passages quotes and translates in 
blank verse Dante's description of the Giants {Inf. xxxi. 34-48, 
58-60, 67-81). 

Pictures from Dante, in the version of Wright. Selected by the 
Translator. (Lond.) 

J. H. Merivale, in Poems Original and Translated (new and 
corrected edition), further criticizes recent translations of the 
Commedia, and prints revised versions of his own previous transla- 
tions (see under 1838). 

Mrs. Shelley, in Rambles in Germany and Italy, quotes many 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 99 

passages from the Commedia, chiefly in connexion with Dante's 
descriptions of Italian scenery ; and expresses her preference for the 
Purgatorio and Paradiso, though she holds that there are ' finer 
passages ' in the lyiferno than in either (i. 96). 

Elizabeth B. Barrett, in A Vision of Poets, speaks of ' Dante 
stern and sweet ' (st. 118), and describes him as ' poor in mirth ' 
(st. 111-12) ; in An Island, she likens the hills of her dream-island to 
' that mountain piece Of Dante's Paradise ' (st. 4). 

Benjamin D'Israeli, in Coningsby, makes Sidonia observe that 
bad music makes him feel himself ' in the last circle of the Inferno ' ; 
the Princess remarks, ' I wish that liti were a little more Dantesque ' 
(Bk. iv, ch. 11) ; subsequently she is represented 'lying on a sofa, 
in her boudoir, reading the Inferno ' (Bk. v, ch. 6). 

George Lillie Craik, in vol. iii. of his Sketches of the History of 
Literature and Learning in England, among other references to Dante 
in connexion with Chaucer and Spenser, remarks that the greatest 
poets, such as Homer, Dante, Chaucer, &c., have also been the 
greatest men (iii. 88). 

Thomas Wright, in St. Patrick's Purgatory ; an Essay on the 
Legends of Purgatory, Hell, and Paradise, current during the Middle 
Ages, gives an account of the Vision of Alberic and discusses its 
relation to the Commedia (pp. 117-22), of which he gives an analysis 
(pp. 122-8). 

Thomas John Mazzinghi : A brief Notice of the recent Researches 
respecting Dante Alighieri. (Lond.) 

Thomas Bridgford : oil painting of 'Beatrice'. (R.A., No. 161.) 

George Scharf : drawing of ' Dante, with Hell, Purgatory, 
Paradise, and Florence ' (after the picture by Domenico di Michelino 
over the north door of the Duomo at Florence ; engraved by Dalziel 
as illustration to F. Pollock's translation of the Commedia, Lond., 
1854). 

1845 

Charles Lyell : The Lyrical Poems of Dante Alighieri, including 

the Poems of the Vita Nuova and Convito. (Lond.) 

[Revised versions of the poems included in the edition of 1842, with twelve 
added.] 

I. C. Wright : Dante, Translated ; Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso. 
New Edition, revised and corrected. (Lond., 3 vols., 12mo.) 
[The first collected edition.] 
Theodore Martin : Dante and Beatrice (with verse translations 
of the poems of the Vita Nuova) (in Tait's Edinburgh Magazine, 
xii). 

H2 



100 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1845 — continued. 

Sir Archibald Alison : Homer, Dante, and Michael Angelo (in 
Blackwood's Magazine, Jan.). 

W. S. Landor : Imaginary Conversation — Dante and Beatrice (in 
Hood's Magazine and Comic Miscellany, March). 

Robert Browning, in letter to E. B. Barrett (April 30), says, 
' Italy is stuff for the use of the North, and no more— pure Poetry 
there is none, nearly as possible none, in Dante even '. She answers 
(May 2), 'Dante's poetry only materials for the northern rhymers ! 
. . . Dante's poetry seems to come down in hail, rather than in rain — 
but count me the drops congealed in one hailstone!'. He replies 
(May 8), ' I intended ... to bring Italian Poets round to their 
old place again in my heart . . . anyhow Dante is out of it all, as who 
knows but I, with all of him in my head and heart ? ' 

E. B. Barrett, in letter to R. Browning (July 4), admitting that 
' there is a natural inferiority of mind in women — of the intellect ', 
says, ' Vittoria Colonna does walk near Dante ' ; to the same 
(Dec. 2), ' How slow (to the ear and mind) that Italian rhetoric is ! 
a language for dreamers and declaimers. Yet Dante made it for 
action.' 

R. Browning, in letter to E. B. Barrett (Dec. 22), a propos of his 
own ' Sordello ', quotes and translates (in blank verse) Purg. v. 52-7. 

1845-6 
Thomas Wade : translation (terza rima) of the Inferno. 

[Unpublished ; the MS. formerly in possession of H. Buxton Forman, is 
now in the Macauley Collection at the University of Pennsylvania. Speci- 
mens (InJ. i. 1-42 ; xxxiv. 127-39) were printed in Nob Quarterhj Review, 
April 1877.] 

1845-7 

George Frederick Watts : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca '. 
(Brit. Inst., No. 82, 1848.) 

[Different design from that of 1879 — Francesca's head does not rest on 
Paolo's shoulder ; Dante and Virgil are seen to the right.] 

1846 

James Glassford : translation (verse) of Son. xxiv {V.N., § 41) 
(in Lyrical Compositions from the Italian Poets, Lond.). 

Leigh Hunt : notice of Dante, with prose summary of the 
Commedia, numerous translations (in prose and verse) from Dante's 
works, and verse translations of Inf. v. 70-142 (' Story of Paulo and 
Francesca ') ; Inf. xxxii. 124-xxxiii. 90 (' Story of Ugolino ') ; 
Par. XV. 97-129 (' Florence in the time of Dante's Ancestors ') (in 
Stories from the Italian Poets, Lond., vol. i). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 101 

Lord Veknon : Chiose sopra Dante ; testo inedito ora per la 

prima volta pubblicato. (Firenze.) 

Joseph Garrow : The Early Life of Dante Alighieri. (Florence.) 

[The first published English translation of the Vila Nuova. Reviewed in 
Athenaeum, Oct. 10, Nov. 21 ; and (prol)ably by W. S. Landor) in 
Examiner, Oct. 17.] 

H. E. Napier : Villani's notice of Dante, and blank verse render- 
ings of numerous passages from the Commedia (in Florentine History, 
vols. i-ii). 

Lord Vernon : Petri AUegherii super Dantis ipsius Genitoris 
Comoediam Commentariuni, nunc primuni in lucem editum. 
(Florentiae.) 

W. S. Landor : Imaginary Conversation — Dante and Gemma 
Donati (in Works, 1846, vol. ii). 

George Darley : Dante's Beatrice (in Atheiiaeum, Nov. 21). 

R. A. : Dante's Beatrice (in Athenaeum, Dec. 5). 

William Nind : translation {terza rima) of Inf. i (in The Legend 
of Latimer, and other Poems, Lond.). 

RusKiN, in vol. ii. of Modern Painters, among other references to 
Dante, says ' there is no tenderness like Dante's, neither any intensity 
or seriousness like his, such seriousness that it is incapable of per- 
ceiving that which is commonplace or ridiculous, but fuses all down 
into its own white-hot fire ' (ii. ch. 3, § 10). 

Solomon Alexander H.^rt : oil painting of ' Dante Alighieri ' 
{Inf. xxiii. 94-5). (R.A., No. 292.) 

David Scott : oil painting of ' Dante and Beatrice '. (R.S.A., 
No. 232.) 

Matthew Wood : oil painting of ' Beatrice '. (Brit. Inst., No. 75.) 

1847 

T. Medwin, in vol. ii. of his Life of Shelley, prints Shelley's transla- 
tions of Purg. xxviii. 1-51, and (in collaboration with himself) Inf. 
xxxiii. 22-75 ; and Byron's and Shelley's opinions of the Commedia, 

J. G. Grant : Madonna Pia {Purg. v. 132-6) and other Poems. 
(Lond.) 

Lord Vernon : Dantis Aligherii Legatio pro Franceschino Mala- 
spina . . . denuo recognita et iterum in lucem edita. (Pisis.) 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letter to E. B. Cowell, observes that the 
vision of Time, suggested to the geologist looking at Niagara, is 
more wonderful than all the conceptions of Dante and Milton. 

Theodore Martin : The Vita Nuova of Dante (in Dublin Univer- 
sity Magazine, April). 



102 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 847 — continued. 

A. Gallenga (' L. Mariotti ') : The Spirit of Dante (in New 
Monthly Magazine, May). 

Genealogy of the Poet Dante (in The Patricians, Sept.). 

Anox : Portrait of Dante, after Raphael Morghen (engraved as 
frontispiece to Gary's Dante, Lond., 1847). 

1848 
Earl of Ashburnham purchases the Libri and Barrois MSS., 
including seventeen MSS. of the Commedia. 

[In May 1884 the Libri MSS. and others from the Ashburnham collection, 
including in all twenty-seven MSS. of the Commedia, were purchased by 
the Italian Government for £23,000, and are now in the Laurentian Library 
at Florence.] 

Lord Vernon : Chiose alia Cantica dell' Inferno di Dante AUi- 
ghieri, attribuite a Jacopo suo figlio ; ora per la prima volta date 
in luce. (Firenze.) 

Lord Vernon : Comento alia Cantica dell' Inferno di Dante 
AUighieri di Autore Anonimo ; ora per la prima volta dato in luce. 
(Firenze.) 

AuGUSTiN Prichard: translation (in rhymed quatrains) of sundry 
passages from the Commedia, in Humboldt's Cosmos from the German 
(ii. 102 ff.). 

Elizabeth B. Browning, in Part i of Casa Guidi Windows, apos- 
trophizes Dante, alluding to 'il sasso di Dante ' at Florence, his tomb 
at Ravenna, and monument in Santa Croce, the Giotto portrait in the 
Bargello, and his meeting with Beatrice described in § 2 of the Vita 
Nuova (in Poetical Works, ed. 1872, iii. 259-61) ; in letter to Miss Mit- 
ford (April 15), she refers again to ' the famous stone where Dante 
drew his chair out to sit ' ; to the same (Aug. 24) she writes of the 
Tuscans, ' the people wants stamina, wants conscience, wants self- 
reverence. Dante's soul has died out of the land.' 

John Harwood : oil painting of ' Francesca da Rimini ' {Inf. 
V. 127). (Brit. Inst., No. 349.) 

A. WooLMER : oil painting of ' Reading Dante '. (Soc. Brit. 
Artists, No. 323.) 

1849 
John Aitken Carlyle : Dante's Divine Comedy : The Inferno. 
A Literal Prose Translation. (Lond.) 

[The first published EngU.sh prose translation of the Inferno. Carlyle in- 
tended to translate the whole of the Commedia, and actually finished ' the 
greater part of the Purgatorio', as he states in the preface to his second 
edition (1867) ; but no more was published. Reviewed in Examiner, 
Feb. 3; Athermeum, March 10 ; Christian Remembrancer, Jan. 1850; 
Dublin University Magazine, Sept. 1853 ; Westminster Reviexv, Jan. 1S61.] 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 103 

A. Gallenga (' L. Mariotti ') : Dante (in Italy, Past and Present. 
Lond.). 

Elizabeth B. Browning, in A Child's Grave at Florence, alludes 
(st. 6) to Par. xvi. 152-4, the conversion of the Florentine lily from 
white to crimson. 

Henry Clark Barlow : Dante's Opinion of the Temporal Power 
of the Pope (in Examiner, July 14). 

In the Gentleman's Magazine (Oct., N.S. xxxii. 343) are printed 
fifteen lines of Gray's translation of the Ugolino episode (see c. 1737). 

William Brodie : bust of ' Dante '. (R.S.A., No. 602.) 

R. F. Abraham : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francisca ; from 
Dante '. (Brit. Inst., No. 275.) 

R. YoiTNG : Portrait of Dante, after Raphael Morghen (engraved 
as frontispiece to J. A. Carlyle's translation of the Inferno). 

Dante Gabriel Rossetti ^ : pen-and-ink sketches of ' First 
Anniversary of the Death of Beatrice (Dante drawing an Angel)' 
(V.N., § 35, 11. 1-13) ; ' Giotto painting Dante's Portrait' (in Bir- 
mingham Art Gallery) ; pencil sketch for ' Dante sees Beatrice at a 
Marriage Feast ' (V.N., § 14, 11. 15-57) (in Birmingham Art Gallery). 

1849-50 

D. G. Rossetti : pen-and-ink sketch of triptych of ' II Saluto 
di Beatrice ' {V.N., § 3, 11. 5-15 ; Purg. xxx. 70-8). 

c. 1850 

E. B. Browning : translation (terza rima) of Inf. i (printed in 
Elizabeth Barrett Browning's hitherto unpublished Poems and Stories, 
ed. H. Buxton Forman, Boston, Mass., priv. pr., 1914, ii. 288-48). 

Frederic Leighton : silver - point of ' Paolo and Francesca ' 
(Inf. V. 133-6) (in Leighton House Gallery). 

D. G. Rossetti : pen-and-ink sketches of ' Dante, Beatrice, and 
Love ' {V.N., § 2, 11. 31-2), and ' Dante meeting Beatrice in Paradise ' 
{Purg. xxx. 70-3) (in Birmingham Art Gallery). 

1850 
Patrick Bannerman : The Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Trans- 
lated (in heroic verse). (Edin.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, June 8 ; Wesiminster Review, Jan. 1861.] 
H. C. Barlow : La Divina Commedia. Remarks on the Reading 
of Inf. v. 59. (Lond.) 

Lord Vernon : Serie Cronologica delle Edizioni dell' intero testo 

' For the identification of Uossetti's numerous Dante pictures, see Toynbec, 
' Chronological List, with Notes, of Paintings and Drawings from Dante, by 
Dante Gabriel Rossetti ', in Scritti Varii di Ervclizione e di Critica in Onore di 
R. Renter. Torino, 1912. 



104 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1850 — continued. 

e delle parti separate della Divina Commedia prodotte in luce fino 
al 1850 ; delle sue Traduzioni, de' suoi Comenti, e delle principali 
Opere che servono ad illustrarla. (Firenze.) 

Richard William Church : Dante (in Christian Remembrancer, 
Jan.). 

[Republished in book form in 1854 ; reprinted in 1878.] 

J. P. : Francesca da Rimini (verse trans, of Inf. v. 73-142) (in 
TaiVs Edinburgh Magazine, May). 

S. KiRKUP : Giotto's Portrait of Dante (in Spectator, May 11). 

G. A. Bezzi : Dante's Portrait (in Spectator, May 25). 

G. B. Cavalcaselle : Giotto's Portrait of Dante (in Spectator, 
July 13). 

J. Cayley : translation (verse) of Inf. ix. 87-106 ; iii. 1-186 ; 
vi. 4-99 (in Critic, Sept. 14, Oct. 1, 15). 

W. S. Landor : Dante (poem) (in Eraser's Magazine, Dec). 

William Brodie : marble bust of ' Dante '. (R.S.A., No. 461.) 

John Hancock : marble statue of ' Beatrice ' {Son. xxix). (R.A., 
No. 1303 ; Paris Exhib., 1855.) 

1851 

Charles Bagot Cayley : Dante's Divine Comedy. The Vision 

of Hell : translated in the original ternary rhyme. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Sept. 6 ; Spectator, Oct. 11 ; Examiner, Oct. 25 ; 
Literary Gazette, Nov. 22.] 

Felicia Hemans : The Maremma (Purg. v. 188-6) (in Tales and 
Historic Scenes, Edin.). 

E. B. Browning, in Part ii of Casa Guidi Windows (11. 8 ff.) 
apostrophizes ' Dante's Florence '. 

Leonard Francis Simpson : translation (terza rima) of the 
Francesca episode {Inf. v. 97-107, 116-42), and of sundry passages 
from Dante's prose works, in The Literature of Italy. 

George Scharf : drawings of Giotto's portrait of Dante, and of 
Raphael's fresco of Parnassus in the Vatican, with the figure of Dante 
(engraved as illustrations of Kugler's Schools of Painting in Italy, 
Lond., 1851). 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colour of ' Dante sees Beatrice at a 
Marriage-Feast ' {V.N., § 14, 11. 15-57). 

Joseph Noel Paton ; oil painting of ' Death of Paolo and 
Francesca da Rimini '. (R.S.A,, No. 171.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 105 

1852 

Frances Joanna Bunbury : The Life and Times of Dante 
Alighieri. From the Italian of Count Cesare Balbo. (Lond., 2 vols.) 

E. O'DoNNELL : Translation of the Divina Commedia of Dante 
Alighieri. (Lond.) 

[The first complete English prose translation.] 

J. M. : ' Was Dante ever at Oxford ? ' (in Notes and Queries, 
July 31). 

J. Noel Paton, oil painting of ' Dante meditating the episode of 
Francesca da Rimini and Paolo Malatesta '. (R.S.A., No. 83 ; in 
the Wrigley collection in Bury Art Gallery.) 

Alexander Munro : marble group of ' Paolo e Francesca ' {Inf. 
V. 127-38). (R.A., No. 1340 ; subsequently in possession of W. E. 
Gladstone.) 

William Bell Scott : oil painting of ' Boccaccio's Visit to Dante's 
Daughter '. (Brit. Inst., No. 435.) 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colours of ' Giotto painting Dante's 
Portrait ' ; ' Meeting of Dante and Beatrice in Paradise ' {Purg. 
XXX. 70-3). 

1853 

The British Museum acquires by purchase at Dr. Hawtrey's sale 
a Cent. XIV MS. of the Divina Commedia (MS. 19587). 

C. B. Cayley : Dante's Divine Comedy. The Purgatory : trans- 
lated in the original ternary rhyme. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Dublin University Magazine, Sept. ; Athenaeum, Dec. 18.] 
Dante, Milton, and Aeschylus (in TaiVs Edinburgh Magazine, 
XX. 513 ff.). 

W. S. Landor : poem on Dante, in Last Fruit off an Old Tree ; 
in ' Francesco Petrarca ' he says that Dante is surpassed by Shake- 
speare alone in his description of love ; and declares that there is 
nothing in Italian literature so beautiful as the episode of Francesca. 
RuSKiN, in vol. ii. of Stones of Venice, says, ' Every line of the 
Paradiso is full of the most exquisite and spiritual expressions of 
Christian truth ' (ch. 8, § 57) ; and in vol. iii, ' I think that the 
central man of all the world, as representing in perfect balance the 
imaginative, moral, and intellectual faculties, all at their highest, 
is Dante ' (§ 67). 

D. G. RossETTi : oil painting of ' Dante's Resolve to write the 
Commedia in memory of Beatrice' {V.N., § 43, II. 1-11) (unfinished); 
water-colour of ' Dante on the Anniversary of the Death of Beatrice '. 
(Dante drawing an Angel) {V.N., § 35, 11. 1-13) (in Taylorian Gallery 
at Oxford). 



106 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 853 — continued. 
F. Leightox : silver-point of ' Face of Dante ' (in possession of 
Mr. Geo. Musgrave at Oxford). 

1854 
I. C. Wright : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alif;hieri. Trans- 
lated into English verse. Third edition, revised. (Lond.) 

C. B. Cayley : Dante's Divine Comedy. The Paradise : trans- 
lated in the original ternary rhyme. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Spectator, April 1 ; North British liexnew, Aug.] 
William Frederick Pollock : The Divine Comedy ; or, The 
Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise of Dante Alighieri. Rendered into 
English (blank verse). (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Examiner, Jan. 8 ; Spectator, April 1 ; Athenaeum, July 8 ; 
Westminster Review, Jan. 1861.] 

TiioJiAS Brooksbank : Dante's Divine Comedy. The First Part : 

Hell. Translated in the Metre of the Orginal, with Notes. (Lond.) 

[No more was published. Reviewed in North British Review, Aug. ; 
Athenaeum, March 24, 1855 ; Westminster Review, Jan. 1861 : Blackwood's 
Magazine, .Tune 1867. J 

Francis Turner Palgrave : Dante to Beatrice (two poems) (in 
Idylls and Songs. Lond.). 

Sydney Dobei.l, in Balder (sc. xxiii), apostrophizes Dante. 

Ruskin, in Giotto and his Works, quotes and comments on the 
episode of Rinaldo degli Scrovigni (Inf. xvii. 64 ff.). 

Richard Shilleto : translation (Latin hexameters) of Inf. vii. 
61-84 (' Fortuna ') (printed in Arundines Cami. Camb., 1860.) 

Dante's Beatrice (in British Quaiierly Review, Jan.). 

Dante and his Translators (in Dublin University Magazine, May). 

Dante and his Interpreters (in North British Revieiv, Aug.). 

W. W. Fyfe : Sketches of Great Authors : Dante (in Sharpens 
London Magazine, Aug.). 

H. C. Barlow : Letteratura Dantesca (in Morning Post, Aug. 31). 

W. H. F. : Dante and Tacitus (in Notes and Queries, Sept. 23). 

George Scharf : fifty-nine outline drawings, after Flaxman and 
others (engraved on wood by George and Edward Dalziel as illustra- 
tions to W. F. Pollock's translation of the Commedia). 

J. Noel Paton : oil pahiting of ' Dante and Beatrice in the Lunar 
Sphere ' (Par. ii). (R.S.A., No. 831.) 

Henry Stormonth Leifchild : marble group of ' Paolo e Fran- 
cesca di Rimino ' (Inf v. 106). (R.A., No. 1391.) 

John Hancock : bronze statuette of 'Dante's Beatrice' (Purg. 
XXX. 73). (R.A., No. 1416.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 107 

D. G. RosSETTi : pencil drawing of ' Paolo and Francesca ' {Inf. 

V. 127-36). 

c. 1855 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colour of ' The Boat of Love ' (Son. xxxii) ; 

pencil and ink drawing of ' Dante seated ' ; pencil drawings of 

' Dante at Verona, descending the Stairs of Can Grande's Palace ', 

' Dante and the Court-Jester at Verona ', and ' Dante and Beatrice '. 

1855 

C. B. Cayley : Dante's Divine Comedy : Notes. (Lond.) 

[Contains anonymous verse-rendering ot Son. xv (V.N., § 26).] 

Cardinal Wiseman : translation (blank verse) of Par. xxvii. 1-6 
(in Lecture on the Perception of Natural Beauty by the Ancients and 
Moderns. Lond.). 

Theodore Martin : Madonna Pia, a Tragedy in three Acts {Purg. 
V. 130-6). (Lond., priv. pr.) 

Dante Alighieri (in Lives oftlie Illustrious, vii. 241-52). 

Robert Browning, in One Word More, introduces (st. 5-8, 19) the 
episode of Dante drawing an Angel on the first anniversary of the 
death of Beatrice {V.N., § 35). 

Henry Hart Milman, in his History of Latin Christianity, among 
other references to Dante, gives an account of the De Monorchia 
(v. 391-3), of Dante's conceptions of Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise 
(vi. 426-8), and of Dante and his works, with a parallel between 
Dante and Tacitus (vi. 510-16). 

G. J. C. : translation [terza rima) oilnf. xxxii. 124-39 ; xxxiii. 1-88 
(' The Tower of Famine ') (in Fraser^s Magazine, Sept.). 

Italian Literature during the Trecento — Dante (in Dublin Univer- 
sity Magazine, Sept.). 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colours of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (triptych) 
(Inf. V. 74-5, 112-14, 127-36) ; ' Matilda gathering Flowers ' (Purg. 
xxviii. 37 ff.) ; ' Dante's Vision of Rachel and Leah ' (Purg. xxvii. 
97-108); 'Beatrice'. 

Sir Charles Lock Eastlake : oil painting of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., 
No. 120.) 

William Frederick Woodington : oil painting of ' A Vessel 
under conduct of an Angel, coming over the waves with Spirits to 
Purgatory ' {Purg. ii. 40 ff.). (R.A., No. 682.) 

T. M. BoucHiER Marshall : oil painting of ' Francesca ' {Inf. v). 
(R.A., No. 99.) 

F. Leighton : oil painting of ' Cimabue's celebrated Madonna 
carried in Procession through the Streets of Florence (Dante a 
spectator) '. (R.A., No. 569 ; purchased by Queen Victoria.) 



108 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1855-6 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colour of ' Dante sees Beatrice at a 
Marriage-Feast ' (replica of drawing of 1851). 

1856 

E. Monro : Dante, Goethe, and Shakespeare (in Parochial Lectures 
on English Poetry. Lond.). 

Dante and Italian Literature (in Methodist Quarterly, July). , 

RusKiN, in Harbours of England, quotes Dante's description of the 
Angel Pilot {Purg. ii. 16^5), and remarks on Dante's love of boats ; 
in vol. iii. of Modern Painters, he translates (in prose) numerous 
passages from the Commedia ; couples Dante and Spenser as ' masters 
of the spiritual world ' (ch. 8, § 7) ; contrasts Dante's Hell with that 
of Milton (ch. 14, § 29) ; analyses Dante's representation of landscape, 
and quotes and comments on his description {Purg. xxviii. 40-63) of 
Matilda (ch. 14, §§ 34-40), and of the vision of Rachel and Leah 
(Purg. xxvii. 97-108) (ch. 14, § 37) ; speaks of Dante as ' the great 
prophetic exponent of the heart of the Middle Ages ' (ch. 14, § 39) ; 
examines Dante's conception of rocks in Malebolge {Inf. xviii. 1 ff.) 
(ch. 15, §§ 3-7) ; criticizes Dante as a climber (ch. 15, § 13) ; notes 
his indifference to cloud effects (ch. 15, § 20) ; in vol. iv. of Modern 
Painters, remarks on his descriptions of rocks (ch. 16, § 19) ; contrasts 
Dante and Shakespeare (ch. 20, §§ 29, 30, 38). 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colour of 'Dante's Dream'. {V.N., § 23, 
11. 33-68.) 

William Gale : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (Inf. 
V. 44). (Brit. Inst., No. 406.) 

Alexander Munro : marble bust of ' Dante '. (R.A., No. 1304.) 

1857 

Whitley Stokes : translation (verse) of Son. xxxii (in ' Tuscan 
Proverbs ', in Eraser's Magazine, Jan.). 

Translations of Dante (in Christian Remembrancer, April). 

H. C. Barlow : Dante's Door at Florence (in Athenaeum, April 25) ; 
Dante's Portrait in the Bargello at Florence (in same, July 4) ; The 
Period of Dante's Vision (in .^ame, Nov. 28) ; Letteratura Dantesca. 
Remarks on the reading of Paradise, vii. 114. (Lend.) 

Emilie A. Hawkes : Dante (in Imperial Dictionary of Universal 
Biography. Lond.). 

Frederick Denison Maurice : Dante, in ' Mediaeval Philosophy ', 
in vol. iii. of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy. (Lond.) 

Alexander Munro : marble bust of ' Beatrice '. (R. A., No. 1306.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 109 

Hekry Weioall, jun. : oil painting, from Inf. v. 121-3. (Brit, 
Inst., No. 443.) 

1858 

Lord Vernon : Le Prime Quattro Edizioni della Divina Com- 
media, letteralmente ristampate. (Londra.) 

Lord Vernon : L'Inferno di Dante Alighieri, Disposto in ordine 
grammaticale, e corredato di brevi Dichiarazioni, vol. i. (Londra.) 

Raymond de Vericour : The Life and Times of Dante. 
(Lend.) 

Matthew Arnold, in his Note-books (ed. Mrs. Wodehouse, Lond. 
1902), quotes Inf. xxiv. 46-8 ; xvi. 61-8 ; xxvi. 21-4. 

A. M. G. : Count Ugolino (Inf. xxxiii) (in Monthly Packet, Feb.). 

A. R. B. : Italian Literature — Dante (in Eraser's Magazine, April). 

H. C. Barlow : Fonte Branda and the Casentino (Inf. xxx. 78) 
(in Athenaeum, July 3) ; Francesca da Rimini (in sa7ne, Nov. 27) ; 
Proposed Dante Festival at Florence (in same. Dee. 25). 

Dante (in Eclectic Review, Dec.). 

Henry Weigall, jun. : oil painting of ' Beatrice di Dante '. 
(Brit. Inst., No. 189.) 

Alfred W. Elmore : oil painting of ' An Incident in the life of 
Dante ' (Dante returned from Hell). (R.A., No. 8.) 

D. G. Rossetti : pen-and-ink drawing of ' Dante and his Circle ' 
(burlesque on the title of the translations from Dante and his con- 
temporaries, upon which he was engaged). 

1859 

The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Libri sale a 
Cent. XV MS. of the Divina Commedia (MS. 22780). 

H. C. Barlow : The Slavina di Marco (Inf. xii. 4-9) (in Athenaeum, 
March 5) ; The Casato of Dante (in same, March 26) ; Le Prime Quattro 
Edizioni della Divina Commedia (in same, April 23 ; Morning Post, 
April 23) ; On the Reading ' sugger dette ' (Inf. v. 59) in the Antaldi 
Codice in the British Museum (in Athenaeum, April 30) ; The ' Veltro' 
of Dante (in same, Nov. 26) ; Francesca da Rimini, her Lament and 
Vindication ; with a brief Notice of the Malatesti. (Lond.) 

H. H. : Dante (sonnet) (in Chambers's Journal, April 9). 

H. A. J. Munro : translation (Latin hexameters) of Inf. xxxiv. 
22-54 ; V. 97-142 ; xxxiii. 37-75 (in Sabrinae Corolla, Camb.). 

Matthew Arnold, in his Note-books (ed. Mrs. Wodehouse, Lond., 
1902), quotes Purg. xiv. 93. 

John Wesley Thomas : The Trilogy ; or Dante's Three Visions. 
Inferno, or the Vision of Hell : Translated into English, in the Metre 



110 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1859 — continued. 

and Triple Rhyme of the Original ; with Notes and Illustrations. 

(Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, July 9 ; Saturday Review, Aug. 20 ; Westminster 
Review, Jan. 1861.] 

Bruce Whyte : A Free Translation, in Verse, of the Inferno of 

Dante, with a Preliminary Discourse and Notes. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, July 9 ; Saturday Review, Aug. 20 ; Westminster 
Review, Jan. 1861.] 

Dinah Maria Mulock : Beatrice to Dante ; Dante to Beatrice 
(in Poems by the Author of '' John Halifax, Gentleman ', Lond.). 

A. Manning : Dante (in ch. 13 of TJie Story of Italy, Lond.). 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colour of ' Giotto painting Dante's 
Portrait ' (unfinished replica of drawing of 1852) ; pencil sketch of 
' Salutatio Beatricis in Terra' (V.N., §3, 11. 5-15); pen-and-ink 
sketch of ' Dantis Amor ' {V.N., § 43, 11. 15-17 ; Par. xxxiii. 145) ; 
oil painting of preceding ; oil painting of ' Salutatio Beatricis in 
Terra— in Eden ' (V.N., § 3, 11. 5-15 ; Purg. xxx. 70-3) ; crayon 
drawing of ' Beata Beatrix ' (V.N., § 43, 11. 15-17). 

Henry Holiday : oil painting of ' Meeting of Dante and Beatrice 
as Children in the Garden of Folco Portinari's House. (R.A., No. 649.) 

J. W. Thomas : water-colour of ' The Ancient System of the 
Universe, together with the three Divisions of the Invisible World, 
as adapted thereto by Dante ' (lithographed by W. Monkhouse as 
frontispiece to the artist's translation of the Inferno). 

Vincent Brooks : chromolithograph of ' Dante. Facsimile of 
a Portrait of Dante by Giotto discovered in 1841 ^ in the Bargello 
at Florence, from a tracing by Seymour Kirkup, Esq., made previously 
to the restoration of the fresco, and now in the possession of the 
Rt. Honble Lord Vernon.' (Published by the Arundel Society.) 

c. 1860 

John Payne : translation (verse) of the Commedia. (Not pub- 
lished.) 

Charles James Rowe: translation (verse) of Son. xv {V.N., § 26) 
(set to music by C. Pinsuti, Lond.). 

Dante (in Imperial Dictionary of Universal Biography. Lond., n.d.). 

C. E. Wagstaff : portrait of Dante, after Raphael Morghen 
(engraved as illustration to above). 

D. G. Rossetti: pencil drawing of 'Beata Beatrix ' [V.N., § 43, 
11. 15-17). 

' Error for 1840. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 111 

1860 

H. C. Barlow : The Pope and the Poet (in Morning Post, Jan. 24) ; 
Dante's Prophecy of Piedmont (in same, March 31 ; Nov. 29) ; Dante 
Allighieri and his Love of the Sea (in Athenaeum, June 23) ; The 
Southern Cross as seen by Dante (in same, Sept. 8) ; 'II Veltro di 
Dante ' (in Galignanrs Messenger, Sept. 14) ; The Dante Festival at 
Florence (in Athenaeum, Dec. 15). 

Dante (poem) (in Cornhill Magazine, April). 

Marian Evans (' George Eliot '), in her Journal (Florence, jMay), 
recording visits to Santa Croce, says, ' I used to feel my heart swell 
a little at the sight of the inscription on Dante's tomb — Onorate 
VaUissimo poeta.' 

W. Falconer : Passage in Dante {Purg. xxxiii, 43) (in Notes and 
Queries, Sept. 1). 

Samuel Robinson : translation {terza rima) of Inf. iii (in Transla- 
tions from Dante, Ariosto, Horace, etc. Ashton-under-Lyne, priv. pr.). 

T. L. Peacock : translation (terza rima) of Par. xxxi. 70-2 (in 
Gryll Grange). 

E. B. Browning, in preface to Poems before Congress, says, ' What 
I have ^vritten has simply been written because I love truth and 
justice quand mime — " more than Plato " and Plato's country, more 
than Dante and Dante's country . . . ' ; in The Dance, she speaks 
(st. 9) of ' the holy stone where Dante sate '. 

RusKiN, in vol. V. of Modern Painters, compares the make of 
Turner's mind with that of Dante, affirming that ' Turner's love of 
truth was as stern and patient as Dante's ' (vol. ix, ch. 9, § 9 ; ch. 11, 
§ 26) ; quotes and comments on Dante's description (Inf. xvii. 1 ff.) 
of Geryon (vol. ix, ch. 10, §§ 13-15, 19) ; and in Unto this Last (iii), 
a propos of the love of money, quotes Par. xix. 109-11. 

E. Ortner : medallion of ' Head of Dante '. (R.A., No. 898.) 

George Dunlop Leslie : oil painting of ' Matilda ' (Purg. xxviii). 
(R.A., No. 578.) 

H. S. Leifchild : marble group of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (Inf. 
v. 106). (R.A., No. 952.) 

c. 1861 

D. G. Rossetti : pencil (3) and black chalk (1) studies for ' Beata 
Beatrix ' (V.N., § 43, 11. 15-17). (In Birmingham Art Gallery.) 

1861 
H. C. Barlow : Proposed Dante Festival at Florence (in Morning 
Post, Jan. 8) ; Garibaldi the ' Veltro ' of Dante (in Athenaeum, 
Feb. 16) ; Fraticelli's edition of the Divine Comedy (in same, April 6) ; 



112 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1861 — continued. 
The Murder of Prince Henry of England at Viterbo {Inf. xii. 119-20) 
(in sattie. May 4) ; Temple at Florence in honour of Dante (in same, 
May 11) ; Fraticelli's ' Vita di Dante ' (in same, July 6) ; Codici of 
the Divina Commedia (in same, Aug. 13) ; Pope Clement V and the 
Inferno of Dante (in same, Dec. 7). 

Samuel Harvey Reynolds : Dante and his English Translators 
(in Westminster Review, Jan.). 

Dante : his Works and Wanderings (in Eraser's Magazine, March). 

William Michael Rossetti : Dante's Paradise (in Athetmeum, 
March 16). 

C. B. Cayley : Fraticelli's edition of Dante's Opere Minori (in 
Saturday Review, Aug.). 

T. Keightley : Dante's Commedia (in Notes and Queries, Sept, 14 ; 
Oct. 26). 

Hell of Dante Alighieri (illustrated by Dore) (in Athenaeum, 
Sept. 21). 

Matthew Arnold : translation (prose) of Inf. xvi. 61-3 (in 
On Translating Homer, Lect. ii). 

D. G. Rossetti : translation of the Vita Nuova (' The New Life '), 

and sixteen poems from Dante's Canzoniere (in Part ii, ' Dante and 

his Circle,' of The Early Italian Poets. Lond.). 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Feb. 22, 1862; Examiner, March 1, 8, 1862; 
Frasefs Magazine, May 1862 ; National Review, July 1862 ; Christian 
Examiner, Nov. 1862.] 

W. M. Rossetti : translation (blank verse) of Inf. x. 55-63, 67-72, 
109-14 (in D. G. Rossetti's Early Italian Poets, pp. 199-200). 

W. F. D'Almaine : oil painting of ' Beatrice '. (Brit. Inst., No. 602.) 

F. Leighton : oil paintijig of ' Paolo e Francesca ' {Inf. v. 132-8). 
(R.A., No. 276.) 

A. Baccani : oil painting of ' Dante at Florence '. (R.A., No. 502.) 

D. G. Rossetti : water-colour of ' Paolo and Francesca ' {Inf. v. 
127-36). 

1862 

Lord Vernon : L'Inferno di Dante Alighieri, Disposto in ordine 
grammaticale, e corredato di brevi Dichiarazioni. Vol. ii. Documenti. 
(Londra.) 

J. W. Thomas : The Trilogy ; or Dante's Three Visions. Part ii. 
Purgatorio, or The Vision of Purgatory. Translated into English, 
in the Metre and Triple Rhyme of the Original ; with Notes and 
Illustrations. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Sept. 20.] 



IX LITERATURE AND ART 113 

W. P. WiLKiE : Dante's Divina Commedia : The Inferno. Trans- 
lated (in irregular verse). (Edin.) 

[Reviewed in Spectator, Jan. 31, 1863 ; Athenaeum, April 4, 1868. Second 
edition in 1866.] 

Mrs. C. H. Ramsay : Dante's Divina Commedia. Translated into 
English, in the Metre and Triple Rhyme of the Original. With Notes. 
Inferno : Purgatorio. (Lond., 2 vols.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, April 4, 1863 ; Saturday Review, Nov. 14, 1863.] 

Theodoee Martin : The Vita Nuova of Dante. Translated, with 
an Introduction and Notes. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Feb. 8 ; Examiner, March 1,8; Comhill Magazine, 
March ; Fraser's Magazine, May ; Saturday Revieiv, Oct. 25 ; Christian 
Examiner, Nov. Second edition in 1864 ; tliUd in 1871.] 

H. C. Barlow : The Young King, and Bertrand de Born (Inf. 
xxviii. 135) (Lond.) ; ' II Conte Ugolino e I'Arcivescovo Ruggieri ' 
{Inf. xxxiii) — a Sketch from the Pisan Chronicles (Lond.) ; ' II Gran 
Rifiuto,' What it was. Who made it, and How fatal to Dante AUi- 
ghieri. A Dissertation on Inf. iii. 58-63 (Lond.) ; A New Page in the 
History of Dante (in Athenaeum, April 12) ; Witte's edition of the 
Divina Commedia (in Parthenon, Maj' 24) ; Dante and his Works at 
Oxford (in same, July 26) ; Codici of the Divina Commedia in the 
Cambridge University Library (in same, Nov. 15) ; The Geographical 
Accuracy of Dante (in Athenaeum, Dec. 27). 

L. G. Ware : New Translations of the Vita Nuova (in Christian 
Examiner, Nov.). 

The Vita Nuova of Dante (in Comhill Magazine, March ; Fraser's 
Magazine, May). 

Sundry translations from Dante's works in ' The Growth of the 
Early Italian Poetry ' (in National Review. July). 

Hugh Bent : translation (terza rima) of the Inferno (priv. pr. ; see 
Notes and Queries, Nov. 10, 1877). 

Matthew Arnold, in On Translating Homer : Last Words, quotes 
and translates (in prose) Purg. xxiii. 124-6, 127-9 ; and Inf. xxxiii. 
49-50 ; as examples of Dante's grand style. 

Robert Browning : translation of Conv. ii. 9, 11. 132-6 (written 
in his wife's Testament) (see under 1876). 

Sir William Fettes Douglas : oil paintuig of ' Dante arranging 
his Friends in Inferno '. (R.S.A., No. 318.) 

D. G. Rossetti : water-colour of ' Paolo and Franceses ' {Inf. ■ 
V. 74-5, 112-14, 127-36) (replica of triptych of 1855). 

D. G. Rossetti : translation {terza rima) of Inf. v. 112-42 (dated 
' Sept. 1862 ' ; affixed to the above). 

I 



114 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 862 — continued. 

Anon. : Portrait of Dante after the fresco of Giotto (from drawing 
by Kirkup) (engraved as frontispiece to T. Martin's translation of 
the Vita Nuova). 

Edward John Poynter : oil painting of ' Heaven's Messenger ' 
{Inf. ix. 79-105). (R.A., No. 138.) 

John Hancock : marble bust of ' Beatrice ' {Purg. xxx. 78). 
(R.A., No. 1054.) 

Baron Henry De Triqueti : bronze group of ' Dante and Virgil '. 
<R.A., No. 1077.) 

1862-3 

Marian Evans (' Gegrge Eliot '), in Romola, among other refer- 
ences to Dante, quotes or paraphrases (ch. 13), Purg. xxi. 37-8 ; 
(ch. 39), Par. xv. 112-13 ; (ch. 45), Inf. xx. 7-15 ; iv. 20-1. 

1863 

Mrs. C. H. Ramsay : Dante's Divina Commedia. Translated into 

English, in the Metre and Triple Rhyme of the Original. With Notes. 

Paradiso. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Spectator, Jan. 2, 1864 ; Athenaeum, March 5, 1864 ; Black- 
wood's Magazine, June 1867.] 

E. J. S. Maitland : Pia de' Tolomei {Purg. v. 133-6) (in Poems, 
Lond.). 

Dante (in Monthly Packet, Jan. -June ; Aug. -Sept. ; Dec). 

Matthew Arnold : translation (prose) of Purg. xxx. 121-45 (in 
' Dante and Beatrice ', in Fraser's Magazine, May). 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letter to E. B. Cowell (Aug. 5), says that 
when he looks into Homer, Dante, and Virgil, the Orientals ' look 
silly ', and that Dante, whom he took with him on a saiUng trip, 
' atones with the Sea ; as you know does the Odyssey — these are the 
Men I ' ; in letter to George Crabbe (Aug. 16), he says, ' nothing but 
the Eyes of that unseen Madonna [at Dresden] (like Beatrice's in 
Dante) ' will take him abroad again. 

Dante (in Eclectic Review, Oct.). 

D. G. Rossetti : oil painting of ' Beata Beatrix ' {V.N., § 43, 
Jl. 15-17) (in Tate Gallery). 

William Brodie : marble bust of ' Dante '. (R.S.A., No. 403.) 

c. 1864 
D. G. Rossetti : pencil studies (5) for figures in ' The Boat of 
Love ' {Son. xxxii) (in Birmingham Art Gallery). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 116 

1864 

James Bryce : analysis of the De Monorchia (in ch. 15 of The 
Holy Roman Empire, Lond.). 

H. C. Barlow : Critical, Historical, and Philosophical Contribu- 
tions to the Study of the Divina Commedia (Lond.) ; The Dante 
Festival (in Athenaeum, Feb. 13) ; Dante at Verona (in same, March 19) ; 
Dante and his Commentators (in Home and Foreign Review, Oct.) ; 
The Influence of Beatrice (in Athenaeum, Dec. 24). 

Dante (in Monthly Packet, Feb., May). 

Leighton's ' Dante in Exile ' (in Athenaeum, Feb. 20). 

Notes on Dante (in Dublin University Magazine, May). 

J. M. H. : Dante's Beatrice (in Athenaeum, Nov. 26). 

D. G. RossETTi : water-colour of ' II Saluto di Beatrice : Meeting 
of Dante and Beatrice in Florence and in Paradise' {V.N., § 3, 11. 5-15 ; 
Purg. XXX. 70-3) (replica of oil of 1859) ; ' Dante meeting Beatrice 
in Paradise ' (Purg. xxx. 70-3) (replica of drawing of 1852) ; and 
' Dante ' ; pencil drawing of ' The Boat of Love ' (Son. xxxii) (in 
Birmingham Art Gallery). 

F. Leighton : oil painting of ' Dante in Exile '. (R.A., No. 194.) 

1865 

Lord Vernon : L'lnferno di Dante Alighieri, Disposto in ordine 
grammaticale, e corredato di brevi Dichiarazioni. Vol. iii. Album. 
(Londra.) 

John Dayman : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. Trans- 
lated in Terza Rima. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Feb. 3, 1866 ; Blackwood's Magazine, June 1867.] 

W. M. RossETTi : The Comedy of Dante Allighieri. Part I : The 

Hell. Translated into Blank Verse. With Introductions and Notes. 

(Lond.) 

[No more was published. Reviewed in Examiner, March 4, June 10 ; 
Athenaeum, April 1 ; Spectator, May 6.] 

James Ford : The Inferno of Dante. Translated in the Metre of 

the Original. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Examiner, April 15, June 10 ; Spectator, May 6 ; Athenaeum, 
Oct. 28.] 

Tennyson : To Dante — Written at the Request of the Florentines 
(poem). 

W. FuLFORD : Dante to Beatrice (in Lancelot, with Sonnets and 
other Poems. Lond.). 

M. MiGNATY : An Historical Sketch of the Life and Times of Dante. 
(Florence.) 

I2 



116 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 865 — continued. 

Samuel Neil : Dante (in Epoch Men, and the Results of their Lives. 
Edin.). 

RusKiN, in Sesame and Lilies, contrasts (Lect. i, § 24) the interpre- 
tations by Milton and Dante of the power of the keys {Purg. ix. 
117-29) ; and (Lect. iii, § 110) emphasizes the difference in the 
fundamental conceptions of the Commedia and Paradise Lost. 

George Meredith, in Rhoda Fleming, quotes (ch. 11) Purg. ii. 
114, by way of contrast to ' the nasty German '. 

Dante (in Monthly Packet, Jan., April, June, Sept., Nov.). 

C. B. Cayley : Hercules in Dante's Divine Comedy (in Notes and 
Queries, April 1 ; May 6). 

W. M. RossETTi : Dante and his Translators (in Athenaeum, 
April 8, 15). 

W. F. P. : Dante — ^Hercules (in Notes and Queries, April 15). 

J. LocKHART : Dante Alighieri, the Festal Day, May 1865 (poem). 
(Firenze.) 

A. F. F. and T. E. F. : The Dante Festival (in Monthly Packet, 
May). 

Dante (in Leisure Hour, May 6). 

The Dante Celebration (in Daily Telegraph, May 17). 

The Dante Festival (in The Times, May 19). 

The Dante Festival (in Athenaeum, May 27). 

H. W. T. : Dante and Heraldry (in Notes and Queries, June 10). 

R. B. MicHELL : Dantis Exsilium. Carmen Latinum in Theatre 
Sheldoniano recitatum die Junii xxi. mdccclxv. (Oxon.) 

H. C. Barlow : Supplement to Critical, Historical, and Philo- 
sophical Contributions to the Study of the Divina Commedia (Lond.) ; 
The Remains of Dante (in Athenaeum, July 8 ; Sept. 9) ; Botta's 
' Dante as Philosopher, Patriot, and Poet ' (in same, Oct. 28). 

Dante (in Cornhill Magazine, Aug.). 

The Dante Commemoration (in London Quarterly Review, Oct.). 

Seymour Kirkup, in letter from Florence to Swinburne (Nov. 30), 
announces that he has been decorated by the King of Italy, pre- 
sumably in reward for his services in recovering the Giotto portrait of 
Dante (of which he gives the history) twenty-five years before, and 
that he believes this to be due to Dante himself, whose acquaintance 
he claims to have made (printed in London Mercury, Dec. 1920). 

Dore's ' Inferno ' (in Spectator, Dec. 9). 

E. W. J. HoPLEY : oil painting of ' The Liberation of Rachel ' 
(Latin motto from Dante). (Brit. Inst., No. 271.) 

[Subject doubtful — the motto not being transcribed in Catalogue] 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 117 

c. 1866 

D. G. RossETTi : pen-and-ink sketch of ' Dantis Amor ' {V.N., 
§ 39, 11. 1-2 ; Par. xxxiii. 145) ; oil painting of preceding ; water- 
colour of ' Beatrice '. 

1866 

J. W. Thomas : The Trilogy ; or Dante's Three Visions. Part iii. 
Paradiso, or the Vision of Paradise. Translated into English Verse, 
in the Metre and Triple Rhyme of the Original. (Lond.) 

Frances A. Kemble : On Ary Scheffer's Picture of ' Paolo and 
Francesca ' (in Poems, Lond.). 

George Meredith, in Vittoria, a propos of Vittoria's return to 
Milan, refers (ch. 35) to ' Dante's profoundly human line ' {Inf. v, 
121-3). 

T. S. : Dante and Miltop (in St. James's Magazine, Jan.). 

H. C. Barlow : The Sixth Centenary Festivals of Dante Allighieri in 
Florence and at Ravenna. By a Representative (Lond.); The Feast 
of Codici at Florence in honour of Dante (in Athenaeum, Feb. 10). 

C. R. Weld : The Rediscovery of Dante's Remains at Ravenna 
(in Cornhill Magazine, June). 

H. Harris : Dante (Purg. vi. 118) (in Notes and Queries, July 7) ; 
C. G. Prowett : same (in same, July 21) ; W. W. Skeat : same (in 
same, Aug. 25). 

' CoELO Ictus ' : The Divina Commedia (in St. James's Magazine, 
Aug.). 

W. R. Alger : The Character of Dante (in Christian Examiner, 
vol. 81). 

J. W. Thomas : lithograph of ' Dante and Beatrice ', after Ary 
Scheffer (frontispiece to the artist's translation of the Paradiso). 

1866-7 

D. G. RossETTi : crayon of ' Ricorditi di me che son La Pia' 
{Purg. v. 138-6). 

1867 

Matthew Arnold, in Heine's Grave, writes of a ' tomb On Ravenna 
sands, in the shade Of Ravenna pines, for a high Austere Dante '. 

David Johnston : A Translation of Dante's Inferno, and Purga- 
torio (blank verse). (Bath, 2 vols.) 

W. L. R. Gates : Dante (in Dictionary of General Biography, Lond.). 

H. Welcker and J. B. Davis : The Skull of Dante (in Anthro- 
pological Remexv, Jan.). 

M. H. R. : Dante Query {Inf. xiv. 38-9) (in Notes and Queries, 
Jan. 19) ; C. T. Ramage : same (in same, April 27). 



118 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 867 — continued. 

H. C. Barlow : The Codici of the Divina Commedia at Holkham 
(in Athenaeuvi, March 23) ; Longfellow's ' Translation of the Divina 
Commedia'' (in same. May 18; June 29; Aug. 10); 'Le cinque 
spade ' {Par. xvi. 72) (in same, July 20). 

Dante in English terza rima (in Blackwood's Magazine, June). 

A. M. Bell: Dante Poeta apud Inferos. Gaisford (Greek verse) 
Prize — recited in the Theatre, Oxford, June 26, 1867. (Oxford.) 

Christina Rossetti : Dante an EngUsh Classic (in Churchman's 
Shilling Magazine, Sept.). 

C. B. Cayley : Dante's ' Lonza ' (in Notes and Queries, Nov. 23) ; 
M. H. R. : same (in same, Dec. 21). 

C. R. Weld : The Rediscovery of Dante's Remains at Ravenna 
(in ch. 22 of Florence, the new Capital of Italy, Lond. — amplification 
of article in Cornhill Magazine, June, 1866). 

A. C. Swinburne, in A Song of Italy, says, ' Halls that saw Dante 
speaking, chapels fair As the outer hills and air, Praise him who feeds 
the fire that Dante fed.' 

Albert Bruce Joy : marble bust of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 1156.) 

c. 1868 

D. G. Rossetti : crayon (2) and black chalk (2) studies for ' La 
Pia' {Purg. V. 133-6); pencil (1) and crayon (3) studies for ' Dante's 
Dream ' {V.N., § 23, 11. 33-68). 

1868 
David Johnston : A Translation of Dante's Paradiso (blank verse) 
(Bath.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, July 10, 1869.] 
A. C. Swinburne introduces La Pia, with paraphrase of Purg. 
v. 133-6, in Siena. (Lond., priv. pr.) 

Matthew Arnold, in his Note-books (ed. Mrs. Wodehouse, Lond., 
1902), quotes Inf. xxiv. 46. 

E. A. Beck : Dante in Exile (in A Complete Collection of the English 
Poems which have obtained the Chancellor's Gold Medal in the University 
of Cambridge, Lond. ii. 68-74). 

John G. Harding : translation (blank verse) of In/, i; iii. 1-120 ; 
V. 116-42 ; xxxiv. 127-39 (in Flosculi Literarum ; or. Gems from the 
Poetry of all Time, Lond.). 

J. F. S. : Dante Alighieri, the Poet of the Middle Ages (in The Free 
Churchman and Christian Spectator). 

H. C. Barlow : Parsons's ' Translation of the Inferno ' (in Athen- 
aeum, Feb. 22) ; Dante's House (in same, Feb. 22 ; April 4) ; the 
Matilda of Dante (in same, Aug. 8). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 119 

A. C. Swinburne, in letter to Kirkup (March 28), speaks of the 
weather in England as ' damp snow, rain, hail, and all that Dante 
found in the nethermost hell ' (printed in London Mercury, Dec. 
1920). 

T. L. : The Divine Comedy (in London and Comity Review, March). 

Dante (in British Quarterly Review, April). 

G. ToscANi : Dante's Inferno (in Notes and Queries, June 27). 

Sir J. W. F. Herschel : translation {terza rima) of Inf. i (in 
Cornhill Magazine, July). 

F. W. W. TopHAM : oil painting of ' La Vita Nuova '. (R.A., 
No. 310.) 

1869 

J. G. Waller : On a supposed Portrait of Dante at Verona (in 
Archaeological Journal, civ.). 

H. Kendall : Dante and Virgil (sonnet) (in Leaves from Australian 
Forests, Melbourne). 

A. C. Swinburne, in Essays and Studies, criticizes the respective 
estimates of Dante by Shelley and Landor (ed. 1875, pp. 187 ff.). 

H. C. Barlow : A Codex of the Divina Commedia in the Hun- 
terian Museum at Glasgow (in Athenaeum, Jan. 9) ; Dante Allighieri 
and the Prime Minister (in same, July 17) ; Additional Codici of 
the Divina Commedia in the British Museum (in same, Aug. 7) ; The 
Study of Dante in Bologna (in same, Dec. 18) ; The Matilda of Dante 
(in Jahrbuch der Deutschen Gesellschafl, ii. 251-9). 

Translation (verse) of Inf. i, iii-iv, viii-x, xii, xiv, xix (in Monthly 
Packet, Jan.-June ; Aug.-Nov.). 

Dore's ' Dante ' (in Spectator, Feb. 6). 

E. H. Plumptre : translation of sundry passages from the 
Commedia (in terza rima), and from the Vita Nuova (in review of 
Longfellow's translation of the Divine Comedy, in Quarterly Review, 
April). 

Perez's ' I Sette Cerchi del Purgatorio di Dante ' (in Dublin 
Review, April). 

W. F. Pollock : Lord Vernon's ' Inferno di Dante ' (in Eraser's 
Magazine, May). 

D. G. RossETTi : crayons of ' La Donna ^e\\& Finestra ' (V.N^ 
§ 36, 11. 1-13) ; ' Beata Beatrix ' {V.N., § 43, 11. 15-17) (replica of 
oil of 1863) ; study for ' Dante's Dream ' {V.N., § 23, 11. 33-68). 

John Lawlor : oil painting of ' Dante in Exile '. (R. A., No. 1247.) 

John Hutchison : marble statue of 'Dante'. (R.A., No. 1290 ; 
R.S.A., 1869, No. 1001 ; 1880, No. 353 ; 1887, No. 322.^ 



120 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1869-75 
Sarah Freeman Clarke : pen-and-ink drawings (19) of ' Places 
of the Exile of Dante ' (executed for Lady Ashburton, now in 
Bodleian ; eight of the drawings, ' redrawn ' by H. Fenn, were 
reproduced in illustration of the artist's ' Notes on the Exile of 
Dante ' in Century Magazine, March-April, 1884). 

1870 

James Ford : The Divina Commedia of Dante. Translated into 

English Verse (terza rima). (Lond.) . 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Jan. 21, 1871 ; Academy, Feb. 15, 1871 ; 
Saturday Review, March 23, 1871 ; Spectator, May 20, 1871.] 

D. G. RossETTi : Dante at Verona ; On the Vita Nuova of Dante; 
Dantis Tenebrae (in Poems, Lond.). 

RusKiN, in Verona, comments (ch. 3, § 9) on Dante's Minos {Inf. 
V. 4-12). 

Translation (verse) of Inf. xxi-xxvii, xxxii-xxxiv (in Monthly 
Packet, Feb.-March ; May-Dec). 

H. C. Barlow : On the Vernon Dante ; Dante at Verona ; Dante 
in the Val Lagarina (Lond.) ; Testi di tre canti della Divina Com- 
media, tratti da codici conservati nel Museo Britannico (Lond.) ; 
The Vernon Dante (in Athenaeum, March 5) ; The ' Dante de' 
Venti ' (in same, June 25) ; Dante Allighieri in the Castle of Lizzana 
(in same, July 23). 

Alice King : Dante (in Argosy, May). 

R. McCuLLY : Swedenborg and Dante (in Intellectual Repository, 
June-Aug. ; Nov.-Dec). 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letter to W. F. Pollock (July 18), says 
that Rossini's ' Barber ' ' will make him live when Meyerbeer, 
Guonod, Mendelssohn, Wagner and Co. lie howling, by the side of 
Browning and Co., in some limbo of Dante's First Act of the 
Comedy '. 

S. KiRKUP, in letter from Florence to Swinburne (Sept. 4), says 
that Landor held Inf. v. 135 to be Dante's finest line, and that he 
himself 'chose it for a subject and painted it — the lovers in the 
whirlwind, dashed about and Ughted by a flash of lightning ' (printed 
in London Mercury, Dec. 1920) ; The Giotto portrait of Dante (in 
Academy, Dec. 15). 

D. G. RossETTi : crayon studies (4) for ' Dante's Dream ' {V.N., 
§ 28, 11. 38-68) ; crayon drawings (2) of ' La Donna della Finestra ' 
lv.N., § 86, 11. 1-18); crayon of ' Beata Beatrix' {V.N., § 48, 
11. 15-17) (replica of oil of 1863). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 121 

1871 
The British Museum acquires by purchase a Cent. XV MS. 
(imperfect) of the Convivio (Add. 28840). 

Maria Francesca Rossetti : A Shadow of Dante, being an Essay 
towards studying Himself, his World, and his Pilgrimage. (Lend.) 
Frances Locock : A Biographical Guide to the Divina Commedia. 
(Lond.) 

Erxest R. Ellaby : The Inferno of Dante Alighieri. Translated 
into English Verse, with Notes. Cantos i-x. (Lond.) 

[Cantos 1-iii, in irregularly rhymed terza rima ; Cantos iv-x, in blank 
verse with occasional rhymes ; second edition, revised, in 1874.] 

G. Barlow : Dante and Beatrice ; ' Tra Beatrice e te e questo 
muro ' {Purg. xxvii. 36) (in Poems and Sonnets, Lond.). 

John Payne : Ad Dantem (sonnet) (in Intaglios, Lond.). 

George Meredith, in Harry Richmond, speaks (ch. 35) of Paolo 
and Francesca {Inf. v.) as 'the two immortal lovers, who floated in 
divine self-oblivion through the bounds of their purgatorial circle '. 

Catalogue of an extensive collection of Danteiana, the property 
of Seymour Kirkup. (Lond.) 

T. A. Trollope : The True Story of Francesca da Rimini (in 
St. Paul's Magazine, Jan.). 

H. B. Cotterill : La Vita Nuova (poem) (in The Eagle, Feb.). 

Translation (verse) of Purg. i, ii, v, vi, viii-x (in Monthly Packet, 
Feb.-April ; June-July ; Oct.-Nov.). 

Catherine M. Phillimore : Dante's Paradise (in St. Paul's 
Magazine, April). 

C. T. Ramage : Sonnet of Dante to Bosone of Gubbio (in Notes 
and Queries, Aug. 5). 

T. M'Grath : Dante — "' Di dolor hostello ' (in Notes and Queries, 
Sept. 16 ; Nov. 25). 

H. C. Barlow : Dante Allighieri (in Lambeth Magazine and St. 
Philip's Chronicle, Oct.). 

Dante Road (in Builder, Nov. 18). 

[The road is between Newington Butts, where Dr. H. C. Barlow resided, 
and Brook Street, S.E.] 

D. G. Rossetti : water-colour of ' Beata Beatrix ' {V.N., § 43, 
11. 15-17) (small rephca of oil of 1863) ; oil painting of ' Dante's 
Dream ' (V.N., § 23, 11.33-68) (in Walker Art Gallery at Liverpool). 

J. B. Carpeaux : sculptured group of ' Ugolino and Family in 
Prison '. (R.A., No. 1232.) 

M. F. Rossetti : drawings of diagrams (4) in illustration of the 
Divina Commedia (lithographed by Vincent Brooks, as illustrations 
to the artist's Shadow of Dante). 



122 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 971— continued. 
H. T. Dunn : drawing of Dante's portrait by Giotto, and of his 
Death-mask (engraved by J. Cooper, as frontispiece to M. F. Rossetti's 
Shadow of Dante). 

c. 1872 
D. G. RossETTi : water-colour study for ' Salutation of Beatrice ' 
{V.N., § 26 : Son. xv). 

1872 

RusKiN, in Fors Clavigera (xviii), translates (in prose) and com- 
ments on the account of the lake of pitch in Malebolge (Inf. xxi. 
7 ff.) ; and (xxiii-iv), explains the arrangement of Dante's Hell ; 
in Eagle's Nest (iv, § 75 ; v, § 79), comments on the episode of Ulysses 
(Inf. xxvi. 107-42) ; in Munera Pulveris (ch. 3, §§ 88-93), discusses 
the punishment for the unworthy use of riches (Inf. vii ; Purg. xix) : 
in Aratra Pentelici (iv, § 129), applies Purg. xii. 67-8 to the Robbia 
bas-reliefs at Pistoja. 

Marian Evans (' George Eliot '), in Middlemarch, quotes (ch. 19), 
Purg. vii. 107-8 ; (ch. 54) Son. xi (V.N., § 21). 

C. A. Kelly : Dante (in Delhi and other Poems, Lond.). 

B. B. Woodward and W. L. R. Gates : Dante (in Encyclopaedia 
of Chronology, Historical and Bibliographical, Lond.). 

Translation (terza rima) of Purg. xii-xiii (in Monthly Packet, 
Jan. ; April). 

H. C. Barlow : Opere Dantesche del Cav. Dott. E. C. Barlow 
(Newington Butts) ; A new Commentary on Dante (in Athenaeum, 
Jan. 20) ; The ' Dante de' Venti ' (in same, March 9) ; Dante Allighieri 
as seen on the Albert Memorial (in same, July 20). 

S. KiRKUP : Dante Monuments at Florence (in Athenaeum, 
March 16). 

F. J. FuRNiVALL : Chaucer and Dante (in Notes and Queries, 
June 15). 

John Addington Symonds : An Introduction to the Study of 
Dante. (Lond., second edition, 1890) ; translation of sonnet on 
Dante by Michael Angelo (in Contemporary Review, Sept.). 

R. Browning, in Fifine at the Fair, introduces (§ 70) reminiscence 
of Inf. xxviii. 131 ; Purg. ii. 67-8. 

Henry Hugh Armstead : marble statue of ' Dante ' (on south 

podium of Albert Memorial in Hyde Park). 

[Dante is seated at the feet of Virgil, and is looking up into the face of 
Homer.] 

D. G. RossETTi : pencil study for the following ; oil painting of 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 123 

' Meeting of Dante and Beatrice in Paradise ' {Purg. xxx. 70-3) ; 
crayon of ' Beata Beatrix' (V.N., § 43, 11. 15-17); oil painting of 
same (replica of oil of 1863) ; oil painting of ' Head of Beatrice '. 

1873 

Edmund Gosse : Sestina (on Inf. v. 127-8 ; Purg. xxvi. 142) (in 
On Viol and Flute, Lond.). 

Translation (verse) of Purg. xix, xxi, xxii, xxiv, xxvii (in Monthly 
Packet, Feb. ; April ; Oct.-Dec). 

H. C. JBarlow : The ' Dante de' Venti ' (in Athenaeum, June 7) ; 
Parsons's ' Purgatory ' (in same, June 14). 

Macaulay's Estimate of Dante (in Gentleman's Magazine, Sept.). 

Mandell Creighton : Dante, His Life, His Writings, i. (in 
Macmillan's Magazine, xxix). 

D. G. RossETTi : crayon study for ' Dante's Dream ' {V.N., § 23, 

11. 33-68). 

c. 1874 
D. G. RossETTi : grisaille of ' The Boat of Love ' (Son. xxxii) 
(in Birmingham Art Gallery). 

1874 

RusKiN, in Val d'Arno, quotes (ii, § 54) Par. xv. 112 ft., as express- 
ing Dante's sense that the luxury of the age was sapping its faith. 

H. B. CoTTERiLL : Selections from the Inferno, with Introduction 
and Notes. (Oxford.) 

C. ToMLiNSON : The Sonnet, its Origin, Structure, and Place in 
Poetry, with Original Translations from the Sonnets of Dante and 
Petrarch. (Lond.) 

Alice King : Dante (in A Cluster of Lives, Lond.). 

J. A. PiCTON : Dante and Tennyson (in Notes and Queries, 
Feb. 21). 

H. C. Barlow : Dante at Naples (in Athenaeum, April 4) ; 'II 
gran Rifiuto ' (Inf. iii. 60) (in Academy, Aug. 16). 

H. W. L. : Dante and his Times (in Catholic Progress, May) ; 
Dante and his Pilgrimage (in same, July-Nov.) ; the Scope and 
Spirit of the Divina Commedia (in same, Dec). 

Rossetti's ' Dante and his Circle ' (in London Quarterly Review, 
July). 

Marian Evans (' George Eliot '), in letter to Mad. Bodichon 
(July 17), says, ' I am no longer one of those whom Dante found in 
hell border because they had been sad under the blessed sunlight ' 
(Inf. vii. 121-2). 

R. Atkinson : Dante (in Contemporary Review, Aug.). 



124 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 874 — continued. 

H. F. TozER : D'Ancona's edition of the Vita Nuova (in Academy, 
Sept. 12). 

Alfred Foeman and H. Buxton Forman : The Metre of Dante's 
Comedy discussed and exempHfied (with verse translation of Inf. i, 
iii ; Purg. i ; Par. i) (in Civil Service Review, Oct. 30 ; Nov. 7, 14, 
21, 28 ; Dec. 12, 19). 

[Subsequently privately printed, Lond., 1878.] 

' Erem ' : Dante and his Translators (in Notes and Queries, 
Nov. 7; Dec. 26) ; J. A. Picton: same (in same, Nov. 28); M. H. R. : 
same (in same, Nov. 28). 

'A PuRGATORiAN ' : ThePTophetIiante{mCivilService Review,T)ec.). 

M. Creighton : Dante, His Life, His Writings, ii. (in Macmillan's 
Magazine, xxx). 

Anon. : The Writings of Dante Alighieri (from the Italian of Paolo 
Emiliani-Giudici). 

D. G. RossETTi : Dante and his Circle. (Lond.) 

[A new edition, ' revised and rearranged,' of the Early Italian Poets, 1861.] 

J. J. Jacott : lithographs of ' L'Envie ' and ' La Paresse ', from 
Dante, after A. Yvon. (R.A., Nos. 1058, 1066.) 

D. G. RossETTi : black chalk (1) and crayon (3) studies for ' Dante's 
Dream ' (V.N., § 23, 11. 33-68). 

c. 1875 
William Charteris : translation (irregular verse) of the Divina 
Commedia. 

[Unpublished ; MS. in British Museum.] 
D. G. RossETTi : crayon studies (2) for ' Dante's Dream ' {V.N., 
§ 23, 11. 33-68) ; crayons of ' La Donna della Finestra ' {V.N., § 36, 
11. 1-13) ; ' Madonna Pietra ' {Sest. i-iv). 

1875 

H. C. Barlow : Sei Cento Lezioni della Divina Commedia, tratte 
dair Edizione di Napoli del 1477, Confrontatc colle corrispondenti 
Lezioni delle Prime Quattro Edizioni. (Lond.) 

R. Lothian : Dante and Beatrice : a Romance. (Lond., 2 vols.) 

George Meredith, in Beauchamp's Career, among other references 
to Dante, quotes (ch. 22) Inf. x. 100, from ' the wisest poet, Dante '. 

Anon. : translation (verse) of Son. xxxii, x, xiv, xv, xxii, xlix, 
xxxiv (in Translations and Poems, Lond., priv. pr.). 

H. K. : Dante and his Translators (in Notes and Queries, Jan. 2) ; 
M. H. R. : same (in same, Feb. 6) ; ' Jabez ' : same (in same, 
April 3). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 125 

H. W. L. : Dante and the Empire (in Catholic Progress, Jan.) ; 
Dante and the Popes (in same, April). 

H. C. Barlow : Dante and Michelangelo (in Builder, March 20). 
Anon. : The Early Years of Dante (in Cornhill Magazine, Oct.). 

E. D. A. MoHSHEAD : Dante — an Essay read before the New 

College Essay Society, Nov. 20. (Winchester, priv. pr.) 

[Contains translations (in Spenserian stanzas) of the episodes of ' Francesca" 
(Inf. V. 70-142), ' Ulysses ' (InJ. xxvi. 85-142), and ' Ugolino ' (/«/. xxxiii. 
1-75).] 

Margaret Oliphant : Dante in Exile (in Cornhill Magazine, Dec). 

F. LeVien : Dante and Bunyan (in Churchman'' s Shilling Magazine), 
O. S. T. Drake : Notes on Dante's Beatrice (in Churchman'' s 

Shilling Magazine). 

RusKiN, in Mornings in Florence (iii), comments on Dante's subtle 
sense of the effects of light, and instances Purg. xxvi. 4-8. 

Henry Holiday : water-colour of ' Dante Alighieri ' (studied 
from a cast). (R.A., No. 639.) 

[Reproduced in colour by Hanfstiingel.] 
D. G. RossETTi : crayon of ' Dante awakening from his Dream ' 
{V.N., § 23, 11. 69-125). 

1876 
University College, London, receives the Barlow Dante Library by 
bequest from Dr. Henry Clark Barlow. 

Oxford Dante Society founded (first meeting held on Nov. 24). 
[The Society held its hundredth meeting on Nov. 24, 1909 ; the 132nd 
meeting was held on Nov. 9, 1920.] 

RusKiN, in Ariadne Fiorentinu, gives (vi, §§ 194-5) an account of 
Botticelli's illustration of the Commedia. 

Marian Evans (' George Eliot '), in Daniel Deronda, quotes (ch. 17), 
Inf. V. 121-3 ; (ch. 36), Inf. iv. 112 (adapted) ; (eh. 50), Inf. xxix. 
43^ ; (ch. 55), Inf. vi. 106-8 ; (ch. 64), Purg. iv. 88-90 ; and refers 
(ch. 54), to the story of La Pia {Purg. v. 133-6). 

Anthony Trollope, in Tlie Prime Minister, represents (ch. 30) 
Mrs. Lopez as ' setting herself down to read Dante ', in whom her 
husband (ch. 44) had affected to be interested. 

John Richard Green : The B'lorence of Dante (in Stray Studies 
from England and Italy, Lond.). 

N. Michell : Dante's Beatrice (poem) (in Famous Women and 
Heroes, Lond.). 

Margaret Oliphant : The Makers of Florence : Dante, Giotto, 
Savonarola. (Lond.) 

Charles Tennyson Turner : Dante and Beatrice at Portinari's 
Evening Party (sonnet) (in International Review, Jan.). 



126 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1876 — continued. 
Edwakd Fitzgerald, in letter to C. E. Norton (Feb. 7), relates 
how (c. 1832) he and Tennyson ' were stopping before a shop in 
Regent Street where were two Figures of Dante and Goethe. I 
(I suppose) said, " What is there in old Dante's Face that is missing 
in Goethe's ? " And Tennyson (whose Profile then had certainly 
a remarkable likeness to Dante's) said, " The Divine ".' 

E. Peacock : Dante (in Notes and Queries, Aug. 15). 

J. BoucHiER : Dante's Paradiso (in Notes and Queries, Sept, 9). 

F. NoRGATE : Dante as a Painter (in Notes and Queries, Dec. 30). 
Robert Browning, in letter to a lady who thought herself 

dying, quotes his translation of Conv. ii. 9, 11. 132-6 (see under 1862). 
Frederic Leighton : oil painting of ' Paolo ' {Inf. v). (R.A., 
No. 970.) 

B. CiviLETTi : marble statue of ' The Young Dante ' {Canz. vii. 
1-4). (R.A., No. 1394.) 

Philip Henry Delamotte : drawings of ' Doorway of Dante's 
House ', and ' Portrait of Dante from the fresco by Giotto ' (engraved 
by H. Kirchner as illustrations to Mrs. Oliphant's Makers of Florence). 

1876-7 
D. G. RossETTi : crayon of ' Dante awakening from his Dream ' 
{V.N., § 23, 11. 69-125) ; black chalk of ' Dante telling his Dream ' 
(V.N., § 23, 11. 69 ff.) ; crayon study for ' Salutation of Beatrice ' 
{V.N., § 26 ; Son. xv). 

1877 

The British Museum acquires Coleridge's annotated copy of the 
second edition (1819) of Gary's 'Dante '. 

The Taylorian Library at Oxford acquires a Cent. XV MS. of 

the Paradiso, with the commentary of Buti. 

[This MS., designated Y by Dr. Moore (Textual Criticism of D. C, 
pp. 549-50), was purchased from a dealer at Naples for £30.] 

Oscar Browning : Dante (in vol. vi. of Encyclopaedia Britanniea, 

ninth ed.). 

C. ToMLiNSON : A Vision of Hell — The Inferno of Dante, Trans- 
lated into English Tierce Rhyme ; with an Introductory Essay on 
Dante and his Translators. (Lond.) 

Margaret Oliphant : Dante (with numerous translations in 
terza rima from the Commedia) (in Foreign Classics for English 
Readers, Edin.). 

C. H. E. Carmichael : Dante and the Thirteenth Century (in 
Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature, Jan.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 127 

T. A. Trollope : Homes and Haunts of the Italian Poets — Dante 
(in Belgravia, March). 

Edward Moore : A MS. of Dante in the Canonici Collection in 
the Bodleian (i) (in Athenaeum, April 7). 

Thomas Wade's Translation of the Inferno (in New Quarterly 
Review, April) (see under 1845-6). 

J. BoucHiER : English Translations of Dante (in Notes and Queries, 
Nov. 10) ; ' Jabez ' : same (in same, Nov. 24). 

D. G. Rossetti : oil painting of ' Beata Beatrix ' {V.N., § 43, 
11. 15-17) (unfinished replica, subsequently worked upon by Ford 
Madox Brown, of oil of 1863) (in Birmingham Art Gallery). 

c. 1878 
D. G. Rossetti : crayon study for ' Salutation of Beatrice ' 

{V.N., § 26 ; Son. xv). 

1878 
Barlow Lectureship on Dante at University College, London, 
inaugurated. 

[The Lectureship has been held by C. Tomlinson, 1878-81 ; A. Farinelli, 
1881-6, 1889-92, 1895-8 ; E. Moore, 1886-9, 1892-5, 1898-1909 ; 
A. J. Butler, 1909-10 ; E. G. Gardner, 1910-20.] 

C. Tomlinson : The Literary History of the Divine Comedy. 
(Lond.) 

[Inaugural lecture as Barlow Lecturer, April 25.] 

A. E. Haigh : The Political Theories of Dante (Stanhope Prize 
Essay). (Oxford.) 

A. D. Vandam : Dante and Beatrice (in Amours of Great Men, 
Lond.). 

J. BoucHiER : Dante and Milton (in Notes and Queries, Feb. 16) ; 
Dante's Purgatorio (in same, March 2) ; English Translations of 
Dante (in same, April 20) ; Dante — Nimrod {Inf. xxxi. .67) (in same 
June 15 ; Aug. 3) ; Portraits of Cromwell and Dante (in same, 
June 22) ; Goethe and Johnson on Dante (in same, July 6) ; Dante 
and the word lucciola (in same, Aug. 24) ; Dante and Shakespeare 
(in same, Oct. 19). 

M. H. R. : Dante's Purgatorio (iii. 120) (in Notes and Queries, 
March 30) ; Dante — Nimrod (Inf. xxxi. 67) (in same, June 15) ; 
Dante and the word lucciola (in same, Dec. 21). 

H. Buxton Forman : English Translations of Dante (in Notes 
and Queries, April 20). 

Dante and Goethe (in Church Quarterly Review, July). 

Joseph Knight : Goethe and Johnson on Dante (in Notes and 
Queries, July 13). ► 



128 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1878 — continued. 

Marian Evans (' George Eliot '), in letter to Mrs. Burne-Jones 
(Aug. 26), says, ' Satisfy the thirsty sponge of my affection. If you 
object to my phrase, please to observe that it is Dantesque ' {Purg. 
XX. 3). 

E. Moore : A MS. of Dante in the Canonici Collection in the 
Bodleian (ii) (in Atlienaeum, Aug. 17) ; MSS. of Dante in Spain (in 
same, Aug. 31). 

H. BouRTON : Inferno, canto xxxiii (in Athenaeum, Aug. 24) ; 
A. J. Butler : same (in same). 

E. Hills : Dante and Shakespeare (in Notes and Queries, Aug. 31) ; 
F. J. FuRNiVALL : same (in same, Nov. 16). 

W. M. Rossetti : translation (blank verse) oilnf. xxxiii. 91*-108* 
(six interpolated terzine) (in Athenaeum, Sept. 7). 

John Macallan Swan : oil painting of ' Dante and the Leopard ' 
{Inf. i. 29-35). (R.A., No. 94 ; R.A. Winter Exh., 1911, No. 25.) 

Robert James Gordon : oil painting of Beatrice. (R. A., No. 132.) 

1879 

Frederick John Church : The ' De Monarchia ' of Dante, 
Translated. (Lond.) 

W. T. DoBSON : Dante's Divina Commedia (in The Classic Poets, 
their Lives and their Times, Lond.) 

Warburton Pike : Translations from Dante, Petrarch, Michael 

Angelo, and Vittoria Colonna. (Lond.) 

[Ck)ntains numerous passages from the Commedia (in lerza rima) and 
Canzoniere of Dante (in rhymed verse).] 

Philip Henry Wicksteed : Dante — Six Sermons. (Lond.) 

John Henry Bridges, in Religion and Progress, translates (in 
prose) and applies Par. xxxi. 31-9 (in Essays and Addresses, 1907, 
p. 68). 

' SussExiENSis ' : Dante and the word lucciola (in Notes and 
Queries, Jan. 25) ; W. J. B. Smith : same (in same. May 3). 

C. T. GwYNNE : Dante's Voyage of Ulysses (in Notes and Queries, 
Feb. 22) ; J. Bouchier : same (in same, March 8) ; M. H. R. : same 
(in same. May 3) ; B. D. M. : same (in same. May 3 ; July 19) ; 
E. Tew : same (in same, July 5). 

B. Nicholson : Dante and Shakespeare (in Notes and Queries, 
March 22). 

W. G. Stone : Shakespeare, Cicero, and Dante (in Notes and 
Queries, April 12). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 129 

Mariak Evans (' George Eliot ') in letter to Mrs. Burne-Jones 
(Oct. 18), quotes and applies Inf. xxx. 142. 

E. Moore : Dante's Classification of Sins in the Inferno and 
Purgatorio (read before Oxford Dante Society, May 27 ; printed in 
Studies in Dante, ii. 1899) ; The Interpretation of Paradiso, iv. 67-9 
(in Academy, Nov. 15). 

M. Roberts : Dante and John Bunyan (in Foreign Church 
Chronicle and Review, June 2). 

W. T. Thornton : translation (terza rima) of Inf. v. 70-138 
(' Paolo and Francesca ') (in Spectator, June 7). 

E. M. Clerke : The Age of Dante in the Florentine Chronicles (in 
Dublin Review, Oct.). 

Anon. : translation (verse) of Par. xxxiii. 1-37 (in Irish Monthly, 
Nov.). 

D. G. RosSETTi : pen-and-ink study for following ; oil painting 
of ' La Donna della Finestra ' (V.N., § 36, 11. 1-13 ; Son. xix) ; oil 
painting of ' Beatrice '. 

G. F. Watts : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca '. (Grosv. Gall, 
Summer Exh., No. 73 ; in Watts Gallery at Compton, Surrey.) 

R. BucKNER : ' Francesca ' {Inf. v). (Grosv. Gall. Summer Exh., 
No. 198.) 

J. S. Westmacott : basso-relievo (bronzed plaster) of ' Francesca 
da Rimini ' (Inf. v. 139-40). (R.A., No. 1468.) 

Horace Montford : marble bust of ' Beatrice '. (R. A., No. 1560.) 

c. 1880 

Earl of Carnarvon : translation (verse) of Son. v. (F. A'^., § 9) ; 
Ball. i. 1-14 {V.N., § 12) ; Son. xi {V.N., § 21) (in Essays, Addresses, 
and Translations, Lond., 1891, ii. 391). 

A. J. Butler : translation (blank verse) of Purg. xxvii. 94-108 (in 
A. J. Butler : A Memoir, 1917, p. 108). 

D. G. RossETTi : crayon study for ' Salutation of Beatrice ' 
(V.N., § 26 ; Son. xv) ; pencil study for same (in British Museum). 

1880 

E. Moore acquires by purchase from Rome a Cent. XV MS. of 

the Commedia, and a Cent. XV MS. of the Convivio. 

[After Dr. Moore's death these MSS. passed by his bequest to the Bodleian 
Library (see under 1916).] 

A. J. Butler : The Purgatory of Dante Alighieri. Edited with 
Translation (prose) and Notes. (Lond. ; second ed., 1892.) 

[Reviewed iu Athenaeum, May 8 ; Saturday Review, June 5 ; Spectator, 
July 3.] 

K 



180 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1880 — continued. 

James MacGregor : translation (prose) of the Paradiso (on 
margins of copy of edition of the Commedia, Lond., 1827, in Bodleian). 

Matthew Arnold, in his Introduction to T. H. Ward's English 
Poets, quotes and translates Inf. xxxiii. 39-40 ; ii. 91-3 ; and Par. 
iii. 85, as illustrations of Dante's high poetic quality. 

Matthew Russell : translation (verse) of Par. xxxiii. 1-86 
(' Dante's Prayer to the Blessed Virgin ') (in Madonna : Verses on 
Our Lady and the Saints, Dubl.). 

Anthony Trollope, in The Duke's Children, represents (ch. 1) 
the Duke as having ' studied Dante '. 

J. Hooper : Green Eyes (Purg. xxxi. 116) (in Notes and Queries, 
Jan. 24). 

The Astrology of Dante (in Urania, Feb.-March). 

Petzholdt's ' Bibliographia Dantea ' (in Athenaeum, Sept. 18). 

D. G. Rossetti : oil painting of ' Dante's Dream ' (V.N., § 28, 
11. 83-68) (reduced replica of oil of 1871), with double predella of 
' Dante dreaming ' (§ 23, 11. 1-68), and ' Dante awakening from his 
Dream ' (§ 23, 11. 69-125) ; crayon of ' La Donna della Finestra ' 
{V.N., § 86, 11. 1-13) (replica of crayon of 1870) ; oil painting of 
* Beata Beatrix ' (V.N., § 43, 11. 15-17) (enlarged replica of oil of 
1868). 

Louis Faoan : pen-and-ink drawing of ' Head of Dante, after 
Giotto ' (engraved as illustration to the artist's Life of Panizzi, 

i. 295). 

1880-81 
D. G. Rossetti : oil painting of ' Salutation of Beatrice ' {V.N., 
§ 26 ; Son. xv) (unfinished) ; oil painting of same (reduced replica 
of preceding). 

c. 1881 
D. G. Rossetti : crayon of ' La Pia ' {Purg. v. 133-6). 

1881 

London Dante Society founded. 

[The present (1020) number of members is 151.] 

Warburton Pike : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, 
Inferno, Translated {terza rima), with Notes. (Lond.) 

D. G. Rossetti : translation {terza rima) of Purg. v. 180-6 (' La 
Pia ') (in Poems, Lond.). 

May Probyn : Dante's Wife (sonnet) (in Poems, Lond.). 

W. St. Clair Baddeley : At Dante's Tomb (sonnet) (in Legend 
of the Death of Antar, &c., Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 181 

Matthew Arnold, in preface to Poetry of Byron, Chosen and 
Arranged, mentions Dante and Milton as instances of ' the alliance 
of the poetical genius with the genius for scholarship and philology ' ; 
and quotes Par. iii. 85 as specimen of Dante's style. 

J. M. Ashley : Studies from Dante (in Churchman's Shilling 
Magazine, March-Aug.). 

Patrick Dillon : Dante and his Age (in Irish Monthly, June). 

H. P. LiDDON : Dante and Aquinas (i) (read before Oxford Dante 
Society, June 7 ; printed in Essays and Addresses, Lond., 1892). 

F. Norgate : Inferno, v. 137 (in Notes and Queries, July 9). 

E. Moore : Two Early Commentaries on Dante (in Academy, 
Oct. 8). 

E. H. Plumptre : Two Studies in Dante (with numerous transla- 
tions in terza rima from the Commedia) (in CoMemporary Review, 
Dec). 

D. G. Rossetti : oil paintings of La Donna della Finestra ' {V.N., 
§ 36, 11. 1-13) (unfinished replica of oil of 1879) (in Birmingham Art 
Gallery) ; ' La Pia ' {Purg. v. 133-6). 

G. F. Watts : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca ' {Inf. v. 
76-87). (Grosv. Gall. Winter Exh., No. 51.) 

H. J. Stock : oil painting of ' Dante and Virgil crossing the Styx ' 
(Inf. viii. 1-81). (Grosv. Gall. Winter Exh., No. 85.) 

GuiDo Bach : oil painting of ' Francesca ' {Inf. v.). (Grosv. Gall. 
Winter Exh., No. 157.) 

1882 

In the Catalogue of the Sunderland sale (Blenheim Library), 
among the Dante items (Nos. 3684-3726) are a Cent. XV MS. of 
the Inferno, with the commentary of Guido da Pisa, the first editions 
of the Commedia (Foligno, 1472), the Convivio (1490), and Vita Nuova 
(1576), and more than thirty other editions of the Commedia, including 
eight of Cent. XV, and fifteen of Cent. XVI (see under c. 1697-1700), 

C. B. Pitman : Illustrious Florentines — Dante (in Florence, its 
History, etc., Lond., from French of Yriarte). 

C. L. Shadwell : translation (Marvellian stanzas) of Inf. xxvi. 
90-142 (' Ulysses ') (in Toynbee's In the Footprints of Dante, 1897). 

H. I. Dudley Ryder : translation (verse) of Son. xv, xxiv, xxv, 
xxxiv, xxxii (in The Poets' Purgatory, and other Poems, Original and 
Translated, Dubl.). 

A. C. Swinburne, in Tristram of Lyonesse, among other allusions 
to Dante, introduces reference to Par. i. 64-9. 

C. Tomlinson : The Leading Idea of the Divine Comedy (with 
numerous verse translations) (in Modern Review, Jan.). 

K 2 



182 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1882 — continued. 

J. W. Hales : Dante in England (in Bibliographer, Jan.). 

Douglas Freshfield : The Mountains of Dante (in Alpine 
Journal, Feb.). 

H. F. TozEB : Musurus's ' Translation of the Inferno ' (in Academy, 
Feb. 11); Anon.: same (in Saturday Review, Feb. 11); same (in 
Athenaeum, March 11). 

The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Sunderland sale 
(April 20) a Cent. XV MS. of the Inferno, with the Latin com- 
mentary of Guido da Pisa (MS. 81918). 

Edward Fitzgerald, in letter to W. F. Pollock, discusses the 
merits of Pollock's, Gary's, and Musurus's translations of Dante. 

M. G. Watkins : Dante (sonnet) (in Monthly Packet, June). 

M. H. R. : Portrait of Dante (in Notes and Queries, Dec. 2). 

C. F. Keary : The Earthly Paradise of European Mythology (in- 
cludes Dante) (in Transactions of Royal Society of Literature, N.S. xii). 

Ford Madox Brown : bas-relief of ' The Spiritual Marriage of 
Dante and Beatrice ' (on D. G. Rossetti's tomb at Birchington). 

1883 

W. S. DuGDALE : Dante's Divine Comedy — the Purgatorio. 
A Prose Translation, with Explanatory Notes. (Lond.) 

Frances A. Kemble : To Dante (in Poems, Lond.). 

Matthew Arnold, in his Note-hooks (ed. Mrs. Wodehouse, Lond., 
1902), quotes Inf. ii. 71. 

E. H. Plumptre : translation (terza rima) of Inf. i-iv ; v. 73-142 ; 
xxxiii. 1-75 (in Samples of a New Translation of the Divina Commedia, 
Lond.). 

R. H. Busk : Portrait of Dante (in Notes and Queries, Jan. 6). 

W. E. Gladstone, in letter to G. B. Giuliani (in Standard, Jan. 9), 
says, ' The reading of Dante ... is a vigorous discipline for the heart, 
the intellect, the whole man. In the school of Dante I have learnt 
a great part of that mental provision (however insignificant it be) 
which has served me to make the journey of life up to the term of 
nearly seventy-three years. ... He who labours for Dante labours 
to serve Italy, Christianity, the world.' 

[See further, Morley's Life of Gladstone, i. 202-3.] 

Mr. Gladstone and Dante (in Times, Jan. 16). 

The Malatestas of Rimini (Inf. v, xxvii, xxviii) (in Edinburgh 
Review, April). 

G. : Dante Alighieri, the Poet of mediaeval Christendom (in 
Churchman's Companion, May). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 138 

W. Merckr : The Pia of Dante (Purg. v. 133) (in Academy, 
May 19). 

E. Moore : The Interpolated Terzine in Inferno xxxiii (in Academy, 
June 2). 

Lubin's Commentary on the Divina Commedia (in Saturday Review, 
Oct. 27). 

W. Boyd Carpenter : Dante (read before London Dante Society, 
Nov. 14 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, ii. Lond., 1906). 

H. P. LiDDON : Dante and Aquinas (ii) (read before Oxford Dante 
Society, Nov. 19 ; printed in Essays and Addresses, Lond., 1892). 

Henry Holiday : oil painting of ' Dante and Beatrice ' {V.N., 
§ 10, 11. 9-16) (pigeons by J. T. Nettleship). (Grosv. Gall. Summer 
Exh., No. 165 ; in Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.) 

Harry Furniss : drawing on wood of ' Dante and Beatrice ' 
(burlesque of preceding, in Punch, June 23). 

1884 

J. R. SiBBALD : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri — The 
Inferno ; a Translation {terza rima), with Notes. (Edin.) 

Christina Rossetti : Dante — the Poet illustrated out of the 
Poem (in Century Magazine, Feb.). 

E. D. A. Morshead : translation (Spenserian stanzas) of Purg. 
ii. 55-133 (' Dante and Casella ') (in Oaford Magazine, Feb. 20). 

Sarah F. Clarke : Notes on the Exile of Dante (in Century 
Magazine, March-April). 

W. Mercer : Dante's ' P'onte Branda ' (in Academy, March 22). 

Anon. : translation (verse) of Inf. v (in Oxford Magazine, 
May 7). 

New Views of Shakespeare's Sonnets — the ' Other Poet ' identified 
[with Dante] (i) (in Blackwood's Magazine, June). 

A. Bartoli's ' Vita di Dante ' (in Athenaeum, June 21). 

J. Flint : Dante in England (in Merry England, July). 

E. H. Plumptre : The Purgatorio of Dante : a Study in Auto- 
biography (with numerous translations in terza rima from the 
Commedia) (in Contemporary Review, Sept.). 

Musurus's ' Translation of the Purgatorio ' (in Saturday Review, 
Oct. 4) ; same (in Athenaeum, Dec. 20). 

J. Ady : Francesca da Rimini {Inf. v) (in Magazine of Art, vii). 

C. O. Murray : etching of ' Dante and Beatrice— after Holiday '. 
(R.A., No. 1434.) 

Mrs. Spartali Stillman : oil painting of ' Madonna Pietra degli 
Schrovigni ' {Seat. i. 37-9). (Grosv. Gall. Summer Exh., No. 362.) 



184 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1885 
J. Innes Minchin : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. Trans- 
lated Verse for Verse from the Original into Terza Rima. (Lond.) 

[Originally completed in 1857 ; contains lengthy Introduction, and essay 
on ' The Obligations of Dante to Virgil '. Reviewed in Spectator, Feb. 27, 
1886.] 

George Meredith, in Diana of the Crossways, says (ch. 15), 'poets, 
who spring imagination with a word or phrase, paint lasting pictures. 
The Shakesperian, the Dantesque, are in a line, two at most.' 

A. J. Butler : The Paradise of Dante Alighieri. Edited with 
Translation (prose) and Notes. (Lond. ; second ed., 1891.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, Jan. 9, 1886 ; Academy, Jan. 23, 1886 ; Saturday 
Review, Feb. 6 ; Spectator, Oct. 3.] 

E. H. Brodie : Dante (two sonnets, in Sonnets, Lond.). 

Emily Leith : Dante and Beatrice (in Thoughts and Remembrance, 
Verses, Glasg.). 

E. D. A. Morshead : translation (Spenserian stanzas) of Purg. iii. 
91-145 (' Manfred of Sicily ') (in Oxford Magazine, Feb. 25). 

A. Olivier : Some Gossip about Dante (in The Month, March). 

M. H. R. : Dante Misunderstood (in Notes and Queries, April 11). 

Cardinal Manning, in letter to Father H. S. Bowden (May 28), 
commending his English version of Hettinger's ' Scope and Value of 
the Divina Commedia ', says, ' No uninspired hand has ever written 
thoughts so high, in words so burning and so resplendent, as the last 
stanzas of the Divina Commedia. ... It may be said of Dante, Post 
Dantis Paradisum nihil restat nisi visio Dei.' 

New Views of Shakespeare's Sonnets — the ' Other Poet ' identified 
[with Dante] (ii) (in Blackwood's Magazine, June). 

Dante's English Translators (in Book-Lore, July). 

H. Krebs : The date of Dante's death (in Academy, Aug. 8). 

T. K. Cheyne : Tedaldi's sonnet on the death of Dante (in 
Academy, Aug. 15). 

Charles W. Pittard : oil painting of ' Francesca ' (Inf. v). (R.A., 
No. 42.) 

Walter Crane : water-colour of ' Tableau representing the Art 
of Italy in a triptych — Venice, Florence, and Rome ' (in the Floren- 
tine group, Dante with Beatrice). 

1886 

The British Museum acquires by purchase at the Wodhull sale 
a MS. (imperfect) (Egerton 2629) of Giovanni da Serravalle's Latin 
Commentary on the Commedia (sec under 1781, 1811). 

F. W. Farrar : Dante (in Sermons and Addresses delivered in 
America, Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 135 

C. Kegan Paul : translation (verse) of Son. xv (in Sonnets of 
Europe, Lond.) ; S. Waddington : translation (verse) of Son. xxx 
(in same). 

Arabella Shore : Dante for Beginners. A Sketch of the Divina 
Commedia. With Translations, Biographical and Critical Notices, 
and Illustrations. (Lond.) 

F. K. Harford : translation (blank verse) of Inf. v (specimen of 
projected ' Inferno, closely translated in metre ' ; Lond., priv. pr.). 

E. H. Plumptre : The Commedia and Canzoniere of Dante Ali- 

ghieri. A New Translation (terza rima). with Notes, Essays, and a 

Biographical Introduction. Vol. i. Hell : Purgatory. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Contemporary Review, Dec. ; Saturday Review, Dec. 25 ; 
Academy, Dec. 25 ; Athenaeum, Jan. 15, 1887.] 

Paget Toynbee : Dante and the Lancelot Romance (in Academy, 
Jan. 9, 30 ; Feb. 27) ; Dante and Paris (in same, March 13) ; Siger de 
Brabant and Siger de Courtrai (Par. x. 136-8) (in same. May 8) ; 
Dante and the Lancelot Romance (text and translation) (in Fifth 
Annuul Report of the Cambridge, U.S.A., Dante Society, May 18). 

A. J. Butler : Paradiso, i. 134, 141 (in Academy, Jan. 30). 

Musurus's ' Translation of the Paradiso ' (in Saturday Review, 
Feb. 6) ; same (in Athenaeum, July 31). 

E. Moore : The Wodhull MS. of Dante (in Academy, Feb. 20) ; 
Dante and Oxford (in same, March 6) ; Castelvetro's Commentary on 
the Inferno (in same, July 10). 

New Views of Shakespeare's Sonnets — -the ' Other Poet ' identified 
[with Dante] (iii) (in Blackwood's Magazine, March). 

J. W. Cross : Dante for the General (in Blackwood's Magazine, 
May). 

W. Mercer : The Pia of Dante (Purg. v. 133) (in Academy, June 19). 

Poletto's ' Dizionario Dantesco ' (in Saturday Review, Nov. 20). 

E. H. Plumptre : Dante as an Observer and Traveller (i) (in 
Scottish Churchman, Dec). 

LiNLEY Sambourne : drawing (a propos of Irving as ' Mephis- 
topheles ' in Wills's Faust at the Lyceum) of ' Mephistopheles Move- 
ment taken and — Dante '. (' Mr. Irving must have foreseen that 
an audience would at once exclaim on his first appearance in Faust's 
study : Why, hallo ! What 's Dante doing here ? '. Punch, Jan. 2.) 

W. Frank Calderon : oil painting of ' Dante in the Valley of 
Terrors ' (Inf. i. 31 ff.). (R.A., No. 364.) 

Mrs. Walter Anderson : oil painting of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., 
No. 970.) 

Sir Coutts Lindsay : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca ' 
{Inf. v. 127-36). (Grosv. Gall. Summer Exh., No. 44.) 



186 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 886 — continued. 
Vincent Brooks : chromolithograph of ' Portrait of Dante by 
Giotto ' (after Kirkup) (frontispiece to vol. i. of Plumptre's translation 
of the Commedia). 

1887 
E. H. Plumptre : The Commedia and Canzoniere of Dante 
Alighieri . . . Vol. ii. Paradise : Canzoniere. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Westminster Review, exxix ; Athenaeum, Jan. 14, 1888 ; 
Academy, Jan. 14, 1888 ; Saturday Review, Jan. 21, 1888 ; Spectator, 
March 17, 1888 ; London Quarterly Review, April 1888.] 

J. P. Lacaita : Benevenuti de Rambaldis de Imola Comentum 
super Dantis Aldigherij Comoediam : nunc primum integre in lucem 
editum, sumptibus Guilielmi Warren Vernon. (Florent., 5 vols.) 

E. Moore : Time-References in the Divina Commedia. (Lond.) 
[Italian translation, Firenze, 1900.] 

Frederick K. H. Haselfoot : The Divina Commedia of Dante 

Alighieri. Translated Line for Line in the Terza Rima of the Original. 

With Notes. (Lond., second ed., 1900.) 

[Reviewed in Saturday Review, May 7 ; Spectator, May 21 ; Academy, 
June 2S ; Athenaeum, July 9.] 

H. S. Bowden : Dante's Divina Commedia, its Scope and Value, 
from the German of F. Hettinger. (Lond. ; second ed., 1894.) 

British Museum Catalogue of Printed Books : Dante Alighieri. 
(58 coll.). (Lond.) 

Elizabeth P. Sayer : II Convito. The Banquet of Dante Ali- 
ghieri, Translated. With Introduction by H. Morley. (Lond.) 
[The first published English translation of the Convixrio.] 

Rose E. Selfe : How Dante climbed the Mountain ; Sunday 
Readings with the Children from the Purgatorio. (Lond.) 

E. R. Chapman : The Meeting of Dante and Beatrice in the Earthly 
Paradise (verse paraphrase of Purg. xxx-xxxi) (in The New Purga- 
tory, etc., Lond.). 

H. T. FiNCK : Dante and Shakespeare (in vol. i. of Romantic Love 
and Personal Beauty, Lond.). 

F. K. Harford : translation (blank verse) of Purg. xi. 1-24. 
(Lond., priv. pr.) 

P. H. Wicksteed : Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante. 

First Part. Univ. Ext. Lectures. (Lond.) 

[This course was the first of a long series of lectures on Dante delivered by 
the lecturer in various centres in England during thirty years (1887-1917).] 

E. H. Plumptre : Dante as an Observer and Traveller (ii) (in 
Scottish Churchman, Jan.). 

F. T. Palgrave : Dean Plumptre's ' Dante ' (in Academy, Jan. 28). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 137 

H, I. Dudley Ryder : Revelations of the Afterwards (Dante's 
Vision in relation to earlier Visions) (in Nineteenth Century, Feb.). 

J. W. Hales : Dante and Romeo and Juliet (in Athenaeum, Feb. 26). 

Dante in Politics, Theology, Literature, and Art (in Saturday 
Review, April 23). 

H. F. Tozer : On some points in the Metre of the Divina Commedia 
(read before Oxford Dante Society, May 28 ; printed as Appendix 
to E. Moore's Contributions to the Textual Criticism of the Divina 
Commedia, 1889). 

A. HioGiNS : The Botticelli Dante (in Academy, June 18). 

The Latin Commentary of Benvenuto da Imola on the Divina 
Commedia (in Saturday Review, June 25). 

The Dante Chair at Rome (in Journal of Education, Sept. 1). 

E. Marshall : Dante {Inf. xxviii. 28-33) (in Notes and Queries, 
Sept. 17). 

Paget Toynbee : Paris and Tristan in the Inferno (in Academy, 
Oct. 1) ; Dante, Orosius, and Alexander the Great (in same, Oct. 15). 

J. H. Abrahall : Dante on Alexander and Dionysius (in Academy, 
Oct. 22). 

John Hutchison : bronze statue of ' Dante '. (R.S.A., No. 673.) 

Julia B. Folkard : oil painting of ' Dante's Beatrice '. (R.A., 
No. 774.) 

C. E. Halle : oil painting of ' Buondelmonte and the Donati ' 
{Par. xvi. 140-7). (Grosv. Gall. Summer Exh., No. 31.) 

c. 1888 

F. York Powell : translation (verse) of Son. xxx. (Not pub- 
lished ; written in author's copy of Sayer's translation of Convito.) 

1888 

R. W. Church : Sordello (Browning's and Dante's views compared) 
(in Dante, and other Essays, Lond.). 

W. Davies : Dante Alighieri and his Works. (Warrington.) 

Matthew Arnold, in address on Milton in St. Margaret's Church, 
Westminster, Feb. 13, compares Milton's domestic life with that of 
Dante, and pronounces him to be as admirable as Virgil or Dante 
' in the sure and flawless perfection of his rhythm and diction '. 

W. W. Vernon : Readings in Dante ; Four Cantos of the Purga- 
torio (xxvii-xxx) explained in English. (Florence.) 

Rennell Rodd : Dante's Grave (in The Unknown Madonna and 
other Poems, Lond.). 

Eugene Lee-Hamilton : Four sonnets on subjects taken from 
Dante (in Imaginary Sonnets, Lond.). 



188 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 888 — continued. 
P. H. WiCKSTEED : Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante. 
Second Part. Univ. Ext. Lectures. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : Alessandro in the Inferno (in Academy, Jan. 7) ; 
Dante's Punishment of Simoniacs (in same, Jan. 21) ; Paris and 
Tristan in the Inferno (in same, Feb. 18, June 23) ; Arnaut Daniel, 
Dante, and the terza rima (in same, March 31) ; ' II Re Giovane ' in 
the Inferno (in sa^ne, April 21) ; 'II vecehio Alardo ' in the Inferno 
(in same, Aug. 4, 18) ; The Colour ' Perse ' in Dante and Chaucer (in 
same, Sept. 22) ; ' Cennamella ' (Inf. xxii. 10) (in same, Nov. 24) ; 
' Pozza ' {Inf. vii. 127) (in same, Dec. 29). 

J. D. C. : Coleridge on Cary's ' Dante ' (in Athenaeum, Jan. 7). 
Agresti's ' Dante e S. Anselmo ; Cunizza da Romano ' (Par. ix. 32) 
(in Athenaeum, Jan. 14) ; De Gubernatis' edition of the Paradiso 
(in same) ; same (in Saturday Review, Dec. 29). 

W. M. RosSETTi : La Dame de Malehaut (Par. xvi. 14-15) (in 
Notes and Queries, Jan. 14). 

T. Kerslake : Dean Plumptre on Dante at Wells (in Academy, 
Jan. 28). 

J. BoucHiER : The Study of Dante in England (in Notes and Queries 
Feb. 4, June 2) ; J. Pickford : same (in same, June 2). 

H. P. LiDDON : Dante and the Franciscans (read before Oxford " 
Dante Society, May 19 ; printed in Essays and Addresses, Lond., 
1892). 

Ruth Bindley : Dean Plumptre on Dante (in Congregational 
Review, May). 

Anon. : translation (terza rima) of Inf. iii. 36-51 ; v. 13-24 ; 
Purg. vi. 76-151, and other passages, in review of Plumptre's Dante 
(in London Quarterly Review, April). 

R. Le Gallienne: Comfort of Dante (sonnet) (in Academy, 
April 7). 

F. T. Palgrave : Chaucer and Dante (in ' Chaucer and the Italian 
Renaissance ', in Nineteenth Century, Sept.). 

E. Moore : The Tomb of Dante (in English Historical Review, 
Oct.). 

T. K. Cheyne : Dante and Delitzsch (in Expositor, Oct.). 
J. H. Bridges : Dante's discourse on the nature of love in Purg. 
xvii, with prose translation of 11. 91-139 (in ' Love the Principle ', 
a Lecture to the Positivist Society, Oct. 14, in Essays and Addresses, 
Lond., 1907). 

J. Pickford : Quotation from Dante (in Notes and Queries, 
Dec. 22). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 139 

1889 

E. MooKE : Contributions to the Textual Criticism of the Divina 

Commedia ; including the Complete Collation throughout the Inferno 

of all the MSS. at Oxford and Cambridge. (Camb.) 

[With appendices on ' Dante's References to Classical Authors ' ; ' The 
Vatican Family of MSS.' ; ' The Interpolated Lines in Inf. xxxiii ' ; ' The 
Text of Witte's Berlin Edition ' ; ' The Metre of the Divina Commedia ' 
(by H. F. Tozer).] 

F. YoKK Powell : Syllabus for Home Study of Dante. (Oxford ; 
new ed., 1891.) 

Katharine Hillard : The Banquet {11 Convito) of Dante Ali- 
ghieri. Translated. (Lond.) 

Heloise Rose : Dante, a Dramatic Poem. (Lond.) 

W. W. Vernon : Readings on the Purgatorio of Dante, chiefly 
based on the Commentary of Benvenuto da Imola. With Intro- 
duction by the Dean of St. Paul's (R. W. Church). (Lond., 2 vols. ; 
second ed., 1897 ; third ed., 1907.) 

Caroline Fitzgerald : Beatrice Portinari (in Venetia Victrix, 
and other Poems, Lond.). 

E. Moore : Dante's References to Alexander the Great (in Academy, 
Jan. 26) ; Paget Toynbee : same (in same, Feb. 2) ; J. A. Symonds : 
same (in same, Feb. 9). 

Oscar Browning : The Religion of Dante (in Time, Feb.). 

Paget Toynbee : Fay's ' Concordance of the Divina Commedia ' 
(in Academy, Feb. 23) ; Dante and Arnaut Daniel — a Note on Purg. 
xxvi. 118 (in same, April 13) ; Two References to Dante in Early 
French Literature (in same, June 29). 

Fay's ' Concordance of the Divina Commedia ' (in Athenaeum, 
Feb. 23) ; same (in Literary World, March 2). 

De Gubernatis' edition of the Purgatorio (in Athenaeum, Feb. 23). 

R. Hudson : Quotation from Dante (in Notes and Queries, March 2). 

F. T. Palgrave : Chaucer's ' House of Fame ' [and Dante] (in 
Academy, May 4 ; June 1) ; C. H. Herford : same (in same. May 18, 
June 15). 

H. F. Brown : A Dante Crux (Inf. vii. 1) (in Academy, May 4). 

Whitley Stokes : Folklore in the Divina Commedia (in Academy, 
June 8). 

E. MooRE : Dante and Sicily (in Universal Review, Aug.). 

I. J. Postgate : A Dream of Dante (poem) (in Gentleman's Maga- 
zine, Aug.). 

Tauber's ' Capostipiti dei Manoscritti della Divina Commedia ' 
(in Athenaeum, Aug. 31). 



140 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 889 — continued. 

Oliver Elton : translation of sonnet on Dante by Michelangelo 
(in Academy, Sept. 7). 

Dante (poem) (in MaxyniiUan's Magazine, Nov.). 

J. H. Bridges : Dante's Position in the History of Humanity 
(with prose translations of Par. xv. 99-102, 112-26, 130-3 ; xxv. 1-9 ; 
xviii. 115, 118-29, 130-6) (in Lecture, Nov. 24, in Essays and 
Addresses, Lond., 1907). 

Vincent Brooks : chromolithograph of ' Portrait of Dante by 
Giotto ' (after Kirkup) (frontispiece to vol. i. of W. W. Vernon's 
' Readings on the Purgatorio '). 

1889-90 

Phoebe Anna Traquair : outline drawings (22) in illustration of 
the Divina Commedia (reproduced in Dante Illustrations and Notes, 
Edin., 1890, priv. pr.). 

c. 1890 

Walter Crane : design in colour of figure of Dante (for a mosaic, 
not executed). 

1890 

E. MooRE : Dante and his Early Biographers. (Lond.) 

Phoebe A. Traquair and J. S. Black : Dante Illustrations and 
Notes. (Edin., priv. pr.) 

A. J. Butler : La Commedia di Dante Alighieri. (Lond.) 

Margaret Wakre : Dante as a Prophet (in Studies in European 
History, from the German of Dollinger). 

A. G. Ferrers Howell : Dante's Treatise De Vulgari Eloqueiitia, 
Translated into English, with Explanatory Notes. (Lond.) 

Rose E. Selfe : With Dante in Paradise. (Lond.) 

P. H. Wicksteed : Syllabus of a Summer Course of Lectures on 
Subjects subsidiary to the Study of Dante's Commedia (Sutton) ; 
Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante's Inferno (Sutton) ; 
Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante's Purgatory (Sutton). 

Sir Lewis Morris : To Beatrice, June 1890 (sonnet) (in Songs 
without Notes, Lond., 1897). 

Elizabeth Wordsworth : Gemma Donati (in St. Christopher and 
other Poems, Lond.). 

Rachel H. Busk : The Sixth Centenary of Dante's Beatrice (in 
Academy, Jan. 11 ; in Notes and Queries, Feb. 1, April 12, May 24); 
C. Tomlinson : same (in same, Feb. 15, April 12, May 3) ; A. Hall: 
same (in same, March 22) ; A. J. M. : same (in same, March 22). 

J. BoucHiER : Dante and Shakespeare (in Notes and Queries, 
Jan. 25). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 141 

J. W. Cross : Dante and the New Reformation (in Nineteenth 
Century, Feb.). 

R. H. Busk : translation of Son. xv {V.N., § 26) (in Notes and 
Queries, Feb. 1, April 12) ; Dante and his Early Biographers (in same, 
June 21). 

E. MooEE : An Unknown MS. of Dante in the Bodleian (in 
Academy, March 8). 

T. Watts-Dunton : Beatrice — Sonnet for the Sixth Centenary 
of Beatrice's Death (in Athenaeum, March 29). 

E. Akmstrong : Dante's Political Ideal (in Church Quarterly 
Review, April ; Italian translation, 1899). 

C. ToMLiNSON: The Relations between Dante and Beatrice (in 
Academy, April 12) ; R. H. Busk : same (in same^ April 26). 

E. H. Hamilton : The Beatrice Exhibition at Florence (in Athen- 
aeum, May 10) ; May Pantin : same (in Academy, May 31). 

Edmund Gosse : Beatrice (poem) (in Athenaeum, May 10). 

Samuel Waddington : Beata Beatrix (poem) (in Academy, 
May 10). 

Edward Caird : Dante in his relation to the Theology and Ethics 
of the Middle Ages (in Contemporary Review, June). 

A. C. Swinburne : Beatrice (sonnet) (in Athenaeum, June 7). 

G. W. R. : translation of Son. xv {V.N., § 26) (in Spectator, Aug. 2). 

J. BoucHiER : The Study of Dante in England (in Notes and 
Queries, Aug. 9, Oct. 25) ; C. Tomlinson : same (in same, Nov. 22). 

J. A. Symonds : The Dantesque and Platonic Ideals of Love (in 
Contemporary Review, Sept.). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante's De Vulgari Eloquentia (in Academy, 
Sept. 6) ; Paris and Tristan in the Inferno (in sa^ne, Sept. 18) ; ' II 
semplice Lombardo ' in Purg. xvi (in same, Nov. 1). 

Mary A. Vialls : translation {terza rima) of Inf. xxvi. 94-142 
(' The Last Voyage of Ulysses ') (in Journal of Education, Oct.). 

Sir Theodore Martin : Dante and Beatrice, 1 May 1274 (sonnet) 
(in Blackwood's Magazine, Nov.). 

Service of Praise, illustrative of the Purgatorio of Dante, in St. 
George's Free Church, Edinburgh, Dec. 25. (Book of Words.) 

[The selected passages were Purg. ii. 46-8 ; v. 24 ; viii. 8-18 ; ix. 189-45 ; 
xiii. 49-51 ; xvi. 16-21 ; xx. 133-41 ; xxxi. 98 ; xxvii. 6 ; xxvii. 55 ; 
xxix. 1 ; XXX. 13-19.] 

John Hutchison : marble statue of ' Dante '. (R.S.A., No. 508.) 
Edwin L. Long : oil painting of ' La Pia de' Tolomei ' (Purg. 

V. 180-6). (R.A., No. 26.) 

1891 
Sir Edwin Arnold : Dante and his Verses (in The Secret of Death, 

and other Poems, Lond.). 



142 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1891 — continued. 

Herbert Baynes : Dante and his Ideal. (Lond.) 

Oscar Browning : Dante, his Life and Writings. (Lond.; 

W. R. Macdonnell : The MS. of the Divina Commedia in the 
Library of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. (Bombay. ) 

A. J. MuNBY : Beatrice (sonnet) (in Vestigia Retrorsum, Lond.). 

W. W.- Martin : Paolo and Francesca (in Quatrains, Mystery, and 
other Poems, Lond.). 

E. Moore : Scartazzini's ' Prolegomeni della Divina Commedia ' 
(in Academy, Jan. 3) ; Anon. : same (in Athenaeum, June 20) ; same 
(in Church Quarterly Review, July). 

J. BoucHiER : The Study of Dante in England (in Notes and 
Queries, Jan. 10) ; E. Marshall : same (in same, Feb. 28) ; R. H. 
Busk : same (in same, Feb. 28, May 9) ; C. Tomlinson : same (in 
same, Feb. 28, May 23). 

E. P. Defries : Browning and Dante (in Academy, Jan. 10). 

N. Wedd : Dante (in National Home Reading Union Magazine,^ 
April 1); Dante's Inferno (in same. May 1); Dante (in satne, June 1). 

R. H. Busk: Dante's Skull (in Notes and Queries, April 11); 
C. Tomlinson : same (in same). 

E. Moore : The Beatrice of Dante (in Edinburgh Review, July).* 

G. Carducci: A supposed Dante Discovery {in Athenaeum, JvXy A). 

K. Hillard : The Beatrice of Dante from a Theosophic Point of 
View (in Lucifer, Aug. 15, Sept. 15). 

Rose E. Selfe : Dante and Beatrice (in Monthly Packet, Oct.). 

Dante as a Politician (in Lyceum, Nov.). 

R. F. Jupp : A Death-bed at Ravenna (poem) (in Monthly Packet, 
Dec). 

Norton's ' Translation of the Inferno ' (in Athenaeum, Dec. 19). 

Wilfred Thompson : oil painting of ' Dante and Virgil in the 
Limbo of the Unbaptised ' {Inf. iv. 33 ff.). (R.A., No. 85.) 

Thomas F. Dicksee : oil painting of Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 1007.) 

John Hutchison : marble bust of ' Dante at Verona '. (R.A., 
No. 2092.) 

c. 1892 

Simeon Solomon : water-colour of ' Ritratto di Mona ^ Beatrice 

dipinto per Dante poeta divino per Giotto di Bondone ' ; crayon of 

' Nessun maggior dolore ' {Inf. v. 121) ; pen-and-ink drawing of 

'The first Meeting of Dante and Beatrice' {Purg. xxx. 28-33) 

exhibited at Dante Loan Collection at University Hall, Lond., 1893). 

• Sic. 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 143 

1892 

J. F. Bridge : The Lord's Prayer (Purg. xi. 1-21) — English 
version by E. H. Plumptre, set to music for the Gloucester Musical 
Festival, 1892. The pianoforte accompaniment arranged by W. 
Alcock. (Lend.) 

Mary Hensman : Dante Map. (Lond.) 

A. J. Butler : The Hell of Dante Alighieri. Edited with Trans- 
lation (prose) and Notes. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Saturday Review, March 19 ; Athenaeum, April 16 ; Academy, 
June 4.] 

C. L. Shadwell : The Purgatory of Dante Alighieri {Purgatorio 
i-xxvii) — An Experiment in Literal Verse Translation. With Intro- 
duction by Walter Pater. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Scottish Review, Jan. 1893 ; Athenaeum, .Tan. 21, 1893 ; 
Saturday Review, .Tan. 28, 1893 ; Notes and Queries, Feb. 25, 1893 ; 
Journal of Education, March 1, 1893 ; Academy, March 25, 1893 ; Manchester 
Quarterly, Oct. 1893.] 

J. A. Symonds and Guido Biagi : Dante — Illustrations to the 
Divine Comedy, executed by Stradanus in 1587, and reproduced . . . 
from the Originals in the Laurentian Library at Florence. (Lond.) 

W. J. Knox Little : The Grave of Dante (in Sketches in Sunshine 
and Storm, Lond.). 

R. R. Whitehead : The Vita Nuova of Dante (with Introduction, 
Notes, and Appendix). (Lond., priv. pr.) ; Dante (in Grass of the 
Desert, Lond.). 

Anna Swanwick : Dante (in Poets, the Interpreters of their Age, 
Lond.). 

James Williams : Beatrice (two sonnets) (in Ethandune, and other 
Poems, Lond.). 

Frederic Harrison : Dante (in New Calendar of Great Men, 
Lond.). 

P. H. WicKSTEED : Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante's 
Paradiso. Part i. Cantos i-xiii ; Part ii, Cantos xiv-xxxiii. (Lond.) 

W. E. Gladstone, as recorded in Morley's Life (iii. 488), remarks 
that ' Dante was too optimist to be placed on a level with Shake- 
speare, or even with Homer '. 

The John Rylands Library, Manchester, purchases from Lord 
Spencer the famous ' Althorp Library ', in which were included an 
unrivalled collection of early editions of the Commedia (see under 
Dibdin, 1811, 1815). 

E. MooRE : The Translations of Aristotle used by Dante (in 
Academy, Jan. 2). 



144 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 892 — continued. 

J. B. S. : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Jan. 2, July 9) ; T. P. 
Armstrong : same (in same, April 2) ; E. Brain : same (in same. 
May 28). 

Paget Toynbee : Norton's ' Translation of the Inferno ' (in 
Academy, Feb. 13) ; Dante's References to Alexander the Great in 
India (Inf. xiv. 28-39) (in same, Feb. 20) ; The Art of Illuminating 
at Paris in the time of Dante (in same, March 26) ; Latham's ' Trans- 
lation of Dante's Letters ' (in same, April 2) ; Norton's ' Translation 
of the Purgatorio ' (in same, July 23) ; Did Dante know Hebrew ? 
(in same, Oct. 15) ; Dante's ' Guizzante '. The Mediaeval Port of 
Wissant (in sam£, Dec. 10, 24). 

Latham's ' Translation of Dante's Letters ' (in Athenaeum, 
Feb. 27). 

R. R. Steele : Dante and the Heliotrope (in Academy, April 9). 

E. S. DoDGSON : Spenser and Dante (in Notes and Queries, April 23) ; 
' Palamedes ' : same (in same) ; T. Bayne : same (in same. 
May 28). 

W. E. Gladstone : Did Dante Study in Oxford ? (in Nineteenth 
Century, June). 

Hyde Clarke : Dante (in Notes and Queries, July 30). 

J. G. Alger : Did Dante visit England ? (in Notes and Queries, 
Aug. 6) ; Dante's ' Guizzante ' (in Academy, Dec. 24). 

H. C. Shelley : Dante and the word lucciola (in Notes and Queries, 
Sept. 10). 

F. J. Snell : Studies in Italian Literature — Dante (in Monthly 
Packet, Oct.). 

Cora Langton : Virgil's Heaven (Purg. xxii. 73) (sonnet) (in 
Monthly Packet, Oct.). 

Maignien's ' Traite de I'filoquence Vulgaire ' (in Saturday Review, 
Nov. 19) ; same (in Athenaeum, Dec. 31). 

S. A. Whetmore : Dante {Inf. xxiii. 68) (in Notes and Queries, 
Nov. 19). 

Scartazzini's edition of the Divina Commedia (in Athenaeum, 
Dec. 81). 

Simeon Solomon : crayon of ' Paolo e Francesca da Rimini ' 
(Inf V). 

Albert Goodwin : oil painting of ' The City of Dis ' (Inf. viii-ix). 
(R.A., No. 114.) 

Jessie Macgregor : oil painting of ' In the Childhood of Dante ' 
(V.N., § 2, 11. 38-9). (R.A., No. 905.) 

Louise Jopling : water-colour of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 1258.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 145 

DoMENico Trentacoste : marble bust of ' Pia de' Tolomei ' 
{Purg. V. 132-6). (R.A., No. 1969.) 

Walter Crane : three designs in line from the Commedia — 
(i) ' Dante and the Three Beasts ' {Inf. i. 31-54) ; (ii) ' The Angel in 
the Boat approaching Dante and Virgil on the Shore' (Purg. ii. 22-45) ; 
(iii) ' The Meeting of Dante with Beatrice ' {Purg. xxx. 28-33) (repro- 
duced as illustrations to The Vision of Dante, by Eliz. Harrison, 
Chicago). 

1893 

E. Moore : Dante's Obligations to the De Officiis in regard to the 
Division and Order of Sins in the Inferno (in Twelfth Annual Report 
of the Cambridge, U.S.A., Dante Society). 

G. H. R. Dabbs and E. Righton : Dante — A Dramatic Poem. 

(Lond.) 

[First performed by the Independent Theatre Society at St. George's Hall, 
July 10.] 

J. W. Cross : Impressions of Dante and of the New World. (Edin.) 

John Owen : Dante (in Skeptics of the Renaissance, Lond.). 

A. J. Butler : A Companion to Dante (from the German of 
Scartazzini). (Lond.) 

William Bell Scott : Dante ; Dante and Beatrice ; Dante in 
Exile ; The Inferno of Dante (poems) (in A Poet's Harvest Home, 
Lond.). 

F. J. Snell : Dante (in Primer of Italian Literature, Oxford). 
Sir Edward Sullivan : The Comedy of Dante Alighieri. Ren- 
dered into English (prose). Hell. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Athenaeum, July 1 ; Spectator, Dec. 23 ; Saturday Revieic, 
Jan. 6, 1894 ; Notes and Queries, May 19, 1894 ; Illustrated London News, 
June 8, 1895.] 

N. Perini : La Vita Nuova di Dante Alighieri, with Notes and 
Comments in English. (Lond.) 

Aubrey de Vere : Dante's Beatrice (sonnet) (in Mediaeval 
Records and Sonnets, Lond.). 

James Pickering Jones (' Raimonde Bell ') : translation (verse) 
of Inf. i. 1-27 (in A Little Book of Verse, Lond.). 

W. H. Mallock : A New Francesca (in Verses, Lond.). 

E. Russell Gurney : Dante's Pilgrim's Progress ; with Notes 
on the Way. (Lond.) 

George Musgrave : Dante's Divine Comedy, consisting of the 
Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. A Version in the Nine-line Metre 
of Spenser. The Inferno or Hell. (Lond. ; new ed., 1896.) 

[Reviewed in Weeklij Times, Aug. 11 ; Athenaeum, Oct. 14 ; Saturday 
Review, Jan. 0, 1894; Spectator, Feb. 10, 1894.] 

L 



146 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 893 — continued. 

E. G. Gardner : Dante's Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (in Nature 
Jan. 26). 

Scartazzini's edition of the Divina Commedia (in Saturday Review, 
Jan. 28). 

W. Mercer : The Pia of Dante (Purg. v. 138) (in Academy, 
Feb. 18). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante's use of the name Trinacria for Sicily 
(Par. viii. 67) (in Academy, Feb. 25) ; ' II Ciotto di Gerusalemme ' 
{Par. xix. 127) — the Claim of Charles of Anjou to the title of Jeru- 
salem (in same, April 1) ; The Date of Cacciaguida's Birth — a Note 
on Par. xvi. 34-9 (in same, April 22) ; Hugh Capet in the Divina 
Commedia and the Satyre Menippee (in same, June 24) ; An Erroneous 
Reading in Dante's De Monorchia (ii. 3) (in same, July 8) ; Scartaz- 
zini's edition of the Divina Commedia (in same, July 22) ; Was 
Dante acquainted with Claudian ? (in same, Dec. 2) ; Did Dante 
write ' Re Giovane ' or ' Re Giovanni ' (Inf. xxviii. 135) ? (in same, 
Dec. 30). 

W. Davies : Dante and the ' Mahabarata ' (in Athenaeum, 
March 18). 

Dante Loan Collection, at University Hall Guild, London (April 
10-17). 

Dante Exhibition (in Saturday Review, April 15). 

W. H. HuTTON : Dante and the Apocalypse of Peter (in Guardian, 
June 14). 

Oliver Elton : translation (blank verse) of Inf. vii. 97-130 ; 
Purg. xvii. 40-72 (in ' Two Places in Dante ', in Owen's College Maga- 
zine, Oct.). 

Basil Tempest : translation {terza rima) of Par. xvii. 46-72, 
100-38 (' Cacciaguida's Prophecy of Dante's Banishment ') (in 
The Week, Dec. 15). 

Walter Crane : decorative design for ' The Vision of Dante ' 
{Inf. i. 1-3, 31-54 : Dante and the Lion, the Leopard, and the Wolf 
in the Forest) (worked in embroidery by Mrs. Crane). (Arts and 
Crafts Soc, New Gall. Autumn Exh.) 

Nelia Casella : coloured wax design of ' Ottava Spera ' {Par. 
xxii. 97-xxvii. 75). (R.A., No. 1710.) 

Prince Paul Troubetzkoy : statue of 'Dante'. (R.A., No. 1761.) 

Frederic James Shields : designs illustrating Inf. xiii. 6 ; Purg. 
i. 135 ; Par. xxxi. 1 (for cover of E. Russell Gurney's Dante's Pilgrim's 
Progress) ; and design for ' Superbia', ' Umilta', ' Amore ' (chromo- 
lithographed as frontispiece to the same). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 147 

1894 
E. Moore : Tutte le Opere di Dante Alighieri, nuovamente rivedute 
nel testo. [Con Indice del Nomi Propri e delle Cose Notabili compilaio 
da Paget Toynbee]. (Oxford.) 

[The ' Oxford Dante ' ; seconda ed., 1897 ; terza ed., piu estesamente 
riveduta, 1904.] 

L. E. Baxter (' Leader Scott ') : Piccarda Donati (Par. iii) (in 
Echoes of Old Florence, Lond.). 

E. Lee-Hamilton : On an Illustration in Dore's Dante ; On the 
Fly-leaf of Dante's Vita Nuova (in Sonnets of tlie Wingless Hours, 
Chicago). 

C. ToMLiNSON : Dante, Beatrice, and the Divine Comedy. (Lond.) 

W. W. Vernon : Readings on the Inferno of Dante. . . . With 
Introduction by E. Moore. (Lond., 2 vols. ; second ed., 1906). 

K. McC. Clark : Paolo and Francesca ; Ugolino (in Persephone, 
and other Poems, Lond.). 

Emily L. Baldwin : Lives of Dante, Boccaccio, and Blaise Pascal. 
(Camb., priv. pr.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante 
(Sutton) ; Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante's Inferno 
(Lond.) ; Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Dante's Purgatory 
(Sutton). 

Dora's Dante (in Saturday Review, Jan. 6). 

A. G. F. Howell : The Disputed Reading in Inf. xxviii. 135 (in 
Academy, Jan. 6) ; Dante and Bertran de Born (in same, Feb. 3). 

E. Moore : Dante in Northern Latitudes (in Academy, Jan. 18) ; 
A Variant in the Vita Nuova, § 30, 1. 2 (in same, Dec. 1). 

Wentworth Webster : Dante's ' Young King ' (in Academy, 
Jan. 20). 

A. J. Butler : Dante, his Times and Work (in Monthly Packet, 
Jan. -June). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante's Reference to the ' Libro dell' Aggrega- 
zione delle Stelle ' (Conv. ii. 6), and to Alfraganus (Conv. ii. 14) (in 
Academy, Feb. 10) ; Dante's Interpretation of ' Galilea ' as ' Bian- 
chezza ' {Conv. iv. 22) (in same, April 7) ; Index of Proper Names in 
the Prose Works and Canzoniere of Dante (in Thirteenth Annual 
Report of the Cambridge, U.S.A., Dante Society, May 15) ; ' La 
Seconda Morte' {Inf. i. 117) (in Academy, May 19); Dante's Refer- 
ence to Alexander the Great in India {Inf. xiv. 28-39) (in same, 
July 7) ; Rahab's Place in Dante's Paradise {Par. ix. 116) (in same, 
Sept. 22) ; ' La Mesnie Hellequin ' and ' Alichino ' {Inf. xxi. 118) 
(in same, Oct. 6). 

l2 



148 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 894 — continued. 

Nesta Higginson (' Moira O'Neill ') : The" Power of Dante (in 
Blackwood's Magazine, March). 

E. B. Brown : A Dante Examination Paper (in Journal of Educa- 
tion, March 1). 

J. B. S. : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, March 3). 

Emily Underdown (' Norley Chester ') : Dante's Liberty (sonnet) 
(in Author, April 2). 

C. ToMLiNSON : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, April 7 ; June 
23) ; A Dante Society for London (in Athenaeum, Dec. 8). 

E. Levi's ' Dante di Giorno in Giorno ' (in AtJienaeum, April 21). 
John Vaughan : The Birds of Dante (in Churchman, May). 

C. Kegan Paul : Dante and the Divina Commedia (in The Month, 
May). 

R. Garnett : Dante's ' Seconda Morte ' (in Academy, May 26). 

F. St. John Thackeray : Dante and Tennyson (in Temple Bar, 
July). 

Lionel Johnson : The Hardness of Dante (in Speaker, Aug. 25). 

Emily F. Jourdain : The Symbolism of the Divina Commedia (in 
Eaopository Times, Nov.). 

W. W. Skeat : ' Fortuna Maior ' (in Chaucer and Dante) (in 
Academy, Nov. 3). 

Mervyn Laurence : bust of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 1786.) 

Arthur G. Walker : ivory and ebony statuette of ' Dante as 
a Seer '. 

Anon. : drawings of ' The Death Mask of Dante ' (in profile, and 
full face) (engraved as frontispieces to W. W. Vernon's Readings on 
tlie Inferno). 

1894-5 

Linda Villari : The Two First Centuries of Florentine History ; 
the Republic and Parties at the Time of Dante (from the Italian of 
Pasquale Villari). (Lond., 2 vols.) 

1895 
Taylorian Lectureship on Dante instituted at Oxford. 

[Created for Pr. Edward Moore, and held by him until 1908.] 
Trinity College, Cambridge, receives by gift from Lady Pollock the 
Dante collection of the late Sir W. F. Pollock. 

La Vita Nuova di Dante Alighieri Fiorentino. (Printed by 
C. H. St. John Hornby at the Ashendene Press.) 

R. Le Gallienne : Paolo and Francesca ; Comfort of Dante (in 
English Poems, Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 149 

Robert Bridges, in Keats : A Critical Essay (Lond., priv. pr.), 
traces the influence of Dante in Keats's revision of Hyperion. 

C. S. BoswELL : The Vita Nuova and its Author ; being the Vita 
Nuova of Dante Alighieri, Literally Translated, with Notes, and an 
Introduction. (Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Spectator, June 1 ; Morning Post, June 10 ; Athenaeum, 
Aug. 3.] 

A. J. Butler : Dante, his Times and Work. (Lond.) 

R. Garnett : To Dante (sonnet) (in Poems, Lond.). 

H. Oelsner : The Influence of Dante on Modern Thought. 
(Lond.) 

Emily Underdown (' Norley Chester ') : Dante Vignettes (son- 
nets). (Lond.) 

A. C. Calmour : Dante, an Historical Romance, in Four Acts. 
(Lond., priv. pr.) 

L. ScHRAM : Theosophical Analogies in the Divina Commedia. 
(Lond.) 

Maurice Hewlett : Dante ; Beatrice ; Dante and Beatrice (in 
.1 Masque of Dead Florentines, Lond.). 

M. R. James, in A Descriptive Catalogue of the MSS. in tlie Library 
of Eton College, registers (pp. 47, 49) two Cent. XV MSS. of the 
Commedia. 

[These were the two MSS. bequeathed by Sir Henry Wotton in 10.39, and 
registered by Bernard in 1697.] 

R. Urquhart : The Inferno of Dante. Translated in the terza 
rima of the Original. (Lond., priv. pr.) 

P. H. Wicksteed : Syllabus of a Course of twelve Lectures on 
Dante. (Oxford) ; Syllabus of a Course of ten Lectures on Dante's 
Paradise. (Lond.) 

Louise de la Ramee (' Ouida ') : Paolo and Francesca (in 
Cosmopolitan, Jan.). 

J. B. S. : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Jan. 19 ; May 25) : 
C. A. Ward : same (in same, March 16). 

' Palamedes ' : A Reminiscence of Dante in Basque Literature 
(in ISJotes and Queries, Feb. 9). 

Paget Toynbee : ' Li Tre Tarquinii ' (Conv. iv. 5) (in Academy, 
Feb. 23) ; A Biographical Notice of Dante in the 1494 edition of the 
Speculum Historiale (in English Historical Review, April) ; Dante's 
References to Pythagoras (in Romania, July) ; Dante's Obligations 
to Orosius (in same) ; Dante's Obligations to Alfraganus in the Vita 
Nuova and Convivio (in same) ; Some Unacknowledged Obligations 
of Dante to Albertus Magnus (in same) ; Dante's Statement as to the 



150 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1895 — continued. 
Relations of Alexander the Great with the Romans {Mon. ii. 9) (in 
Academy, Aug. 10) ; Biagi and Passerini's ' Codice Diploniatico 
Dantesco ' (in same, Aug. 31) ; Le Teorie Dantesche sulle Macchie 
della Luna (in Giornale Storico delta Letteratura Italiana, xxvi.). 

M. A. GooDiEE : Dante's Inferno (i. 30) (in Notes and Queries, 
Feb. 23). 

E. Moore : Giornale Dantesco (in Academy, March 2) ; Anon. : 
same (in Athenaeum, April 3). 

C. ToMLiNSON : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, March 16). 

The Portrait of Dante (in Athenaeum, March 30). 

W. Boyd Carpenter : Dante's Geryon (in Tlw Minster, 
April). 

E. MooRE : The Classical Studies of Dante (in Edinburgh Review, 
April). 

Eleanor F. Jourdain : Dante's use of the Divine Name in the 
Divina Commedia (in Expository Times, April) ; The Women of the 
Divina Commedia (in same, July). 

A. J. Butler : ' Cosa fatta capo ha ' (Inf. xxviii. 107) (in Athenaeum, 
April 20). 

Georgina E. Troutbeck : Music in Dante's Divine Comedy (in 
Musical Times, July 1). 

W. Mercer : Dante and the Story of Romeo and Juliet (in 
Academy, Aug. 17). 

R. H. Thornton : Dante's Geography (in Notes and Queries, 
Aug. 17) ; C. Tomlinson : same (in same, Sept. 14). 

A. G. F. Howell : ' Vario ' or ' Varro ' in Purg. xxii. 98 ? (in 
Academy, Nov. 9). 

F. B. Dicksee : crayon study for ' Francesca ' in following ; oil 
painting of ' Paolo and Francesca '. (R. A., No. 171.) 

John D. Batten : drawings (5) in black and white of ' Dante and 
Beatrice ' ; ' Beatrice, Laura, and Fiammetta ' ; ' Dante, Petrarch, 
and Boccaccio ' ; ' Giotto* and Corso Donati ' ; ' Farinata degli 
Uberti, Buondelmonte de' Buondelmonti, Guido Cavalcanti and 
Piccarda Donati ' (engraved as illustrations to M. Hewlett's Masque 
of Dead Florentines). 

Simeon Solomon : water-colour of ' Dante in Esilio '. 

1896 
E. Moore : Studies in Dante. First Series. Scripture and Classical 
Authors in Dante. (Oxford.) 

Botticelli's Drawings for Dante's Divina Commedia. Reduced 



IN LITERATURE AND ART ' 151 

Facsimiles after the Originals in the Royal Museum, Berlin, and in 
the Vatican Library. With Introduction and Commentary by 
F. Lippmann. (Lond.) 

R. Garnett : Dante, Petrarch, Camoens : CXXIV Sonnets. 
(Lond.) (Contains verse translation of twenty sonnets of Dante.) 

Maurice Hewlett : ' Donna e gentil ' ; 'La Pia ' ; translation 
(rhymed quatrain) of Inf. v. 121-3 (in Songs and Meditations, 
Westm.) 

James Lindsay : The Mind of Dante (in Essays, Literary and 
Philosophical. Edin.) 

Caroline C. Potter : Cantos from the Divina Commedia of 
Dante (in rhymed quatrains). (Lond.) 

Rose E. Selfe and P. H. VVicksteed : Selections from the First 
Nine Books of the Croniche Fiorentine of Giovanni Villani. Trans- 
lated for the use of Students of Dante and Others. (Westm.) 

F. H. Cliffe : Dante (in Manual of Italian Literature, Lond.). 

A. B. MiALL : ' Beata Beatrix ' (sonnet) (in Nocturnes and Pas- 
torals, Lond.). 

P. H. Wicksteed : Dante. The De Monarchia, Translated into 
English and Annotated. (Hull, priv. pr.) ; Syllabus of a First 
Course of Ten Lectures on Dante. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : A Doubtful Reading in Dante's Letter to the 
Emperor Henry VII (in Academy, Jan. 11) ; Volkmann's ' Icono- 
grafia Dantesca ' (in Mancliester Guardian, Feb. 16) ; same (in 
Literature, May 6) ; Scartazzini's edition of the Divina Commedia 
(in Academy, April 11) ; Mercati's ' Pietro Peccatore ' {Par. xxi. 
121-3) (in same) ; Pasqualigo's ' Pensieri suU' AUegoria della Vita 
Nuova di Dante ' (in same) ; Dante's use of ' rendersi ' {Inf. xxvii. 83) 
and ' renduto ' {Purg. xx. 54) (in Academy, June 20) ; Rajna's 
edition of the De Vulgari Eloquentia (in same, Aug. 22) ; Dante and 
the Book of Tobit (in same, Oct. 80) ; Dante's Reference to Sardana- 
palus {Par. xv. 107-8) (in same, Nov. 7). 

Ll. Thomas : A MS. of the Divina Commedia in a Lisbon Library 
(in Academy, Feb. 8). 

John Muir : Dante and Beatrice — a Mediaeval Love Episode (in 
Scots Magazine, March). 

J. B. S. : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, March 7). 

D. M. O'Connor : The Place of the Holy Trinity in the Divina 
Commedia (in Dublin Review, April). 

The Cornell Dante Collection (in Manchester Guardian, April 11). 

W. J. GiLLUM : English Translations of Dante (in Notes and 
Queries, June 13). 



162 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1896 — continued. 

John Hebb : Dante's Caorsa (in Notes and Queries, June 18) ; 
W. St. Clair Baddeley : same (in same, Aug. 29). 

Scartazzini's edition of the Divina Commedia (in Atlienaeum, 
June 27). 

W. B. Yeats : William Blake and his Illustrations to the Divine 
Comedy. Blake's Opinions on Dante (in Savoy Magazine, July, 
Aug., Sept.). 

John Earle : Dante's VUa Nuova (in Quarterly Review, July). 

Giornale Daniesco (in Athenaeum, July 11) ; Lubin's ' Dante e gli 
Astronomi Italiani ' (in same). 

J. BoucHiER : ' Sommo Giove ' (Purg. vi. 118) (in Notes and Queries, 
July 21) ; Dante Query (Inf. xiv. 38-9) (in same, Dec. 15). 

Mrs. M. Mulhall : Celtic Sources of the Divina Commedia (in 
Dublin Review, Oct.). 

J. S. Phillimore : translation (verse) of Son. xv {V.N., § 26) (in 
Oxford Magazine, Oct. 28). 

T. Delta : Dante's Reference to Sardanapalus (in Academy, 
Nov. 14). 

E. Moore : Santa Lucia in the Divina Commedia (read before 
Oxford Dante Society, Nov. 21 ; Tprinted in Studies in Dante. IV. 1917). 

J. Anster : translation (ierza rima) of Par. xxxi. 1-111 (in Herm- 
athena, xxii. Dubl.) 

Simeon Solomon : crayon of ' II Sogno di Dante Esiliato di 
Firenze '. 

Julius Rolshoven : water-colour of ' II Paese di Dante '. (R.A., 
No. 1174.) 

c. 1897 

A. J. Butler : translation of Book i of the Convivio (not published ; 
see Memoir by Sir A. Quiller-Couch, pp. 114, 187).) 

1897 

E. H. Pember : translation (blank verse) of Par. xv (in Adrastus 
ofPhrygia and other Poems, Lond., priv. pr.) 

Caroline C. Potter : Twenty-five Cantos from the Divina 
Commedia of Dante (in rhymed quatrains). (Lond.) 

Gerald Molloy : Extracts from the Divina Commedia of Dante, 
being the Passages illustrated by the Drawings of Botticelli, with 
a Translation in Blank Verse. A Fragment. (Dubl. ; anonymous.) 

John Halsham, in Idlehurst, quotes (p. 41) Dante's descriptions of 
cooing pigeons {Par. xxv. 19-21) ; (p. 61) of the evening bell (Purg. 
viii. 6) ; (p. 96) of wind in pine woods (Purg. xxviii. 19-20) ; (p. 117) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 158 

of the effect of shadow on fire (Purg. xxvi. 7-8), and his reference 
(Par. xxiv. 26-7) to the use of subdued colours in painting the folds 
in drapery ; (p. 165) his descriptions of the storm on Pratomagno 
(Purg. V. 109 ff.) ; of the distant shimmering of the sea (Purg. i. 165- 
17); of darkling waters (Purg. xxviii. 31); and refers (p. 186) to 
Daniello's commentary on the Commedia, and to the Convito. 

Frank Horridge : Dante (in Lives of Great Italians, Lond.). 

Francis Thompson, in his Ode for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen 
Victoria, introduces ' sole-thoughted Dante ' (in Collected Poetry, 
1913). 

C. H. Bromby : A Question of the Water and of the Land, by 
Dante Alighieri. Translated into English, with an Introduction and 
Notes. (Lond.) 

WicKHAM Flower : Dante. A Defence of the Ancient Text of 
the Divina Commedia (Inf. xxviii. 135). (Lond.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : University Extension Lectures. Proposed 
Course on Dante. (Carab.) ; Syllabus of a Summer Course of Five 
Lectures on Dante's Convito, and some of Dante's Scholastic and 
Poetic Teachers. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : Dante's Reference to Mt. Aetna (Par. viii. 
67-70) (in Academy, Jan. 2) ; Rajna's Critical Text of the De Vulgari 
Eloquentia (in Sixteenth Annual Report of the Cambridge, U.S.A., 
Dante Society, May 18) ; Dante's Seven Examples of Munificence in 
the Convivio (iv. 11) (in Romania, July); Some Italian Dante Books 
(in Modern Language Quarterly, July) ; Dante's Reference to the 
Spear of Peleus (Inf. xxxi. 4-6) (in same, Oct.) ; Dante's Obligations 
to the Magnae Derivationes of Uguccione da Pisa (in Romania, Oct.) ; 
The Editio Princeps of the Treatise De Aqiui et Terra ascribed to 
Dante (in Athetiaeum, Oct. 16) ; The QvMestio de Aqua et Terra (in 
Literature, Dec. 4) ; The Coins denominated ' Santelene ' by Dante 
(in Giorn. Stor. Lett. Ital. xxx) ; Dante's Theory as to the Projection 
of the Shadow of the Earth (Par. ix. 118-19) (in same) ; A Misreading 
in recent editions of Dante's Letter to Can Grande (Epist. x. 22) (in 
same). 

James Williams : Dante as a Jurist (in Law Magazine and Review, 
Feb.). 

Scartazzini's ' Enciclopedia Dantesca ' (in Athenaeum, Feb. 20). 

E. G. Gardner : Donna Pietra (in Gentleman's Magazine, 
March). 

J. Bouchier : Dante Query (Inf. xiv. 38-9) (in Notes and Queries, 
Mar. 2 ; June 8). 

J. B. S. : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, May 8). 



154 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 897 — continued. 

E. Moore : Dante as a Religious Teacher (in Fortnightly Review, 
Aug. ; Dec). 

Beck's edition of the Vita Nuova (in Athenaeum, Sept. 11). 

E. Armstrong : Ser Manfredi da Vico {Conv. iv. 29) (in Modern 
Language Quarterly, Oct.). 

R. H. Thornton : Palmerston and Dante (in Notes and Queries, 
Oct. 2). 

H. H. M. : Comparative Knowledge of the Bible in Dante and 
Shakespeare (in Spectator, Oct. 30). 

A. Porter : The Celestial Hierarchy of the Divina Commedia (in 
Monthly Packet, Nov.) ; The Angels of the Divina Commedia (in 
same, Dec). 

C. H. Bromby : The Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (in Literature, 
Dec. 18). 

Arthur Turrell : etching of ' Beatrice, after T. F. Dicksee '. 
(R. A., No. 1583.) 

John Elliott : photo-engraving of ' Dante in Exile '. 

1897-1900 
John D. Batten : brush drawings (44) in black and white, in 
illustration of the Inferno. 

[In possession of Mr. Geo. Musgrave at Oxford ; engraved on wood by 
Richard Taylor & Co. as illustrations for new edition (not yet published) 
of the owner's translation of the Inferno (1893) ; exhibited at Leighton 
House, May 1900.] 

1898 
E. G. Gardner : Dante's Ten Heavens — a Study of the Paradiso. 
(Westm.) 

E. Lee-Hamilton : The Inferno of Dante, Translated with Plain 
Notes. (Lond.). 

[Reviewed in Atlienaeum, March 12 ; Saturday Review, March 12 ; Litera- 
ture, March 26 ; Illustrated London News, April 9.] 
Constance Blount : Some Similes from the Paradiso. Collected 
and Translated. (Lond.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : A Provisional Translation of the Early Lives 
of Dante, and of his Poetical Correspondence with Giovanni del 
Virgilio. (Hull, priv. pr.) ; A Provisional Translation of Dante's 
Political Letters. (Hull, priv. pr.) 

R. C. Jebb : A Greek Version of Leopardi's Ode on the Monument 
of Dante at Florence. (Camb.) 

Rosemary A. Cotes : Dante's Garden. With Prefatory Note by 
Paget Toynbee. (Lond.) 

Catherine M. Phillimore : Dante at Ravenna. A Study. (Lond.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 155 

Emily Underdown (' Norley Chester ') : Stories from Dante. 
(Lond.) 

C. Mabel Lawrence and P. H. Wicksteed : Essays on Dante 
(from the Dante-Forschungen of Karl Witte), selected, translated, 
and edited with Introduction, Notes, and Appendices. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable 
Matters in the Works of Dante. (Oxford.) 

Sir S. W. Griffith : Two Stories from Dante, literally translated 
in the Original Metre (' The Story of Francesca ', Inf. v ; ' The Story 
of Ugolino ', Inf. xxxii-iii). (Brisbane.) 

R. Garnett : Dante's Life and Writings (in A History of Italian 
Literature, Lond.). 

Paget Toynbee : The Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (in Literature, 
Jan. 1, 29) ; A Biographical Notice of Dante in the 1494 edition of 
the Speculum Historiale (in Modern Quarterly of Language and 
Literature, March) ; The Source of a hitherto unidentified Quotation 
in the De MoTtarchia (ii. 5) (in Athenaeum, March 26) ; Dante and 
the word Honorificabilitudinitatibus (in Literature, April 9); Tons 
Pietatis ' in the De Monarchia (ii. 5) (in Athenaeum, April 9) ; The 
Chronology of Par. vi. 1-6, 37-9 (in saine, Aug. 6) ; Oelsner's 
' Dante in Frankreich ' (in Literature, Sept. 10) ; Dante's Refer- 
ences to the Digestum (in Athenaeum, Oct. 1) ; Dante and the Index 
Expurgatorius (in Literature, Oct. 22) ; ' Ildebrandinus Paduanus ' 
in the De Vulgari Eloquentia (i. 14) (in Athenaeum, Oct. 29). 

Gladstone on Dante (in Manchester Evening News, Jan. 4). 

C. H. Brojiby : The Quaestio de Aqua el Terra (in Literature, 
Jan. 15). 

D. R. Fearon : Dante and Paganism (in Nineteenth Century, Feb.). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante's First Defender (in Irish Ecclesiastical 
Record, Feb.). 

John Earle : Dante's Paradiso (xvii. 70-2) (in Literature, Feb. 
19) ; Dante (ui saine, April 9). 

W. P. Ker : Historical Notes on the Similes of Dante (in Modern 
Quarterly of Language and Literature, March). 

Rajna's ed. min. of the De Vulgari Eloque?itia (in Literature, 
March 26) ; same (in Athenaeum, Aug. 13). 

E. Armstrong : The Posthumous Popularity of Dante (in Church 
Quarterly Review, April). 

E. Moore : The Astronomy of Dante (in Quarterly Review, 
April). 

A. J. Butler : ' Fons Pietatis ' {Man. ii. 5) (in Athenaeum, 
April 2). 



156 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 898 — cotitinued. 

F. Hendriks : Dante and C. Hindley (in Notes and Queries 
April 2). 

Margaret Stokes : Coincidences in Dante and Shakespeare (in 
Notes and Queries, May 14). 

WiCKHAM . Flower : Mr. Gladstone and Dante (in Athenaeum, 
May 28). 

C. E. Tyrer : Dante and the Scaligers (in Manchester Quarterly, 
July). 

R. M. Spence : Gary's Notes to his Translation of Dante (in Notes 
and Queries, July 2). 

J. B. S. : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, July 9). 

H. W. Pereira : On Dante's knowledge of Heraldry (in Moring's 
Quarterly, Aug.). 

Giornale Dantesco (in Athenaeum, Aug. 18) ; Scartazzini's ' Enciclo- 
pedia Dantesca ' (in same) ; Volkmann's ' Iconografia Dantesca ' (in 
same, Aug. 27). 

C. ToMLiNsoN : The Angels of the Divine Comedy (in Gentleman's 
Magazine, Sept.). 

H. Oelsnek : Dante's Beatrice and Villon's Beatris (in Literature, 
Sept, 24). 

Studies on the Paradiso (in Church Quarterly Review, Oct.). 

A. J. Butler : Some Dante Notes (in Modern Language Quarterly, 
ii). 

1899 

E. Moore : Studies in Dante. Second Series. Miscellaneous 
Essays . ( Oxford . ) 

C. L. Shadwell : The Purgatory of Dante Alighieri. Part ii. 

The Earthly Paradise (Cantos xxviii-xxxiii). An Experiment in 

Literal Verse Translation. With Introduction by John Earle. 

(Lond.) 

[Reviewed in Literature, April 1 ; St. James's Gazette, May 3 ; Athenaeum, 
May 27.] 

P. H, WiCKSTEED and H. Oelsner : The Paradiso of Dante 
Alighieri. Translated, with Notes. (Lond.) 

J. F. HoGAN : The Life and Works of Dante AUighieri, being an 
Introduction to the Study of the Divina Commedia. (Lond.) 

F. J. Snell : Dante (in The Fourteenth Century, Edin.). 

Mary A. Vialls : translation {Jierza rima) of Inf. xxxiii. 22-75 ; 
Purg. XXX. 22-75 ; Par. xi. 48-117 ; xxxiii. 1-89 (in Music Fancies, 
and other Verses, Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 157 

E. H. Pember : translation (blank verse) oi Purg. viii (in The Death 
Song of Thamyris, and other Poems, Lond., priv. pr.). 

Samuel Home : The Purgatory of Dante. A New Translation in 
tlie Orijifinal Rhythm. Part i. Cantos i-xvi. (Oswestry.) 

A. C. AucHMUTY : Purgatory. A Translation from Dante in 
Octosyllabic Terza Bima. (Lond.) 

C. L. Shadwell : Notices of Siena in the Divina Cominedia (read 
liefore London Dante Society, Nov. 15 ; printed in Dante Society 
Lectures, iii. Lond., 1909). 

William Wordsworth : Dante and Virgil (in Gleanings of Verse, 
Lond., priv. pr.). 

John Hebb : The Study of Dante in America (in Notes and Queries, 
Jan. 21 ; April 15). 

Oxford and Dante (in Literature, Feb. 11). 

I. GiGLiOLi : Dante and the action of Light upon Plants (in 
Nature, March 2). 

How to study Dante (in Speaker, March 18). 

A. Hall : Dante's Wife (in Notes and Queries, March 25). 

Paget Toynbee : Benvenuto da Imola and his Commentary on 
the Divina Commedia (read before Oxford Dante Society, Feb. 7 ; 
printed in An English Miscellany presented to Dr. Furnivall, Oxford, 
1901 ) ; The Date of Dante's Embassy to San (iemignano (in Athen- 
aeum, April 8) ; The Identity of Clemenza {Par. ix. 1) (in same. 
May 20 ; June 3) ; Dante as a Business-Man (in Literature, June 17) ; 
The Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (in same, July 8) ; Siger de Brabant 
{Par. X. 136) (in Athenaeum, July 29) ; The Bones of Ugolino (in 
Literature, Sept. 30) ; Dante's Daughter Beatrice (in same) ; A Dis- 
j)uted Reading in the De Monorchia (ii. 1) (in Athenaeum, Oct. 21) ; 
Dante and Shakespeare (in same, Dec. 2) ; The Poet's Ear : ' Tin 
tin sonando ' {Par. x. 143) (in Literature, Dec. 9) ; A Misquotation 
of Dante's ui the Convivio (i. 12) (in Giorn. Stor. Lett. Ital. xxxiii) ; 
Aristotle's De Animalibu^ in Dante and other Mediaeval Writers (in 
same, xxxiv) ; ' Aeneidorum ' in the De Vulgari Eloquentia (in 
same). 

H. F. TozER : Dante as a Topographer (in Modern Quarterly 
of Language and Literature, April). 

T. H. Warren : Dante and the Art of Poetry (in Quarterly 
Review, April). 

The Sixth Centenary of the Divina Commedia (in Literature, 
April 8). 

A. J. Butler : The Identity of Clemenza {Par. ix. 1) (in AtJienaeum 
May 27) ; Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, July 15). 



158 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 899 — continued. 
T. P. Armstrong : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, June 3) ; 
J. B. S. : same (in same, June 17). 

D. R. Fearon : Dante's Ghosts (in Nineteenth Century, July). 

W. Barker : The Dantean Idea of Future Punishment (in 
Primitive Methodist Quarterly Review, July). 

H. Krebs : Goethe on Dante (in Notes and Queries, July 15). 

The Poet of Christendom (Dante) (in Daily Chronicle, July 26). 

' Con Dante e per Dante : Discorsi e Conferenze ' (in AtJienaeum, 
Sept. 2). 

Dante and his Readers (in Academy, Sept. 9). 

Koch's ' Catalogue of the Cornell Dante Collection ' (in Literature, 
Sept. 16). 

F. Kettle : Dante in England (in Academy, Sept. 16) ; The 
Translation of Dante (in same, Oct. 7). 

F. Thompson : Cary's Translation of Dante (in Academy, Sept. 23) ; 
V. Rendall : same (in saine). 

Del Lungo's ' Da Bonifazio VIII ad Arrigo VII ' (in Athenaeum, 
Sept. 23). 

Dante and his Development (in Academy, Oct. 11). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante's Correspondence with Guido and Messer 
Cino (in The Month, Nov.). 

C. E. Tyrer : Dante and Shakespeare (in Athenaeum, Nov. 25). 

Dante Alighieri— An Irish Tribute (in Dublin Weekly Nation, 
Nov. 25). 

R. Garnett : Stephen Phillips's ' Paolo and Francesca ' (in Anglo- 
Saxon Review, Dec.). 

Eleanor C. Price : The Poet's Ear : ' Tin tin sonando ' [Par. 
X. 148) (in Literature, Dec. 9) ; T. H. Warren : same (in same, 
Dec. 16). 

The Divina Commedia (in Manchester Guardian, Dec. 27). 

William Clark : Dante's Divine Comedy (in Canadian Magazine, 
xiii). 

J. Byam Shaw : oil painting of ' Love the Conqueror ' (Paolo and 
Francesca, one of the details). (R.A., No. 906.) 

F. Derwent Wood : bronze group of ' Dante at Ravenna ' (Paolo 
and Francesca, one of the details). (R.A., No. 1942 ; Glasgow Exh., 
1901). 

1899-1902 
Phoebe A. Traquair : illustrations (41) in water-colour of the 
Poems of the Vita Nuova (executed for Sir T. G. Carmichael ; photo- 
graphic reproduction, Edin., 1902). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 159 

c. 1900 

Lewis Campbell : translation (verse) of Son. xi {V.N., § 21) (in 
Memorials in Verse and Prose of Lewis Campbell, Lend., priv. pr., 
1914). 

1900 

Paget Toynbee : La Commsdia di Dante Alighieri : il testo 
Wittiano riveduto. (Lond.) 

[' Per il Sesto Centenario del Viaggio di Dante, mccc-mdcccc.'] 

E. Moore : La Divina Comm^dia di Dante Alighieri, nuovamente 
rivediita nel testo, con Indice dei Nomi Propri compilato da Paget 
Toynbee. (Oxford.) 

W. W. Vernon : Readings on the Paradiso of Dante. . . . With 
Introduction by the Bishop of Ripon (W. Boyd Carpenter). (Lend., 
2 vols. ; second ed. 1909.) 

H. Oelsner : Notes to Carlyle's Translation of the Inferno (in 
Temple Classics, Lond.). 

Stephen Phillips : Paolo and Francesca ; a Tragedy in Four 
Acts. (Lond.) 

Sir Edward Fry : The Banquet of Dante (in Studies by the Way, 
Lond.). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante (in Temple Primers, Lend.). 

Paget Toynbee : Life of Dante (Lond. ; second ed., 1901 ; 
third ed., 1904 ; reissue, 1905 ; Italian trans., 1908 ; fourth ed., 
1910). 

George Saintsbury : Dante (in vol. i ' Classical and Mediaeval 
Criticism ', of A History of Criticism and Literary Taste in Europe, 
Lond.) ; in vol. ii, the opinions on Dante of Sir Thomas Pope Blount, 
La Harpe, and Rivarol, are reviewed ; and in vol. iii, those of Leigh 
Hunt, Wordsworth, and Hazlitt. 

E. McCuRDY : The Vita Nuova (in Roses of Paestum, Lond.). 

T. E. Brown : Dante and Ariosto (in Collected Poems, Lond.). 

Paget Toynbee : Gary's Dante — Hell. Revised, with Intro- 
duction. (Lond.) 

La Commedia di Dante (in Journal of Education, Jan.) ; same (in 
Literary World, Jan. 19). 

P. H. Wicksteed : Dante (in Daily Chronicle, Jan. 1). 

Dante the Man (in Academy, Jan. 6). 

Catherine M. Phillimore : On the Exile of Dante (read before 
London Dante Society, Jan. 24 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
i. Lond., 1904). 

Emily Underdown (' Norley Chester ') : Historical Influences 
of the Divine Comedy (in Gentleman's Magazine, Feb.). 



160 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1900 — continited. 

English Dante Literature (in Westminster Gazette, Feb. 5). 

The Divitia Commedia (in Literature, Feb. 17) ; same (in Morning 
Post, April 19). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Feb. 24) ; 
T. P. Armstrong : same (in same, July 28). 

R. Garnett: The Vicissitudes of Dante's Literary Reputation 
(read before London Dante Society, Feb. 28 ; printed in Dante 
Society Lectures, i. Lond., 1904). 

Alfred Ainger : Some Aspects of Stephen Phillips's new Tragedy 
(' Paolo and FraneesCa ') (in Pilot, March 3). 

LuiGi Ricci : Fair Women in the Divina Commedia (read before 
London Dante Society, March 14 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
i. Lond., 1904). 

English Reprints of the Divina Commedia (in Spliere, March 17). 

Dante from an English Printing Office (in Daily News, March 21). 

A Beginner's Dante (in Echo, March 26). 

J. L. Bevis : Colours in Dante (in Scottish Review, April). 

Hope Rea : Dante and Art (in Speaker, April 21). 

H. Krebs : Dante's Vision (in Notes and Queries, April 21). 

Paget Toynbee : A Reproduction of the Codice Trivulziano of 
the De Vulgari Eloquentia (in Athenaeum, April 28) ; The Death of 
Siger de Brabant (Par. x. 135-6) (in same, June 9) ; The Jesi Dante 
at the Tessier Sale (in same, June 23) ; Homer in Dante and in 
Benvenuto da Imola (in Romania, July) ; Tartar Cloths [Inf. xvii. 
14-17) (in same, Oct.); 'Seneca Morale' {Inf. iv. 141), (in Giorn. 
Star. Lett. Ital. xxxv). 

Dante (in Morning Leader, May 8). 

Alfred H. Huth : The Tessier Library and the Jesi Dante (in 
Athenaeum, May 12 ; Jime 2). 

Magda Heinemann-Sindici : Dante as a Love Poet (read before 
London Dante Society, May 16 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
iii. Lond., 1909). 

Alfred Austin : Dante's Realistic Treatment of the Ideal (read 
before London Dante Society, June 13 ; printed in Dante Society 
Lectures, i. Lond., 1904). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante at Bologna (in Athenaeum, June 16). 

G. W. KiTCiiiN : Dante and Virgil in the Divina Commedia (read 
before London Dante Society, June 21 ; printed in Ruskin in 
Oxford, 1903). 

John Hebb : Dante's House at Mulazzo (in Notes and Queries, 
June 80). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 161 

Performance in the Princess Hall, Cheltenham (July), by members 
of the Ladies' College Guild, of ' Scenes from the Vita Nuova and the 
Divina Commedia of Dante '. 

J. Phillipson : Dante's Divina Commedia (in Primitive Methodist 
Quarterly Review, July). 

Louis Fagan : The Jesi Dante (in Athenaeum, July 14). 

P. H. WicKSTEED : Del Virgilio's Epitaph on Dante (in AtJienaeum, 
July 21, 28). 

Dante's Life and Works (in Morning Post, Aug. 17). 

D. R. Fearon : The Study of Dante (in Pilot, Aug. 18) ; Aeschylus 
and Dante (in same, Oct. 27) ; Dante and Bunyan (in same, Dec. 22). 

E. Moore : The DXV Prophecy (Purg. xxxiii. 37-45) (read before 
Oxford Dante Society, Nov. 13 ; privately printed, Oxford, 1901). 

Vincent Brooks : chromolithograph of ' General View of Paradise 
according to Dante ' (illustration to W. W. Vernon's Readings on 
the Paradiso). 

Mrs. John Young Hunter : oil painting of ' The Denial. Dante 
and Beatrice ' {V.N., § 10, 11. 11-16). (R.A., No. 506.) 

Sidney Herbert : Scenes (3) from the Commedia — ' Dante in the 
Dark Wood ' (7n/. i) ; ' The Gate of Hell ' {Inf. iii) ; ' The Gate of 
Purgatory ' {Purg. ix) ; painted for performance at Cheltenham in 
July of ' Scenes from Dante ' (see above). 

Cent. XX. 
1901 

H. F. Tozer : An English Commentary on Dante's Divina Com- 
media. (Oxford.) 

T. Okey and H. Oelsner : The Purgatorio of Dante Alighieri. 
Translated, with Notes. (Lond.) 

B. Berenson : Dante's Visual Images, and his Early Illustrators 
(in The Study and Criticism of Italian Art, Lond.). 

Lady Margaret Sackville : The Death of Beatrice (in Poems, 
Lond.). 

Paget Toynbee : Cary's Dante — Purgatory. Revised, with 
Introduction. (Lond.) 

E. H. Pember : translation (blank verse) of Inf. i-iv (in The 
Finding of Pheidippides and other Poems, Lond., priv. pr.). 

J. Carpenter Garnier : Dante's Divina Commedia. The Inferno. 
A Literal Prose Translation. (Lond., priv. pr.) 

Samuel Home : The Purgatory of Dante, i-xxxi. A New 
Translation in the Rhythm of the Original. (Lond.) 

P, H. Wicksteed : Syllabus of a Course of Twelve Lectures on 
Dante's Purgatorio. Camb. Univ. Local Lectures. (Camb.) 

M 



162 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1901^ — continued. 

David Binning Monro, in his edition of Books xiii-xxiv of 
the Odyssey, illustrates (pp. 470-1) the nature of the supremacy 
of epic Greek by the account given by Dante in the De Vulgari 
Elogumitia (i. 16-19) of the Italian of his own time. 

A. J. Butler : A Dante Translation seen in 1540 (in Athenaeum, 
Jan. 5). 

E. G. Gardner : The Dedication of the Divina Commedia (in 
The Month, Feb.). 

W. C. Green : Dante's Illustrations from Animal Life (in Anti- 
quary, March). 

C. C. Tarelli : Milton and Dante (in Pilot, March 2). 

J. B. McGovern : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, March 16 ; 
May 25 ; Sept. 14) ; H. G. Hope : same (in same, April 20) ; E. Yard- 
ley : same (in same, April 20 ; May 25). 

Ancient and Modern Criticism (Dante's De Vulgari Eloqu^ntia) (in 
Quarterly Review, April). 

Georgina E. Troutbeck : Memories of Dante in Westminster 
Abbey (in Kensington, April -Sept.). 

D. R. Fearon : Dante's Prophetical Enigma, a New Solution (in 
Pilot, April 13). 

J. L. Bevis : Bird-life in Dante (in Pilot, April 27). 

Dante's Inferno (in Pilot, May 4). 

Sir G. Douglas : Landscape in the Divine Comedy (read before 
London Dante Society, May 8 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
ii. Lond., 1906). 

T. H. Warren : Gray and Dante (in Monthly Review, June). 

P. M. T. Craigie : Dante and Botticelli (read before London Dante 
Society, June 5 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, i, Lond., 1904). 

The Dante Society (in Standard, June 6). 

Dante and Botticelli (in Daily Chronicle, June 6). 

Paget Toynbee : The Meaning of ' Gente dispetta ' in the Inferno 
(ix. 91) (in Athenaeum, June 8); A Latin Translation of the Divina 
Commedia quoted by Stillingfleet (in same, Nov. 30) ; Index of 
Authors quoted by Benvenuto da Imola in his Commentary on the 
Divina Commedia (in Nineteenth Annual Report of the Cambridge, 
U.S.A., Dante Society) ; ' Camminata di Palagio ' and ' Natural 
Burella ' {Inf. xxxiv. 97-9) (in Giorn. Stor. Lett. Ital., xxxviii). 

E. MooRE : The Date of Dante's Vision (in Quarterly Review, July), 
Vernon Lushington : Dante (sonnet) (in^ Positivist Review, 

July). 

John Cuttell : Dante's ' Divine Comedy ' (in Great Thoughts, 
July 18). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 163 

The John Rylands Library at Manchester acquires by purchase 
with the Crawford MSS. (Aug.) a Cent. XIV MS. of the Commedia 
(MS. Ucd. 2), and a Cent. XV MS. of the Canzoni (MS. Ital. 1). 

Dante Literature (in Athenaeum, Aug. 31) ; same (in Glasgow 
Herald, Dec. 14). 

Florence and Dante (in Academy, Sept. 7). 

Dante's Commedia (in Pilot, Sept. 14). 

W. Whitehead : Dante AUghieri on Dialects (in Manchester 
Quarterly, Oct.). 

Dante's City (in Daily Chronicle, Oct. 15). 

A Great Witness (Dante) (in Outlook, Nov. 9). 

Edward Caird : The Allegorical Method, its Origin, and Dante's 
use of it (read before Oxford Dante Society, Nov. 12). 

Thomas Hodgkin : Charles Martel (Par. ix. 1) (read before London 
Dante Society, Nov. 20 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, i. Lond., 
1904). 

' St. Swithin ' : The Youthful Year {Inf. xxiv. 1) (in Notes and 
Queries, Dec. 14). 

1902 

E. C. Lowe : La Divina Commedia of Dante Alighieri, Englished 
(blank verse) (Ely, priv. pr. ; revised ed. pub. in 1904). 

Frances de Mey : The Vita Nuova, or New Life. Translated 
from the Italian. (Lond.) 

Lo Inferno di Dante Alighieri Fiorentino. (Nella Stamperia di 
Ashendene ; printed by C. H. St. John Hornby). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante Studies and Researches (Lond. ; Italian 
trans., 1899, 1904) ; Cary's Dante — Paradise. Revised, with Intro- 
duction (Lond.). 

H. .1. Chaytor : The Troubadours of Dante ; being Selections 
from the Works of the Provengal Poets quoted by Dante. (Oxford.) 

Karl Federn : Dante and his Time. With Introduction by 
A. J. Butler. (Lond.) 

Eleanor F. Jourdain : A Study in the Symbolism of the Divina 
Commedia. (Sheldon.) 

G. Pradeau : A Key to the Time Allusions in the Divine Comedy 
of Dante Alighieri. (Lond.) 

W. J. Payling Wright : Dante and the Divine Comedy. Studies 
and Notes. (Lond.) 

John Payne : ' With a copy of the Divina Commedia ' (sonnet) 
(in Poetical Works. Lond.). 

Arthur Symons : Beata Beatrix (in Poems, Lond.). 

Henry A. Beers : Keats, Leigh Hunt, and the Dante Revival 
(in History of Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century, Lond.). 

H2 



164 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 902 — continued. 

L. V. HoDGKiN : The Happy World. Notes on the Mystic Imagery 
of the Paradiso of Dante. (Lond.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED and E. G. Gardner : Dante and Giovanni del 
Virgilio. Including a Critical Edition of the text of Dante's Eclogae 
Latinae, and of the poetic remains of Giovanni del Virgilio. (Westm.) 

George Noble Plunkett : translation (verse) of Son. xxii 
(F.iV., §89) (not published; sent to Professor Edward Dowden, 
Oct. 9, 1902). 

C. E. Tyrer : In the Footsteps of Dante (in Manchester Quarterly, 
Jan.). 

A Friend of Dante (in Daily Chronicle, Jan. 1). 

Dante's Purgatorio (in Weekly Register, Jan. 24) ; same (in Pilot, 
April 12). 

Dante's Italy (in Church Times, Jan. 31). 

E. MooRE : Un Passo oscuro e di dubbiosa lettura nel Convivio (iii. 
5, 11. 152-4) (in Bull. Soc. Dant. Ital., N.S. ix. 131-2. Febb.-Marzo); 
A New Reading in the Convivio of Dante (in Athenaeum, June 21). 

Paget Toynbee : Two alleged quotations from Dante by Robert 
Greene (in Athenaeum, Feb. 15, 22) ; Dinsmore's ' Teachings of 
Dante ' (in Manchester Guardian, March 4) ; Federn's ' Dante and 
his Time ' (in saine, Oct. 21) ; Holbrook's ' Dante and the Animal 
Kingdom ' (in same, Nov. 4) ; ' Dantesque ', ' Dantist ', &c., in the 
New English Dictionary (in Athenaeum, Aug. 9). 

Dante and his Contemporaries (in Tablet, Feb. 1). 

Dante's Divine Comedy : The Message of the Middle Ages (in Daily 
News, Feb. 13). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante's Lyrical Poems connected with the 
Divina Commedia (in Weekly Register, Feb. 21) ; Dante and Shake- 
speare (in Dublin Review, April). 

The Boodling of Dante (in Publisher's Circular, Feb. 22). 
Dante and Petrarch (in Weekly Register, March 7). 
The play of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (by Stephen Phillips) produced 
by George Alexander at St. James's Theatre (March 14). 
The Divine Poet (in Daily Chronicle, March 17). 
Sidelights on Dante (in Guardian, March 19). 

F. J. Snell : Dante Books (in Speaker, March 22) ; The Motif of 
the Divina Commedia (in .same, May 8). 

Sir E. Sullivan : Dante and Herodotus (in Athenaeum, March 
29) ; A. J. Butler : same (in same, April 5). 

Dante Literature (in Saturday Review, April 12). 

W. Harvey : Dante's ' Divine Comedy ' (in University Correspon- 
dent, April 15 ; May 1). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 165 

A. HiGGiNS : Dante and the Fine Arts (in Nineteenth Century, May). 

Books on Dante (in Athenaeum, May 17). 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : Dante's Vision of Universal Peace (in New Age, 
June 2). 

T. A. Seed : The Dante Revival (in Great Thoughts, June 7). 
Anon. : Dante's Lyrics (in same). 

The Florentine (1-1.81) edition of the Divina Commedia at the 
Fountaine Sale (in Daily News, June 13). 

W. D. Scull : Dante's De Monarchia (in Spectatm; June 14). 

W. Hughes Hallett : Marion Crawford's ' Francesca ' (in Pilot, 
June 21). 

G. Stronach : ' Honorificabilitudinitas ' (V.E. ii. 7) (in Notes and 
Queries, June 21) ; Q. V. : same (in same). 

Federn's ' Dante ' (in Saturday Review, July 5). 

Dante Studies (in Pilot, July 26). 

F. C. Kolbe : Dante's Vita Nuova (in Irish Monthly, Aug.). 

J. B. McGovern : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Aug. 9). 

Norton's ' Dante ' (in Times Literary Supplement, Aug. 29). 

Mary B. Whiting : Beata Beatrix (in Temple Bar, Sept.). 

W. F. LoFTHOusE : Dante, Shakespeare, and Wesley (in Wesleyan 
Methodist Magazine, Sept.). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante and the Vita Nuova (in National Home- 
Reading Union Magazine, Oct. 7) ; Introduction to the Divina 
Commedia (in same, Nov. 7) ; P. H. Wicksteed : Dante's Inferno 
(in same, Dec. 8). 

Dante and his Development (in Academy and Literature, Oct. 11). 

The Divine Poet (in Daily Chronicle, Oct. 14). 

D. R. Fearon : Dante's Commedia and Goethe's Faust (in Pilot, 
Oct. 18; Nov. 1). 

In the Steps of Dante and St. Francis (in Daily News, Oct. 21). 

Holbrook's ' Dante and the Animal Kingdom ' (in Daily News, 
Oct. 29). 

The ' Casa Dante ' (in Standard, Nov. 6). 

F. J. Snell : Dante and Zoology (in Speaker, Nov. 15) ; The Life 
and Times of Dante (in same, Nov. 22). 

Dante and his Time (in Morning Post, Nov. 29) ; same (in Pilot, 
Dec. 6). 

H. M. T. : Dante at Ravenna (in Great Thoughts, Dec. 6). 

H. Shillington and R. Garnett : Dante in Siena (read before 
London Dante Society, Dec. 17 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
iii. Lond., 1909). 

C. J. Higginson : Modern Imperialism (Dante's De Monarchia) 
(in Positivist Review, x). 



166 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 902 — continued. 

Max Cowper : water-colour of ' Paolo and Francesca '. (R.A., 
No. 1838.) 

E. Wake Cook : oil painting of ' The Earthly Paradise ' (Purg. 
xxvii-viii). (R.A., No. 954.) 

J. Kelt-Edwards : drawings (12) in black and white (in illustra- 
tion of La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri, yn Gymraeg, by 
Daniel Rees, 1903). 

Louise Rolfe and Phoebe Rees : initial letters (100) in black 
and white (in same work). 

1903 

E. Moore : Studies in Dante. Third series. Miscellaneous Essays. 
(Oxford.) 

Daniel Rees : La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri, yn 
Gymraeg. (Carnarvon.) 

Edward Wilberforce : Dante's Inferno (in terza rima), and other 
Translations. (Lond.) 

E. H. Pember : translation (blank verse) of Purg. xxviii-xxxiii 
(' The Earthly Paradise '). (Not pubhshed.) 

G. A. Greene : Dantesques — A Sonnet Companion to the Inferno. 
(Lond.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : The Convivio of Dante Alighieri. Translated, 
with Notes. (Lond.) 

Sir S. W. Griffith : Draft of a Literal Translation of Dante's 
Inferno, in the Original Metre. (Brisbane, priv. pr.) 

Marcus Dods : Forerunners of Dante. (Edin.) 

H. F. Henderson : The Dream of Dante. An Interpretation of 
the Inferno. (Edin.) 

LuiGi Ricci : The New Life, by Dante Alighieri. Italian Text, with 
English Translation. (Lond.) 

' Dante ' by V. Sardou and E. Moreau, to be presented at Drury 
Lane Theatre by Henry Irving. Some Explanatory Notes by an 
Italian Student. (Lond.) 

Emily Underdown (' Norley Chester ') : Dante and Beatrice. 
A Play founded on incidents in Dante's Vita Nuova. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : Cary's Dante, edited, with Life of Dante and 
Introductory Notes. (Lond., popular ed.) 

J. S, Carroll : Exiles of Eternity. An Exposition of Dante's 
Inferno. (Lond.) 

John Payne : Dante (sonnet) (in Vigil and Vision. Lond.). 

Alix Egerton : Paolo and Francesca (sonnet) (in The Lady of the 
Scarlet Shoes, and other Verses, Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 167 

Daniel Rees and T. Gwynn-Jones : Dante and Beatrice — 
A Play. (Lond.) 

J. P. Briscoe : Dante Treasury. (Nottingham.) 

Paget Toynbee : The Earliest References to Dante in English 
Literature (in Miscellanea di Studi Critici edita in onore di Arturo Graf, 
Bergamo). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante's Inferno (in National Home Reading Union 
Magazine, Jan. 7) ; Dante's Lyrical Poems (in same, Oct. 7). 

Dante's Clock (in Daily Chronicle, Jan. 7). 

T. P. Armstrong : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Jan. 10). 

H. J. Chaytor : Folquet de Marselha {Par. ix. 82 ff.) (read before 
London Dante Society, Jan. 14 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
i. Lond., 1904). 

The Dante Society (in Daily News, Jan. 15) ; same (in Queen, 
March 28). 

Time Allusions in Dante (in Pilot, Jan. 31). 

Jane E. Harrison : Dante's Eunoe and an Orphic Tablet (in 
Classical Review, Feb.). 

P. H. Wicksteed : Dante's De Monorchia (in National Home 
Reading Union Magazine, Feb. 7) ; Dante's Purgatorio (in same, 
March 7) ; The Main Idea of Dante's Purgatory (in same, April 7) ; 
Dante's Ethical System and Doctrine of Love {Purg. xvii, xviii) (in 
same, May 7) ; Dante (in sam£, June 8) ; Dante's De Vulgari Elo- 
quentia, and the first treatise of the Convivio (in same, Nov. 7) ; The 
second treatise of the Convivio ; the episode of the Lady at the 
Window ; and the Meeting of Dante and Beatrice in the Earthly 
Paradise (in same, Dec. 7). 

Holbrook's ' Dante and the Animal Kingdom ' (in Saturday 
Review, Feb. 7). 

Count Plunkett : One of Dante's Illustrators, Pinelli (read before 
London Dante Society, Feb. 11 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
i. Lond., 1904). 

John Chester : The Forthcoming ' Dante ' (in Westminster 
Gazette, Feb. 17) ; W. W. Vernon : same (in same, Feb. 24). 

A Supposed Portrait of Dante discovered in Florence (in IllustrtUed 
London News, Feb. 21). 

J. A. Stewart : The Source of Dante's Eunoe (in Classical Review, 
March). 

Dinsmore's 'Teachings of jyante' (in Journal of Education, March). 

J, Dormer : ' Indigo ' in Dante (in Notes and Queries, March 7) ; 
' Lysart ' : same (in same, April 25). 

John Hebb : Portrait of Dante (in Notes and Queries, March 7) ; 



168 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTp 

1903 — contintied. 

J. Dormer : same (in same, April 4) ; O. O. H. : same (in same) ; 
H. G. Hope : same (in same, June 27) ; S. Wheeler : same (in 
same) ; Anon. : same (in same, Aug. 8). 

Dante and Animals (in Pilot, March 21). 

At Sotheby's (March 24) the Carmichael copy of the 1481 Florence 
edition of the Commedia, with 19 plates, after Botticelli (Lot 270), 
sells for £1,000 (see also under 1912, 1918). In the same sale were 
included a MS. of the De Monarchia (Lot 337), and numerous works 
upon Dante (Lots 266-340). 

P. H. Wicksteed : Recent Dante Literature (in Hibbert Journal) 
April). 

The new Dante Drama (in Era, April 4). 

Sardou and Moreau's ' Dante ' (in Standard, April 11). 

Paget Toynbee : The Identity of ' il Provenzale ' in the Convivio 
(iv. 11) (in Athenaeum, April 18) ; Dante's Message to the Age (in 
Sphere, May 2) ; An Emendation in the text of the Convivio (iv. 22) 
(in Bulletin Italien, July) ; Dante's uses of the word ' Trattato ' in 
the Vita Nuova and Convivio (in Romania, Oct.^ ; English Transla- 
tions from Dante (Cent. XIV-XVII) (in Journal of Comparative 
Literature, Oct.-Dec.) ; Dante's References to Glass (in Giom. Star. 
Lett. Ital., xli). 

Dante as Hero (in Stage, April 28). 

LuiGi Ricci : Beatrice (read before London Dante Society, 
April 29 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, ii. Lond., 1906). 

The play of ' Dante ' (by Sardou and Moreau, translated by 
Laurence Irving), produced by Henry Irving at Drury Lane (April 30), 
with Irving as Dante. 

S. Udny : The Interpretation of Dante (in Contemporary Review, 
May). 

W. H. H. : Dante at Drury Lane (in Pilot, May 9). 

E. Armstrong : Montagues and Capulets {Purg. vi. 106) (in Pilot, 
May 16 ; June 27). 

Gary's ' Dante ' at Sixpence (in Newsagent, May 23). 
Books on Dante (in Spectator, May 2) ; same (in Guardian, June 17). 
Karl Blind : Discovery of New Dante Portraits (in Westminster 
Review, July). 

F. P. Marchant : Geryon {Inf. xvii. 97) (in Notes and Queries, 
Aug. 29). ' St. Swithin ' : same (in same, Sept. 19). 

The Imperialism of Dante (in Church Quarterly Review, Oct.). 
J. S. Carroll : Dante Alighieri (in Bookman, Nov.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 169 

A. W. Verrall : ' To follow the Fisherman '■ — a Historical Problem 
in Dante (in Independent Review, Nov.). 

HoNORA TwYCROSS : Dante Pictures (in Great Thoughts, Nov. 7). 

D. R. Fearon : Dante's Vita Nuova and its Translators (in Pilot, 
Nov. 21). 

H. Morrison : The Deliverance of Dante (in New Liberal Review, 
Dec.). 
R. W. M. : Eschatology and Dante (in Methodist Recorder, Dec. 31). 

E. D. A. Morshead : translation (rhymed couplets) of Eel. i. 27-44 
(' Dante's Refusal ') (in Oxford Magazine, xxi. 113). 

Victor J. Robertson : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca '. 
(R.A., No. 587.) 

Arthur H. Buckland : monochrome of ' Dante and Beatrice in 
Paradise ' (on cover of popular ed. of Gary's Dante, ed. Toynbee). 

John D. Batten : brush drawing in black and white, in illustra- 
tion of Inf. i. 1 ff. (supplementary to series of 1897-1900 ; in posses- 
sion of Mr. Geo. Musgrave at Oxford). 

Simeon Solomon : water-colour of ' The Vision of Dante ' (repro- 
duced in Bookman, Nov.). 

1904 

Lo Purgatorio di Dante Alighieri Fiorentino. (NeUa Stamperia di 
Ashendene ; printed by C. H. St. John Hornby.) 

H. F. Tozer : Dante's Divina Commedia, Translated into English 
Prose. (Oxford.) ^ 

Caroline C. Potter : The Purgatorio and Paradiso of the 
Divina Commedia of Dante, Translated into English Verse (rhymed 
quatrains). (Lond.) 

James Anstie : translation (verse) of Son. x, xxxvi, xxxiv ; 
Ball, vi, V ; Cam. ix, xx ; Son. xlix ; Par. xxxiii. 46-145 (in English 
Echoes- — Horace, Petrarch, Dante, Bournemouth). 

James Williams : Thoughts on Dante. (Birkenhead.) 

J. B. : Daily Thoughts from Dante Alighieri. (Lond.) 

P. H. Wicksteed : The Early Lives of Dante. Translated (Lond.) ; 
The De Monarchia, Epistolae, Eclogae, and Quaestio de Aqua et Teira, 
of Dante Alighieri. Translated, with Notes (in Translation of the 
Latin Works of Dante Alighieri, Lond.). 

A. G. Ferrers Howell : The De Vulgari Eloquentia of Dante 
Alighieri. Translated, with Notes (in same). 

M. A. Wyld : The Dread Inferno. Notes for Beginners in the 
Study of Dante. (Lond.) 

E. Hope Neville: Stanzas onDante (in A Song of Florence, Lond.). 

Maurice Hewlett : ' Dante and the Traveller ' ; ' Dante's 



170 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 904 — continued. 
Picture ' ; ' Beatrice and other Concerns ' (in The Road in Tuscany, 
Lend., 1906). 

E. C. Lowe : La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri, Done into 
English (blank verse) (revised ed.). (Lond. and Ely.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : Syllabus of a Course of Twelve Lectures on 
Dante's Paradiso. Soc. for Univ. Ext. in Liverpool and District. 
(Liverpool.) 

London Dante Society Lectures, i. (Lond.) 

T. H. Wakren : Tennyson and Dante (in Monthly Review, Jan.). 

Steep Stairs and bitter Bread {Par. xvii. 59) (in Macmillan's 
Magazine, Jan.). 

Paget Toynbee : The Earliest Editions of the Divina Commedia 
printed in England (in Athenaeum, Jan. 2) ; ' Sollenare ' in Vita 
Nuova, §§ 12, 40 (in Bulletin Italien, July) ; ' Tisrin Primo ' {V.N., 
§ 30) (in Dai Tempi anlichi ai Tempi moderni : da Dante a Leopardi. 
Milano). 

P. Hv WickstEed : The third and fourth treatises of the Convivio 
(in National Home Reading Union Magazine, Jan. 7). 

Maktin Anstey : Dante's Moral Character (in same, Jan. 7). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante's Paradiso. Introduction (in same, 
Feb. 8) ; The three lower Spheres (in same, March 7) ; The Spheres of 
the four higher Planets (in same, April 7) ; The Stellar and Crystalline 
Heavens (in same, May 7); The Empyrean Heaven (in same. June 7); 
Dante (in Hibbert Journal, Oct.). 

Dante Books (in Athenaeum, Jan. 80). 

E. D. A. MoRSHEAD : translation (Spenserian stanzas) of Purg. 
xxii. 55-112 (' Virgil and Statius ') (in Oxford Magazine, March 2). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, March 6). 

D. R. Fearon : Secrets in Dante's Vita Nuova (in Pilot, March 26). 

W. J. MuLCAHY : A Plea for the Study of Dante (in New Ireland 
Review, April). 

P. M. T. Craigie : The Art of Portraiture— Dante and Goya (read 
before London Dante Society, April 13 ; printed in Dante Society 
Lectures, ii. Lond., 1906). 

Charles Plummer : The Advocatus Diaboli on the Divina 
Commedia (in Quarterly Review, Oct.). 

H. T. Cart : Dante and the Papacy (read before London Dante 
Society, Nov. 16 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, ii. Lond., 1906). 

H. J. Chaytor : Literary Criticism among the Troubadours, and 
its Influence on Dante (in Proceedings of the Literary and Philo- 
sophical Society of Liverpool, Iviii). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 171 

Blanche McManus : outline drawings (13) of ' Incidents in the 
Life of Dante Alighieri ' (printed in colour in A Dante Calendar, 
1904). 

Arthue G. Walker : statuette of ' Dante ' (R.A., No. 1677 ; 
Walker Art Gall., Liverpool, 1904) ; stone statue of ' Dante ' 
(enlarged design of preceding, in niche outside St. Deiniol's Library, 
Hawarden). 

Max Beerbohm : pen-and-ink, tinted with water-colour of ' Dante 
in Oxford ' (caricature). (Carfax Gall., May 1904.) 

1905 

The John Rylands Library acquires by purchase a Cent. XVI MS. 
(imperfect) of the Commedia (MS. Ital. 48). 

Lo Paradiso di Dante Alighieri. (Nella Stamperia di Ashendene ; 
])rinted by C. H. St. John Hornby). 

S. P. Thompson : translation of the Quaestio de Aqua et Terra, in 
facsimile of editio princeps. (Firenze.) 

C. Gordon Wright : The Purgatorio of Dante Alighieri rendered 
into Spenserian English (prose). (Lond.) 

G. G. Coulton : Guelf and GhibeUine. Dante Illustrations from 
the Autobiography of Brother Salimbene of Parma (in Mediaeval 
Studies, Lond.). 

R. P. Downes : Dante (in Seven Supreme Poets, Lond.). 

Christopher Hare : Dante the Wayfarer. (Lond.) 

P. H. Wicksteed : Syllabus of a Course of Twelve Lectures on 
Dante. Camb. Univ. Local Lectures. (Camb.) 

Edward Wilberforce : The Better Waters of Purgatory (read 
before London Dante Society, Jan. 5 ; printed in Dante Society 
Lectures, ii. Lond., 1906). 

W. J. Payling Wright : ' La Lupa Dantesca ' (read before 
London Dante Society, March 1 ; printed in Dante Society Lectures, 
ii. Lend., 1906). 

S. Udny : Dante's Occult Conception of the Soul (in Broad Views, 
April). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante and the Legend of St. John the Evangelist 
(in Bulletin Italien, April) ; The Editio Princeps of the De Aqua et 
Terra (in Athenaeum, July 8) ; English Translations of Dante in the 
Eighteenth Century (in Modern Language Review, Oct.). 

Sir John Hawkins : The use of Dante as an Illustrator of Scrip- 
ture (in Expository Times, June-Oct.) ; Some Helps towards the 
Study of Dante (in same, Dec). 

J. B. McGovern : Danteiana (in Notes and Qtieries, June 24). 



172 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1906 — continued. 

John Hebb : Dante — unknown Portrait (in Notes and Queries, 
Sept. 9) ; Dante's Sonnet to Guido Cavalcanti (in same) ; A. R. 
Bayley : same (in same, Sept. 30) ; John Pickfoed : same (in 
same). 

Howard Candler : The Black- washing of Dante (in Contem- 
porary Review, Oct.). 

E. MooRE : Dante's Theory of Creation (read before Oxford Dante 
Society, Nov. 14 ; printed in Studies in Dante, iv. Oxford, 1917). 

H. S. Verschoyle : Dante's Quest of Liberty (in Hermathena, xiii). 

Lonsdale Ragg : black-and-white drawings (6) of Italian scenes 
connected with Dante (reproduced in the artist's Dante and his Italy, 
1907). 

1905-6 

Herbert B. Garrod: Dante and the Commedia (a course of 
lectures to the Students' Association for North London ; printed in 
Dante, Goethe's Faust, and other Lectures, Lond., 1913). 

1906 

T. Okey and P. H. VVicksteed : The Vita Nuova and Canzoniere 
of Dante AUghieri. Translated, with Notes. (Lond.) 

James Williams : Dante as a Jurist. (Oxford.) 

A. K. Sabin : translation {terza rima) of Purg. xxviii (in The Death 
of Icarus, and other Poems, Glasg.). 

J. S. Carroll : Prisoners of Hope. An Exposition of Dante's 
Purgatorio. (Lond.) 

G. G. CouLTON : From St. Francis to Dante. (Lond.) 

London Dante Society Lectures, ii. (Lond.) 

W. W. Jackson : On the Interpretation of ' Pareglio ' {Par. 
xxvi. 106-8) (in Modern Language Review, Jan.). 

Paget Toynbee : Sheldon and White's ' Concordanza delle 
Opere Italiane in Prosa e del Canzoniere di Dante Alighieri ' (in 
Modern Language Review, Jan.) ; The 1477 Venice Edition of the 
Divina Commedia (in Athenaeum, Jan. 13) ; John Foxe and the 
Editio Princeps of the De Monarchia (in same, April 14) ; Cain and 
the Moon {Inf. xx. 126) (in same, June 23, Nov. 10) ; English Trans- 
lations of Dante's Works (in Bulletin Italien, Oct.) ; Chronological 
List of English Translations from Dante, from Chaucer to the Present 
Day (in Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Cambridge, U.S.A., 
Dante Society). 

E. Armstrong : Dante in Relation to the Sports and Pastimes of 
his Age (in Modern Language Review, April, July). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 173 

W. Barry : Dante and the Spirit of Poetry (in Catholic World, 
May). 

Edward Caird : Dante's Political Ideas (read before Oxford 
Dante Society, May 15). 

.1. F. R. : Dante's Sonnet to Guido Cavalcanti (in Notes and 
Queries, June 16). 

Manchester Dante Society founded (Sept. 13) by Dr. L. C. 
Casartelli, Bishop of Salford. 

[The Society at present (1920) numbers 68 members.] 

W. W. Vernon : The Contrasts in the Divina Commedia (read 
before Manchester Dante Society, Oct. 24 ; printed in Dante and his 
Times, 1917). 

Addison McLeod : Portraits of Dante (in Art Journal, Dec). 

Philip Worman : water-colour of ' Dante's House, Piazza di San 
Martino, Florence '. (R.A., No. 1019.) 

Sir W. B. Richmond : bronze statue of ' Dante ' (one of four 
figures at corners of the Gladstone Memorial in Hawarden Church). 

1907 

Paget Toynbee : In the Footprints of Dante. A Treasury of 
Verse and Prose from the Works of Dante. (Loud.) 

Marie L. Egerton Castle : Dante (in Bell's Miniature Series of 
Poets, Lond.). 

Lonsdale Ragg : Dante and his Italy. (Lond.) 

Marian Edwardes : Dante Alighieri (in Summary of the Literature 
of Modern Europe, Lond.). 

W. L. MuNDAY ; Dante. A Lecture. (Plymouth.) 

T. G. Tucker : Dante (in The Foreign Debt of English Literature, 
Ijond.). 

Paget Toynbee : Boccaccio's Commentary on the Divina Com- 
media (in Modern Language Review, Jan.) ; Dante's ' New Life after 
the Strozzi MS.' (in Athenaeum, Jan. 12) ; An Apocryphal Venice 
Edition of the Divina Commedia (in Bulletin Italien, April) ; A Latin 
Translation of the Divina Commedia quoted in the ' Mysterium 
Iniquitatis '. of Du Plessis Mornay (in same, Oct.); Barbi's Edition of 
the Vita Nuova (in Times Literary Supplement, Oct. 17); ' Dantesque,' 
' Dantist,' &c., in the New English Dictionary (in Athenaeum, 
Nov. 30). 

W. W. Vernon : The Great Italians of the Divina Commedia (read 
before London Dante Society, Jan. 9 ; printed in Dante and his Times^ 
1917). 

A Chinese Dante (in Strand Magazine, Feb.). 



174 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1907 — continued. 

G. G. Napier : Dante on Paolo and Francesca (in Notes and 
Queries, March 28). 

John Hebb : Dante and Arcliitecture (in Notes and Queries, 
April 6). 

LuiGi Ricci : Francesca da Rimini (read before London Dante 
Society, April 24; printed in Dante Society Lectures, iii. Lond., 1909). 

Gertrude Leigh : Dante's Inferno an Autobiography (in 
Quarterly Review, July). 

P. E. Matheson : Character and Citizenship in Dante (in Hibbert 
Journal, July). 

G. Trobridge : Dante as a Nature Poet (in Westtninster Review, 
July) ; The Humorous Side of Dante (in same, Dec). 

Sir Theodore Martin : translation (blank verse) of Inf. v. 70-142 
(' Paolo and Francesca ') (in Blackwood's Magazine, Sept.). 

P. Haythornthwait : Dante and the Union of Italy (in Dublin 
Review, Oct.). 

Lord Sherborne : ' Balzo ' {Purg. iv. 47 ; ix. 50, 68) (in Notes 
and Queries, Oct. 12) ; A. L. Mayhew : same (in same, Sept. 9). 

Douglas Freshfield : The Mountains of Dante (in Alpine Journal, 
Nov.). 

E. H. Pember : On some Verdicts of Dante in the Inferno (in 
Transactions of Royal Society of Literature, Nov.). 

G. O. Onions : wash drawing of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (repro- 
duced in The Quarto, iii. 86). 

1908 

The John Rylands Library acquires by purchase an early Cent. XV 
MS. of the Commedia. 

Hon. W. W. Vernon presents his collection of Dante literature 
to the Athenaeum Club. 

Sir S. W. Griffith : The Inferno of Dante Alighieri literally 
translated into English Verse in the Measure of the Original. (Sydney, 
N.S.W.) 

Frances I. Fraser : The Paradise of Dante Alighieri, Trans- 
lated (blank verse). (Bath.) 

C. H. Montagu-Douglas-Scott : translation (blank verse) of 
Inf. iii (' The Gates of Hell ') (in Exotic Rhymes, Lond., priv. pr.). 

C. S. BoswELL : An Irish Precursor of Dante. (Lond.) 

A. H. Mathew : Francesca di Rimini in Legend and History. 
(Lond.) 

Alice Corkran : Beatrice (in The Romance of Woman's Influence. 
(Lond.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 175 

G. Gordon Wright : translation (blank verse) of the Divina 
Commedia. (Not published.) 

W. H. HuTTON : The Influence of Dante in the Literature of Spain 
(in Modern Latiguage Review, Jan.). 

E. M. FoRSTER : Dante (in Working Men's College Journal, Feb., 
March, April). 

W. A. T. Allen : Dante and Egypt — Proposed Statue at Alexan- 
dria (in Athenaeum, Feb. 29). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante in English Literature, from Chaucer to 
Gary (in Edinburgh Review, April) ; The Inquisition and the Editio 
Princeps of the Vita Nuova (in Modern Language Review, April) ; Biagi's 
edition of the Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (in Times Literary Supple- 
ment, May 7) ; Dante and the Olympic Games (in Times, July 29) ; 
Farinelli's ' Dante e la Francia ' (in Times Lit. Sup., Nov. 19). 

W. E. A. Axon : Dante's British Allusions (in Transactions of 
Royal Society of Literature, June). 

Alfred Austin : Dante's Poetic Conception of Woman (in Fort- 
nightly Review, June). 

B. S. : Dante in Australia (in The Lone Hand, June 1). 

C. B. Heberden : Dante's Lyrical Metres — ^His Theory and 
Practice (in Modern Language Review, July). 

E. Moore : The Almanac of Profacius, c. 1300 — Dante's Almanac 
(in Modern Language Review, July). 

A. W. Verball : Dante on the Baptism of Statins (in Albany 
Review, Aug.). 

Walter Hogg : Dante and the Average Man • (in Westminster 
Review, Oct.). 

Mary W. Smith : Dante and Shakespeare (in Nineteenth Century, 
Oct.). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Oct. 17). 

S. Udny : Dante's Intuition of the Infinite (in Contemporary 
Review, Nov.). 

A Spurious Canto in Dante's Commedia (in Times, Nov. 18); 
Paget Toynbee : same (in same, Nov. 16) ; A. J. Butler : same 
(in same, Nov. 18) ; E. Moore and W. W. Vernon : same (in 
same, Nov. 28). 

W. J. Courthope : Macaulay's Comparison of Dante and Milton 
(in Proceedings of British Academy, Dec. 10, vol. iii). 

1909 

W. W. Jackson : The Convivio of Dante. Translated into EngUsh. 
(Oxford.) 



176 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1909 — continued. 

C. L. Shadwell : Dante. Quaestio de Aqua et Terra. Edited and 
translated. (Oxford.) 

Paget Toynbee : Dante in English Literature, from Chaucer to 
Gary. (Lond., 2 vols.) 

Sir John Hawkins : The use of Dante as an Illustrator of Scrip- 
ture. (Lond.) 

W. H. V. Reade : The Moral System of Dante's Inferno. (Oxford.) 

G. Grinnell-Milne : translation (terza rima) of Inf. v. 70-142 
(' Francesca da Rimini ') (in Tale.^ from Tasso : Poems and Transla- 
tions, Lond.). 

Edward Wilberforce : Dante's Divine Comedy, Translated 
{terza rima). (Lond., 3 vols.) 

H. GuppY : Catalogue of an Exhibition of the Works of Dante 

Alighieri in the John Rylands Library, Manchester. (Manch.) 

[The Library at this date possessed ' five MSS. and nearly 6,000 printed 
' volumes and pamphlets relating to Dante '.] 

London Dante Society Lectures, iii. (Lond.) 

F. J. Snell : Handbook to the Works of Dante. (Lond.) 

J. Edgcumbe Staley : Beatrice de' Portinari di Simone de' Bardi — 

The Type of the New Woman (in Famous Women of Florence,Ijond.). 
John Payne : ' Nessun maggior dolore ' {Inf. v. 121) (in Flower 

o' the Thorn, a Book of Wayside Verse, Lond.). 

L. Miller : Gleanings of Ears and Poppies, chiefly from Dante and 

Chaucer. (Lond.) 

Tutte le Opere di Dante Alighieri, miovamente rivedute net testo e 

diligentemente emendate dal Dr. E. Moore. (Nella Stamperia Ashen- 

deniana.) 

[Printed by C. H. St. John Hornby ; contains six woodcuts by W. H. Hooper, 
after designs by Charles Gere ; and initial letters by Graily Hewitt.] 

W. J. Stewart McKay : translation (prose) of Inf. i-x. (Not 
published.) 

Alfred Austin : Milton and Dante (in Quarterly Review, Jan.). 

H. P. L. : Dante ; Durando ; Durant (in Notes and Queries, 
March 6). 

W. H. Hutton : Dante's Judgement of Eve {Purg. xxix. 26) (in 
Guardian, March 17). A. J. Butler : same (in same, March 31). 
A. S. Wood : same (in same). A. Constable : same (in same). 

Paget Toynbee : Edward Fitzgerald and Dante (in Times, Mar. 27) ; 
The Sepulchres at Pola referred to by Dante {Inf. ix. 112-17) (in 
Modern Language Review, April) ; A Dante Exhibition at Manchester 
(in Times, April 3) ; Dante and the Unity of Italy (in Times Lit. Sup., 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 177 

June 17) ; Wells and Dante (in Times, June 24) ; Byron and Dante 
(in Spectator, July 10) ; The Ashendene Dante (in Times Lit. Sup., 
Aug. 12) ; The Earliest EngUsh Illustrators of Dante (in Quarterly 
Review, Oct.) ; Dante's Convivio or Convito ? (in Athenaeum, Oct. 16). 

Dante in England (in Daily News, May 11) ; same (in Birmingham 
Post, May 26). 

The Pilgrim of Eternity (Dante) (in Clarion, May 21). 

The Literary Appreciation of Dante (in Standard, May 26). 

English Appreciation of Dante (in Guardian, May 26). 
' NoKFOLK ' : Dante on Old Men (in Notes and Queries, June 5). 

Dante and his Translators (in Spectator, June 26). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante and England (in Daily Chronicle, June 28). 
R. Hayes : Dante as a Religious Teacher (in Irish Church 

Quarterly, July). 

Dante's Extraordinary Influence (in Public Opinion, Sept. 10). 

J. B. McGovERN : Dante MSS. (in Notes and Queries, Dec. 4). 

Roger E. Fry : five designs from Dante, in gouache, on silk — 
' The Gate of the Inferno ' ; ' Geryon ' ; ' The Souls arriving at the 
Mount of Purgatory ' ; ' The Valley of the Kings ' ; ' Dante's last 
Night in Purgatory.' (Carfax Gall., April.) 

Charles Ricketts : bronze relief of ' Paolo and Francesca in the 
Inferno '. (Grafton Gall.) 

F. Derwent Wood : plaster group of ' Paolo and Francesca '. 
(Grafton Gall.) 

G. Wilson Nesbit : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca ' (Inf. 
V. 74-5). (R.A., No. 318.) 

Florence Parkinson : water-colour of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 
1220). 

Charles M. Gere : drawings (6) in illustration of the Ashendene 
Dante (engraved on wood by W. H. Hooper). 

c. 1910 
Esther Felicia Fry : translation (verse) of Son. i {V.N., § 3) ; 
Son. vii (V.N. § 14) (not published). 

1910 

W. M. Rossetti : Dante and his Convito. A Study, with Trans- 
lations. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : Dante Alighieri — His Life and Works. (Lond.) 

A. L. Money : The Purgatory of Dante Alighieri, Rendered into 
English (blank) Verse. (Lond.) 

R. W. Chambers : Catalogue of the Dante Collection in the Library 
of University College, London. (Oxford.) 

N 



178 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1910 — continiied. 

Marie L. Egerton Castle : Gary's Dante, revised, with Intro- 
duction, Chronological View of the Age of Dante, and Notes. (Lond.) 

H. F. Henderson : With Dante on the Mountain — A Guide 
through the Circles of the Purgatorio. 

A. J. Butler : Dante (in Encyclopaedia Britannica, eleventh ed., 
vol. vii) ; Dante and the Renaissance (in New Quarterly, Feb.) ; The 
Forerunners of Dante — A Selection from Italian Poetry before 1300. 
(Oxford.) 

Paget Toynbee : Grandgent's edition of the Inferno (in Modern 
Language Review, Jan.) ; Dante and the Apparent Diameter of the 
Sun (in Times, Jan. 31) ; Dante's Ballata, ' Per una ghirlandetta ' 
(in Bulletin Italien, April) ; Joseph Hume and Dante (in Westminster 
Gazette, July 28) ; South Africa and Dante (a MS. of the Commedia 
at Cape Town) (in Times, Nov. 10). 

Dante's Influence in English Literature (in Western Independent, 
Jan. 23). 

J. M. Ballantyne : Was Dante a Doctor ? (in British Medical 
Journal, Feb. 5, 12) ; Dante's Knowledge of Aristotle's De Genera- 
tione (in same, Aug. 13). 

H. Candler : The Symbolic Use of Number in the Divina Com- 
media (in Transactions of Royal Society of Literature, April). 

Dante as a Sorcerer (in Times, May 28) ; Paget Toynbee : same 
(in same. May 31). 

E. Moore : A Proposed Emendation in Epist. vi. 169 (in Modern 
Language Review, July). 

A. Cossio : The Landi Dante Codex at Manchester (in Antiquary, 
July) ; J. B. McGovERN : same (in same, Aug.). 

' MiNiME ' : John Rylands Library. Dante Codex (in Notes and 
Queries, July 7) ; J. B. McGovern : same (in same, Aug. 27, Oct. 8). 

J. B. McGovern : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, July 30) ; 
Some Precursors of Dante (in Antiquary, Nov., Dec). 

C. H. Herford : Dante's Theory of Poetry (in Quarterly Review, 
Oct.). 

A. Warren : Dante's Tomb at Ravenna (in Saturday Review, 
Oct. 10). 

G. S. W. : Dante, Ruskin, and a Font (in Notes and Queries, 
Dec. 10). 

B. Smythe : Notes on Dante's Education (in Oxford and Cambridge 
Review, No. 12). 

G. P. Jacomb-Hood : oil painting of ' Paolo and Francesca '. 
<R.A., No. 667.) 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 179 

Evelyn Paul : water-colours (6) of subjects from Dante (repro- 
duced in colour in S. Cunnington's Stories from Dante). 

F. Derwent Wood : bronze group of ' Paolo and Francesca in 
the Inferno ' (exh. at International Exh. of Fine Arts at Rome in 1911). 

1911 

J. W. Mackail : The Divine Comedy (in Lectures on Poetry, 
Lond.). 

C. E. Wheeler : Dante Alighieri — The Divine Comedy, Translated 
(ierza rivia). (Lond., 3 vols.) 

Sir S. W. Griffith : The Divina Commedia of Dante Alighieri, 
Literally translated into English Verse in the Hendecasyllabic 
Measure of the Original Italian. (Lond.) 

J. S. Carroll : In Patria. An Exposition of Dante's Paradiso. 
(Lond.) 

H, L. G. Kennedy : Paolo and Francesca (in Verses, Guildford). 

J. B. McGovERN : Some Precursors of Dante (in Antiquary, Jan.) ; 
Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, June 17). 

A. R. Bayley : Dante, Ruskin, and a Font (in Notes and Queries, 
Jan. 7). 

Paget Toynbee : ' Tarteron White ' and Tartar Cloths {Inf. 
xvii. 16-17) (in Times, March 31) ; Dante and the Badia di Firenze 
(in Bulletin Italien, April) ; Gibbon and Dante (in Modern Language 
Review, April, Oct.) ; Dante's Arrangement of the Celestial Hier- 
archies in the Convivio (in Bull. Soc. DatU. Ital., N.S. xviii, Sept.) ; 
The Divina Commedia in English and French (in Times, Sept. 11) ; 
Scherillo's edition of the Vita Nuova (in Modern Language Review, 
Oct.) ; Holbrook's ' Portraits of Dante ' (in Times Lit. Sup., Nov. 2). 

W. E. A. Axon : Lockhart on Dante (in Notes and Queries, April 1). 

A. E. Beilby : The Secret of Dante (in New-Church Magazine, 
June). 

S. Udny : Dante and the New Theology (in Hibbert Journal^ 
July). 

M. L. R. Breslar : Spenser and Dante (in Notes and Queries, 
Dec. 2) ; T. Bayne : same (in same, Dec. 23) ; A. R. Bayley : 
same (in same). 

A. Broadbent : marble head of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 1844.) 

1911-12 

W. Matthews : water-colours (8), reproduced in colour, as 
illustrations of 'Paolo and Francesca', in The World's Romances, 
1912. 

n2 



180 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1912 

George Saintsbury : Dante and the Grand Style (in Essays and 
Studies by Members of the English Association, iii. Oxford.) 

E. G. Gardner : Joachim of Flora {Par. xii. 140-1) and the 
Everlasting Gospel (in Franciscan Essays, Aberdeen.) 

Mary E. Lacy : With Dante in Modern Florence. (Lond.) 

A. G. Ferrers Howell : Dante^ — His Life and Work. (Lond.) 

J. A. Brendon: Dante and Beatrice (in Twelve Great Passions, 
Lend.). 

E. V. Lucas : The Badia and Dante (in A Wanderer in Florence, 
Lond.). 

Eva Gore Booth : ' Divina Commedia ' (poem) (in The Agate 
Lamp, Lond.). 

Mrs. C. Grant : Through Dante's Land. (Lond.) 

Robert Bridges, in La Gloire de Voltaire, in which Voltaire and 
Dante, ' the Frenchman and the Florentine ', are contrasted, intro- 
duces reminiscence of Inf. v. 100, and paraphrase of Inf. vii. 118-24 
(in Poetical Works, Oxford, 1913, pp. 379, 381). 

Paget Toynbee : The Vatican Text of the Letters of Dante (in 
Modern Language Review, Jan.) ; ' Anubis ' or ' a nubibus ' in Dante's 
Letter to Henry VII (in Bulletin Italien, Jan.) ; Diminutive Editions 
of the Divina Commedia (in Times, Feb. 5) ; Hauvette's ' Introduc- 
tion a rfitude de la Divine Comedie ' (in Times Lit. Sup., Feb. 29) ; 
The S. Pantaleo Text of Dante's Letters to the Emperor Henry VII 
and to the Princes and Peoples of Italy (in Modern Language Review, 
April) ; The Centenary of the Completion of Cary's Dante (in same, 
July) ; Grandgent's edition of the Purgatorio (in same) ; The Venetian 
Text of Dante's Letter to the Emperor Henry VII (in same, Oct.) ; 
An unrecorded Seventeenth Century Version of the Vita di Dante 
of Leonardo Bruni (in Tweniy-ninth Annual Report of the Cambridge, 
U.S.A., Dante Society) ; Chronological List, with Notes, of Paintings 
and Drawings from Dante, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti (in Scritti 
Varii di Erudizione e di Critica in Onore di Rodolfo Renier, Torino) ; 
Dante's Convivio in some Italian Writers of the Cinquecento, and 
incidentally of the Title of the Treatise (in Studii Dedicati a Francesco 
Torraca, Napoli). 

Ida Langdon : Spenser and Dante (in Notes and Queries, Jan. 18). 

Frederic Harrison : Poets that I love (in ' Among my Books ', 
in English Review, Feb.). 

J. Foster : Dante on the Theological Virtues (in Holborn Record, 
April). 

E. G. Gardner : The Mystical Aspect of Dante's Vita Nuova (in 
The Quest, April). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 181 

W. BuTTERWORTH : D. G. Rossetti in relation to Dante Alighieri 
(in Manchester Quarterly, April). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, May 25 ; 
Oct. 26) ; L. L. K. : same (in same, June 1). 

The Huth Sale — Record Price for a Dante (in Times, June 12). 

[The ' record ' is the price of £1,800 paid by Quaritch at Sotheby's on 
June 11 for a copy of the 1481 Florence ed. of the Commedia, with 19 
engravings after the designs of Botticelli (see also under 1903, 1918). At 
the same sale a copy of the 1472 Foligno ed. fetched £475 ; a copy of the 
1472 Jesi ed., £680 ; and a copy of the 1487 Florence ed., £130.] 

George Morrow : line drawing of ' Portrait of Dante ' (zincotyped 
as frontispiece to Ferrers Howell's Dante : His Life and Work). 

Leonard Jennings : marble group of ' Paolo and Francesca '. 
(R.A., No. 1796.) 

Cinematograph of ' Scenes from the Inferno '. 

1913 

E. G. Gardner : Dante and the Mystics. (Lond.) 

M. A. Orr (Mrs. John Evershed) : Dante and the Early Astrono- 
mers. (Lond.) 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : Dante and Aquinas. (Lond.) 

Paget Toynbee : Index of Authors quoted by Boccaccio in his 
Comento sopra la Commedia (in Studi su Giovanni Boccaccio, per il 
VI Centenario della nascita di Gio. Boccaccio, Castelfiorentino). 

Gauntlett Chaplin : Dante for the People^ — Selected Passages 
from the Divine Comedy in English (blank) Verse. (Lond.) 

Alice Birkhead : Dante the Divine Poet (in Heroes of Modern 
Europe, Lond.). 

Herbert B. Garrod : Dante, Goethe's Faust, and other Lectures. 
(Lond.) 

Sir W. M. Ramsay : The Imperial Peace, an Ideal in European 
History (Dante's De Monarchia). (Romanes Lecture, Oxford.) 

Maurice Hewlett : ' Quel giorno piu non vi leggemmo avante ' 
{Inf. V. 138) ; ' Beatrix ' (in Helen Redeeined, and other Poems, 
Lond.). 

E. H. Holthou6>e : Dante and Ben Sira — A Comparison (in 
Church Quarterly Review, Jan.). 

Lonsdale Ragg : Wit and Humour in Dante (in Modern Language 
Review, Jan.). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante's Remarks on Translation m the Convivio 
(in Mod. Lang. Rev., Jan.) ; A Misreading in Dante's Letter to 
a Friend in Florence (in Bull. Soc. Dani. Ital., N. S. xx, March) ; 
Jonathan Richardson and Portraits of Dante (in Mod. Lang. Rev., 



182 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1913 — continued. 
April) ; Dante and Plagiarism (in Times, June 7) ; Oriental Fabrics 
in Italy in the Time of Dante (in Times, July 2) ; Dante and Halley's 
Comet (in Times, Dec. 81) ; A Note on Storia, Storiato, and the 
corresponding terms in French and English, in illustration of Purg. 
X. 52, 71, 78 (in Melanges offeris a M. Emile Picot par ses Amis el ses 
Sieves, Paris). 

Rand and Wilkins's ' Dantis Alagherii Operum Latinorum Con- 
cordantiae ' (in Cambridge Review, Jan. 16) ; Paget Toynbee : 
same (in Mod. Lang. Rev., April). 

G. C. Rawlinson : Dante the Mystic (in The Treasury, May). 

Oriel College, Oxford, receives by gift from Miss Church the Dante 
collection of the late Dean Church (May). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, June 14) ; 
The Popes of the Divina Commedia (in Antiquary, Aug., Oct., Nov., 
Dec). 

F. W. Buckler : Dante and Italian Nationality (in Madras 
Christian College Magazine, Oct.). 

1914 

Paget Toynbee : Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and 
Notable Matters in the Works of Dante. (Oxford.) 

W. Boyd Carpenter : The Spiritual Message of Dante. (Lond.) 

Sir S. W. Griffith : The Poems of the Vita Nuova of Dante 
Alighieri, Literally translated into English Verse in the Metre of the 
Original Italian. (Brisbane.) 

Marion S. Bainbrigge : A Walk in Other Worlds with Dante, 
(Lond.) 

Edith M. Shaw : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri Trans- 
lated (blank verse). (Lond.) 

W. E. a. Axon : The Birthplace of Dante (sonnet) (in The Axon 
Treasury, Stockport). 

Arthur Lynch : Francesca da Rimini (in Sonnets of the Banner 
and the Star, Lond.). 

D. Lloyd Roberts : The Scientific Knowledge of Dante. (Man- 
chester, priv. pr.) 

C. B. Heberden : translation of the De Vulgari Eloqvsntia (not 
published). 

J. B. McGovERN : John Taaffe as a Dantist (in Irish Book Lover, 
Jan.) ; Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Aug. 26). 

Paget Toynbee : Grandgent's edition of the Paradiso (in Mod. 
Lang. Bev., Jan.) ; Milton and MSS. of Dante (in Times, Jan. 31) ; 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 188 

T)ie Editio Princeps of the De Aqua et Terra (in Athenaeum, June 27) ; 
The S. Pantaleo Italian Translation of Dante's Letter to the Emperor 
Henry VII (in Mod. Lang. Rev., July). 

H. M. Beatty : A Century of Gary's Dante (in Studie.i, March). 

E. Moore : The Battifolle Letters attributed to Dante' (in Mod. 
Lang. Rev., April). 

S. Udny : Dante's Mysticism (in Contemporary Review, April). 

A. C. Bradley : Dante's Influence on Shelley's ' Triumph of Life ' 
(in ' Notes on Shelley's Triumph of Life ', in Mod. Lang. Rev., Oct.). 

1915 

C. L. Shadwell : The Paradise of Dante Alighieri — An Experi- 
ment in Literal Verse Translation. With Introduction by J. W. 
Mackail. (Lond.) 

A. E. Beilby : Two Other World Explorers — Dante and Sweden- 
borg. (Lond.) 

Lord Curzon of Kedleston: translation (rhymed quatrains) of 
Inf. V. 25-142 (' The Second Circle : Paolo and Francesca ') (in 
War Poems, and other Translations, Lond.). 

Henry Cart de Lafoxtaine : Dante and War ; De Monarchia ; 
the Convito. (Lond.) 

E. J. Edwardes : The Journey of Dante. Part i. Hell. Trans- 
lated (blank verse) and the Text Examined. (Lond.) 

L. E. WiLLocK : The Four Cardinal Virtues in Dante. (Lond.) 

The British Museum receives (Jan.), by gift from Dr. Paget 
Toynbee, MSS. of unpublished English translations of Dante, by 
Abraham Heraud {Inferno, in terza rima), and William Charteris 
{Commedia, in irregular verse). 

Paget Toynbee : Dante's Letter to the Emperor Henry VII. 
Critical Text (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Jan.) ; Dante's Letter to the 
Princes and Peoples of Italy. Critical Text (in same, April). 

E. B. Storr : Dante's Conception of Hell (in Holborn Review, 
April). 

J. B. McGovern : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Nov. 6). 

Louis Dyer : Dante and Aristotle's De Bona Fortuna (in Thirty- 
second Annual Report of the Cambridge, U.S.A., Dante Society). 

Evelyn Paul : water-colour (17) and outline (14) drawings, in 
illustration of The New Life, by Dante Alighieri. Translated by 
D. G. Rossetti (reproduced in colour, and sepia). 

1916 
W. H. V. Reade : The Political Theory of Dante (in Dante's De 
Monarchia, with Introduction, Oxford). 



184 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1916 — continued. 

I. J. PosTGATE : Corona Stellata — ^Thoughts from Dante's Vision. 
(Lond.) 

W. Boyd Carpenter : Dante's Appeal to Nations. (Lond.) 

H. J. Hooper : translation (' amphiambics ') of the Purgatorio 
(not published). 

Paget Toynbee : The Laurentian Text of Dante's Letter to a 
Friend in Florence (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Jan.) ; H. Johnson's 'Transla- 
tion of the Divina Commedia ' (in Times Lit. Sup., June 29) ; Dr, 
Edward Moore as Dante Scholar (in Times, Sept. 5) ; On the meaning 
of Almus in Dante (in Mod. Lang. Bev., July, Oct.) ; Dr. Moore's 
Fourth Series of ' Studies in Dante ' (in Times Lit. Sup., Oct. 5). 

P. H. WiCKSTEED : On the disputed reading in Dante's Epist. 
V. 129-30 (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Jan.) ; Paget Toynbee : same (in 
same). 

M. J. Summers : Dante and Poliziano (in Notes and Queries, 
Jan. 1). 

The Bodleian Library receives (June) donation of 350 volumes of 
editions of the works of Dante from Dr. Paget Toynbee ; and (Sept.), 
by bequest from Dr. Edward Moore, two Cent. XV Dante MSS., 
one of the Commedia, and one of the Convivio. 

[The Commedia MS. is that designated Z in Dr. Moore's Contributions to 
the Textual Criticism of the B.C., pp. 550-2 ; the Convivio MS. is that 
designated M in his Studies in Dante, iv. 130-1.] 

Queen's College, Oxford, receives (Sept.), by bequest from 
Dr. Edward Moore, his collection of Dante books. 

J. B. McGlovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Dec. 16). 

M. Lawson : water-colours (3) in illustration of the Divina Com- 
media (reproduced in colour in Postgate's Corona Stellata). 

William Brodie : medallion of ' Dante and Beatrice '. (R.S.A., 
No. 40.) 

Charles Ricketts : drawing of ' Dante at the door of the tomb 
of Pope Anastasio ' (Inf. xi. 7-9) (reproduced as illustration of The 
Book of Italy, ed, R. Piccoli, Lond.). 

1917 

E. Moore : Studies in Dante. Fourth Series. Textual Criticism 
of the ConDicto, and Miscellaneous Essays. (Oxford.) 

W. W. Vernon : Lectures on Dante and his Times. (Lend., 
priv. pr.) 

Bernard C, de B. White : Dante in the Badia at Florence (in 
Remembrances, and other Verses, Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 185 

C. L. Barnes : Parallels in Dante and Milton (in Manchester 
Quarterly, Jan.). 

Paget Toynbee : Arthur John Butler as Dante Scholar (in 
Memoir, by A. Quiller-Couch, Lond. ) ; The Laurentian Text of Dante's 
Letter to a Pistojan Exile (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Jan., July) ; The 
Canzoniere of Dante (in Times Lit. Sup., March 22) ; Dante's Letter 
to the Florentines. Emended Text and Translation (in Mod. Lang. 
Rev., April) ; The BattifoUe Letters attributed to Dante (in sarm, 
July) ; Barbi's ' Studi sul Canzoniere di Dante ' (in same) ; Por- 
traits of Dante (in Bodleian Qtmrterly Record, July) ; Grandgent's 
' Ladies of Dante's Lyrics ' (in Times Lit. Sup., Nov. 29). 

W. Boyd Carpenter : Dante and Boethius (in Transactions of 
Royal Society of Literature, xxv). 

The Bodleian Library receives (June) donation of busts, masks, 
and portraits of Dante, and about 600 volumes of editions, com- 
mentaries, and translations of the works of Dante, from Dr. Paget 
Toynbee. 

1918 

Laurie Magnus : The Age of Dante (in General Sketch of European 
Literature, Lond.). 

C. L. Barnes : Curiosities in the Divina Commedia (in Manchester 
Quarterly, Jan.). 

A Portrait of Dante at Ravenna (in Times, Jan. 4). 

H. O. : Dante — a newly discovered Portrait (m Notes and Queries, 
Feb.). 

At Christie's (March 19) the Fairfax Murray copy of the 1481 
Florence ed. of the Commedia, with 19 plates after Botticelli (Lot 213), 
sold for £660 (see also under 1903, 1912). 

Paget Toynbee : The Laurentian Text of Dante's Letter to the 
Italian Cardinals (in Mod. Lang. Rev., April) ; Livi's ' Dante — suoi 
Primi Cultori, sua Gente, in Bologna ' (in Times Lit. Sup., May 2) ; 
Langdon's ' Translation of the Inferno ' (in saiTie, June 18) ; English 
Translations of Dante (in same, June 20) ; A Mispunctuation in the 
title of Dante's Letter to the Emperor Henry VII (in Bulletin lialien, 
July) ; Barbera's ' De Monorchia e De Vulgari Eloquentia, con le 
Epistole e la Quaestio de Aqua et Terra, di Dante Alighieri ' (in Mod. 
Lang. Rev., July) ; Dante and the Cursus — a New Argument in 
favour of the Authenticity of the Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (in same, 
Oct.) ; A New MS. of Dante's De Vulgari Eloquentia (in Times Lit. 
Sup., Oct. 10) ; Dante in English Art (in same) ; Misciatelli's ' Amore 
di Dante per Pietra ' (in same, Oct. 17) ; The New Dante MS. (in 
same, Oct. 31). 



186 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1918 — contimied. 
In the sale at Sotheby's (June 11) of MSS. and printed books 
belonging to Lord Vernon were included two Cent. XV MSS. of the 
Divina Commedia (£220, £210), two Cent. XV MSS. (one illuminated) 
of the Inferno (£250, £32), a Cent. XV MS. of Italian commentaries 
on the Commedia (£38), and a Cent. XVI MS. of Marsilio Ficino's 
Italian translation of the De Monarchia (£29), besides more than thirty 
rare Cent. XV and Cent. XVI printed editions of the Commedia. 

Dante Drawings by Blake in the Ashmolean (in Oxford Magazine, 
June 21). 

Langdon's translation of the Inferno (in Times Lit. Sup., June 13); 
same (in Oxford Magazine, June 21) ; same in Contemporary Review, 
Sept.). 

W. P. Ker : ' De Superbia Carminum ' (Dant. V.E. ii. 5, 1. 51) 
(in Mod. Lang. Rev., July). 

E. G. Gardner : Grandgent's ' Ladies of Dante's Lyrics ' ; 
Fletcher's ' Dante ' ; Fisher's ' Mystic Vision in the Grail Legend 
and in the Divina Commedia ' (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Oct.) 

Stephen Philpot's opera of ' Dante and Beatrice ' first performed 
(at the Prince of Wales Theatre, Birmingham, Oct.). 

G. G. L. : Dante and the Dunciad (in Notes and Queries, Nov.) ; 
Constance Russell: same (in same, Dec). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, Dec). 

J. NicKLiN : Dante's Latin Works (in Notes and Queries, Dec). 

Lonsdale Ragg : Dante and a League of Nations (in Anglo- 
Italian Review, Dec). 

Herbert Baynes : Oriental Characteristics in the Divina Com- 
media (in Tratisactions of Royal Society of Literature, xxxvi). 

Isaac Sharp : translation (irregular verse) of Inf. i (not published). 

H. J. Hooper : translation (' amphiambics ') of the' Inferno (not 
published). 

Sidney H. Meteyard : water-colour frontispiece and title-page 
for MS. Dante. (R.A., No. 1290.) 

Christine Gregory : bust of ' Beatrice '. (R.A., No. 1581.) 

1919 

Elizabeth Wordsworth : Dante and Goethe (in Essays Old and 
New, Oxford). 

H. B. Cotterill: Italy from Dante to Tasso (1300-1600). (Lond.) 

Arthur Lynch : Dante (in Moments of Genius, Lond.). 

Isabel C. Clarke : ' La Decenne Sete ' (Purg. xxxii. 2) (in Pathway 
of Dreams, and other Poems, Lond.). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 187 

Paget Toyxbee : Dante's Letter to the Italian Cardinals {Epist. 
viii. 160) (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Jan.) ; Giannozzo Manetti, Leonardo 
Bruni, and Dante's Letter to the Florentines (in sa7ne) ; The New MS. 
of Dante's De Vulgari Eloquentia (in Times Lit. Sup., Feb. 27, 
June 26) ; Barbera's ' Tutte le Opere di Dante Alighieri ' (in same, 
Feb. 27) ; Dante's Letter to Can Grande (Epist. x) (in Mod. Lang. 
Rev., July) ; The New Dante MS. (in Times Lit. Sup., Oct. 23) ; 
The Provenance of the New Dante MS. (in same, Nov. 13) ; W. W. 
Vernon as Dantist (in Times, Nov. 14) ; Bertalot's ' Dantis Alagherii 
De Vulgari Eloquentia et De Monarchia (in Tivies Lit. Sup., Nov. 20) ; 
History of the Letters of Dante, from the Fourteenth Century to the 
Present Day (in Thirty-sixth Annual Report oftlie Cambridge, U.S.A., 
Dante Society). 

Hugh S. Gladstone : Gladstone on Dante (in Notes and Queries, 
May). 

In the sale at Sotheby's (June 26) of MSS. belonging to the late 
Sir Thomas Phillipps was included a Cent. XV MS. of the Canzoniere 
of Dante, with the Trionfi of Petrarch (£29). 

T. W. Arnold : D. Miguel Asin Palacios' ' La Escatologia Musul- 
mana en la Divina Comedia ' (in Mod. Lang. Rev., Oct.). 

A Dante Difficulty {Par. ix. 54) (in Times Lit. Sup., Dec. 25). 

Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale : water-colour of ' The Meeting 
of Dante and Beatrice ' {V.N., § 2) (reproduced in colour in the 
artist's Golden Book of Famous Women, Lond.). 

1920 

Paget Toynbee : Dantis Alagherii EpisioUie. The Letters of 
Dante, Emended Text, with Introduction, Translation, Notes, and 
Indices and Appendix on the Cursus. (Oxford) ; The Oxford Dante 
Society. A Record of Forty-four Years (1876-1920). (Oxford, 
priv. pr.) 

T. S. Eliot : Dante (in The Sacred Wood : Essays on Poetry, 
Lond.). 

Frederic Harrison : Dante (in The New Calendar of Great Men, 

Lond.). 

[Dante, as the representative of Modem Epic Poetry, gives his name to 
the Eighth Montli.] 

Paget Toynbee : A Dante Difficulty {Par. ix. 54) (in Times Lit. 
Sup., Jan. 1) ; The Dante MSS. presented to the University of 
Oxford by Duke Humphrey (in same, March 18) ; Duke Humphrey's 
Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio MSS. (in same, April 22) ; An 
Alleged Note by Boccaccio on Lnf. xix. 13-21 (in Mod. Lang. Rev., 



188 BRITAIN'S TRIBUTE TO DANTE 

1 920 — continued. 
July) ; ' Alcuno ' in the sense of ' nessuno ' in Dante and other 
Mediaeval Writers (in Etudes Italiennes, July) ; ' La Escatologia 
Musulmana en la Divina Comedia ' (in Times Lit. Sup., July 8) ; 
' II Dante del Centenario ' (in same, July 29) ; The First Australian 
Translator of Dante (in Times, Aug. 14) : Dante in Japan (in Times 
Lit. Sup., Sept. 2) ; New Dante MSS. (in same, Nov. 11) ; The 
undescribed MS. of the Divina Commedia (in same, Dec. 9) ; Dante 
in English Art : A Chronological Record of Representations by 
English Artists of Subjects from the Works of Dante, or connected 
with Dante (in Thirty-eighth Annual Report of the Cambridge, U.S.A., 
Dante Society). 

J. B. McGovERN : Danteiana (in Notes and Queries, March). 

T. S. E. : H. D. Sidgwick's ' Dante ' (in Athenaeum, April 2). 

Gertrude Leigh : Dante and the History of Mohammed (in 
Notes and Queries, April 24). 

H. H. E. Craster : Duke Humphrey's Dante, Petrarch, and 
Boccaccio MSS. (in Times Lit. Sup., May 13). 

T. P. Armstrong : Danteiana (Purg. v. 133-€) (in Notes and 
Queries, May 22). 

Stephen Wheeler : Landor and Dante (in Times Lit. Sup., 
May 27). 

The newly-discovered Portrait of Dante at Ravenna (in Illustrated 
London News, June 19). 

The Predominance of Dante (in New Statesman, June 26). 

D. Miguel Asin Palacios' ' La Escatologia Musulmana en la Divina 
Comedia ' (in Times Lit. Sup., July 1) ; Thomas Okey : same 
(in same, July 15). 

London University and the Dante Sexcentenary (in Times, 
July 9). 

At a sale of MSS. at Sotheby's (July 13) an early Cent. XV illumi- 
nated MS. of the Divina Commedia belonging to Lord Mostyn, sold 
for £1,500. 

Dante Celebrations (in Near East, July 15). 

Dante (in Irish Independent, July 16). 

Dante Sexcentenary (in Daily Telegraph, July 20) ; same (in 
Huddersfield Examiner, Sept. 14). 

Grandgent's ' Power of Dante ' (in Yorkshire Post, July 24) ; 
. same (in Yorkshire Post Weekly, July 24) ; same (in Scotsman, 
Sept. 16). 

C. Marriott : Blake's Illustrations to Dante at the Tate Gallery 
(in Outlook, JiUy 24). 



IN LITERATURE AND ART 189 

The Manchester Dante Society and the Restoration of San Fran- 
cesco at Ravenna (in Manchester Guardian, July 26). 

Dinsmore's ' Life of Dante ' (in Manchester Guardian, July 27). 

Dante trans-Indus (in Times of India, Aug. 4). 

A. W. TiLBY : The Dante Celebrations (in Outhok, Aug. 14) ; 
J. B. McGovERN : same (in Manchester Guardian, Aug. 19). 

Sir S. W. Griflfith as Translator of Dante (in British Atistralasian, 
Aug. 19). 

Dante and Westminster Abbey (in Times, Sept. 1,3). 

Dante in Australia (in Book-Post, Sept. 3). 

Walford Davies : Fantasy for tenor solo, chorus, and orchestra 
(from Purg. xx. 127-38 ; xxi. 67-9), performed at Worcester Festival 
(Sept. 8). 

Dante's Master (in Tablet, Sept. 11) ; G. M. Cullen : same (in 
same, Sept. 18). 

' Dante Year ' in Italy (in Times, Sept. 16) ; same (in Daily 
Chronicle, Sept. 18). 

Dante (in Daily Telegraph, Sept. 18). 

H. M. Beatty : The word ' State ' (Dante's use of ' status ' and 
' stato ') (in Times Lit. Sup., Sept. 23). 

The Mind of Dante (in Bookman, Oct.). 

Croce and the Dante Celebrations (in Times Lit. Sup., Oct. 7). 

Dante and the Middle Ages (in Times Lit. Sup., Oct. 28). 

Dante's Ideal Monarchy (in Oxford Chronicle, Oct. 29). 

The Six-hundredth Anniversary of the Death of Dante (in ' Italy's 
two Celebrations ', in May fair, Nov.). 

H. St. John Brooks : Michelangelo and Dante (in Notes and 
Queries, Nov. 13). 

Mrs. E. V. Murray's ' Translation of the Inferno ' (in Spectator, 
Nov. 13). 

Catherine M. Phillimore : The New Dante MS. (in Times Lit. 
Sup., Nov. 25). 

P. F. W. Ryan : Dante as Poet and Politician (in John o' London's 
Weekly, Nov. 27). 

E. G. Gardner : Dante as Literary Critic (in Tablet, Dec. 11). 

Dante Centenary Celebrations (in Evening Standard, Dec. 13). 

Stephen Phiupot : Opera of ' Dante and Beatrice ' (performed 
by Carl Rosa Company at Covent Garden, Dec. 17). 

' Dante and Beatrice ' — Stephen Philpot's Opera {Times, Dec. 18). 

Translation (verse) of Purg. xxx. 67-99 (' Dante and Beatrice ') (in 
Common Sense, Dec. 25). 

Dante on the Film (in Tiines, Dec. 30). 



ADDENDA 

c. 1518 

In fragment of an unidentified Itinerary through France, Italy, and 

Flanders, printed (probably) by R. Pynson, under Rauenna is the 

entry : ' There is buryed saynt Vytall in a welle & many martyrs. 

There is Dantes y» poete Florgtine buried.' 

fThe earliest reference to Dante's tomb at Ravenna. The fragment is 
preserved in the Cambridge University Library. I am indebted to 
Mr. Charles Sayle for drawing my attention to it, and for the transcript 
of the above passage.] 

1799 

Francis Gladwin, in The Persian Moonshee, introduces two 

anecdotes of Dante (ed. 1840, in vol. i, pp. 151, 162). 

[The first is Poggio's story of the trick played upon Dante at the court of 
Can Grande (see Toynbee, Life of Dante, ed. 1910, p. 146) ; the second is 
Sercambi's anecdote of Dante and King Robert of Naples {op. cit., pp. 
152-4).] 

1815 

Keats (as is probable), in line 7 of his sonnet ' On first looking into 

Chapman's Homer ', introduces, through the medium of Cary's 

translation, reminiscence of Par. xix. 64. 

[For the line as it now stands Keats originally wrote, ' Yet could I never 
tell what men could mean.'] 

1838 
John Edmund Reade, in Italy, a Poem in Six Cantos, devotes 
st. 52-55 of canto i, and several pages of notes, to Dante. 

1839 
William Makepeace Thackeray, in ' On the French School of 
Painting ', in The Paris Sketch Book, among grim ' specimens of the 
sublime ' in the Luxembourg, instances Delacroix's ' Dante and Virgil 
in the Infernal Lake '. 

1841 
Charles Dickens, in Barnaby Rudge, introduces (ch. 15) 
reminiscence of Inf. iii. 9 k propos of the peacefulness of the 
Temple — ' Who enters here, leaves noise behind.' 

1844 
La pivina Commedia di Dante Alighieri. (Edimburgo, 24mo.) 

[Edited by G. Rampini, published by Oliver and Boyd ; a re-issue of the 
edition of 1839.] 



ADDENDA 191 

1846 

R. Browning, in the last number of Bells and Pomegranates, in 
an explanation of the title of the series, refers to the Bargello portrait, 
in which ' Giotto placed a pomegranate fruit in the hand of Dante '. 

Richard Ford, in Gatherings from Spain, in the chapter on 
banditti (ch. 16) compares the conduct to his victims of the robber 
Roque Guinart, as described by Cervantes, with that of ' the Italian 
bandit Ghino de Tacco, immortalised by Dante ' (Purg. vi. 14) ; and, 
a propos of the door of the condemned cell of a Spanish prison, 
quotes Inf. iii. 9 ; in the chapter on bull- fights (ch. 21), in connexion 
with the fact that ' in Spain butchers are of the lowest caste ', he 
remarks that ' Francis I never forgave the " Becajo de Parigi " 
applied by Dante to his ancestor ' {Purg. xx. 52). 

1848 

Thackeray, in The Book of Snobs, represents (ch. 26) the author 
' in a waggish mood asking Miss Wirt [Miss Ponto's governess] 
whether Dante Algiery was so called because he was born at Algiers ', 
to which he ' received a smiling answer in the affirmative '. 

Dickens, in Dombey and Son, introduces (ch. 23) reminiscence of 
Inf. iii. 9 k propos of the ' two ominous extinguishers ' on either side 
of the door of Mr. Dombey's house, ' that seemed to say, " Who enter 
here, leave light behind ".' 

1850 

Thackeray, in Rebecca and Rowena, in his account of the siege of 
the Castle of Chalus (ch. 3) says, ' What should prevent me from 
describing the agonies of hunger which the Count (a man of large 
appetite) suffered in company with his heroic sons and garrison ? — 
Nothing, but that Dante has already done the business in the 
notorious history of Count Ugolino.' 

1851 
George Borrow, in Lavengro, records (eh. 15) a dialogue on the 
subject of Dante between himself and his ' preceptor in the French 
and Italian tongues ', a banished priest — ' " Vous serez un jour un 
grand philologue, mon cher ", said the old man, on our arriving at the 
conclusion of Dante's Hell. " I hope I shall be something better," 
said I, . . . " for example, I would rather be like him who wrote this 
book." — " Quoi, Monsieur Dante ? He was a vagabond, my dear, 
forced to fly from his country . . . one bad dog, forced to fly from his 
country — died with not enough to pay the undertaker." — " Were you 
not forced to flee from your country ? " — " That very true ; but 



192 ADDENDA 

1851 — continued. 
there is much difference between me and this Dante. He fled from 
country because he had one bad tongue which he shook at his betters. 
I fly because benefice gone, and head going . . . Mafoi, ilya beaucoup 
de difference entre moi el ce sacre de Dante." ' Later Borrow describes 
how, while fishing, ' sometimes my mind would dwell on my studies — 
on the sonorous stanzas of Dante, rising and falling like the waves 
of the sea.' In a dialogue (ch. 17) between himself and Jasper, the 
latter tells him he wants mother sense — ' What makes you think 
that I want sense ? '— ' That, being so old, you can't yet guide 
yourself ! ' — ' I can read Dante, Jasper.' — ' Anan, brother.' — Subse- 
quently he confesses (ch. 18) that ' of late I had abandoned in a great 
measure the study of the beautiful Italian, and the recitation of the 
sonorous terzets of the Divine Comedy, in which at one time I took 
the greatest delight.' 

1857 

Dickens, in Little Dorrit, represents (Bk. ii, ch. 6) Miss Fanny as 
' completing Mr. Sparkle's conquest with some remarks upon Dante 
— ^known to that gentleman as an eccentric man in the nature of an 
Old File, who used to put leaves round his head, and sit upon a stool 
for some unaccountable purpose outside the cathedral at Florence '. 

George Borrow, in The Romany Rye, quotes (ch. 4) and applies 
to Lord Lovat what Dante says {Inf. xxvii. 74-5) of Guido da Monte- 
feltro — ' Old Fraser, of Lovat . . . thought he was a hero, and proved 
himself nothing more than an old fox ; he got up a hollow tree, 
didn't he, just like a fox ? " L'opere sue non furon leonine, ma di 
volpe ".' 

1865 
Matthew Arnold, in ' Pagan and Mediaeval Religious Senti- 
ment ', in Essays in Criticism, suggests that ' in Sophocles the 
thinking-power a little overbalances the religious sense, as in Dante 
the religious sense overbalances the thinking-power '. 

1871 
Thomas Hardy, in Desperate Remedies, compares (ch. 8, § 5) 
Cytherea upbraiding Edward Springrove, to ' Beatrice accusing 
Dante from the chariot ' (Purq. xxx. 55 ff.). 

1878 
Hardy, in The Return of the Native, compares (Bk. i, ch. 3) the 
scene from Rainbarrow on Egdon Heath during the burning of the 



ADDENDA 193 

bonfire to ' Limbo as viewed from the brink by the sublime Floren- 
tine in his vision ', and ' the muttered articulations of the wind in 
the hollows ' to ' complaints and petitions from the " souls of mighty 
worth " suspended therein ' {Inf. iv). 

1894 

Hardy, in ' On the Western Circuit ', in Life's Little Ironies, says 

(ch. 1) of the scene of the steam-circuses at Melchester at night, ' the 

spectacle was that of the eighth chasm of the Inferno as to colour 

and flame '. 

[The reference may be to the flames in Bolgia 8 of Circle VIII of Hell 
(Inf. xxvi) ; but perhaps the ' chasm ' in question is Round 3 of Circle VII, 
in which the burning sand and the steam from Phlegethon are conspicuous 
features (InJ. xiv. 89-90 ; xv. 2-3).] 

c. 1913 
Charles Russell : translation (in 7-line stanzas) of Inf. iii. 1-51 ; 
and Inf. xxvi. 90-125 (in Sonnets, Poems, and Translations. Lond. 
[Calcutta]). 



INDEX 

1. LITERATURE (Authors, Anonymous Works, MSS., Editions, 

and Translations of Dante's Works, &c.). 

2. ART (Painters, Sculptors, Engravers, &c.. Exhibitions, and 

Principal Subjects). 



o 2 



INDEX I (AUTHORS, &c.). 

Note. The dates are those of the years in which the name occurs. 



A., R., 1846 

AbrahaU, J. H., 1887 

Adv, J., 1884 

Agfionby, Wm., 1685 

Aikin, J., 1802 

Ainger, A., 1900 

Akenside, Mark, 1744, '46 

Alberico da Rosciate, Comenium, 1837 

Alexander, G., 1902 

Alexander, Sir Wm., 1637 

Alford, II., 1833 

Alger, J. G., 1892 

Alger, W. R., 1866 

Alison, Sir A., 1845 

Allen, W. A. T., 1908 

Althorp Library ; see liibliotheca Spen- 

ceriana 
Anster, J., 1896 
Anstey, M., 1904 
Anstie, .T., 1904 
Aretino, Leonardo : see Bruni 
Armstrong, E., 1890, '97, '98, 1903, 06 
Armstrong, T. P., 1899, 1903, '20 
Arnold, IMatt., 1858, '59, '61, '62, "63, 

'65*, 67, '68, '80, '81, '83, '88 
Arnold, Sir E., 1891 
Arnold, T. W.. 1919 
Ashbumham MSS., 184« 
Ashendene Press, 1895, 1902, '04, '05, 

'09 
Ashley, .1. M., 1881 
Ashmolean Museum, Dante drawings, 

1918 
Athenaeum Club, Donation to, 1908 
Atkinson, R., 1874 
Auchmuty, A. C, 1899 
Austin, A., 1900, '08, '09 
Axon, W. E. A., 1908, '11, '14 



B 

B., A. R., 1858 

B., J., 1904 

Baddeley, VV. St. C, 1881 

Bainbrigge, M. S., 1914 

Baldwin, E. L., 1894 

Bale, John, 1548 

Ballantyne, J. M., 1910 

Bannerman, P., 1850 

Baretti, G., 1753, '57, '68 

Barker, Wm., 1554, '68 

Barker, W., 1899 

Barlow, H. C, 1849, '50, '54, '57, '58, 
'59, '60, '61, '62, '64, '65, '66, '67, '68, 
'69, '70, '71, '72, '73, '74, '75 

Barlow Lectureship, 1878 



Barnard, Sir F. A., 1824 

Barnes, Barnabc, 1593 

Barnes, C. L., 1917, '18 

Barnes, T., 1810 

Barrett, E. B., c. 1820, '26, '37, '44-5 ; 

see Browning, E. B. 
Barrington, Hon. D., 1779 
Barrois MSS., 1848 
Barry, W., 1906 

Baxter, L. E. (' Leader Scott '), 1894 
Bayley, A. R., 1905, '11 
Bayley, Peter, 1820, '21 
Bavne, T., 1892, 1911 
Baynes, H., 1891, 1918 
Beattie, J., 1778, '83 
Beatty, H. M., 1914, '20 
Beck, E. A., 1868 
Beckford, Wm., 1783 
Beers, H. A., 1902 
Beilby, A. E., 1911, '15 
Bell, A. M., 1867 

' Bell, Raimonde ' ; see Jones, J. P. 
Beloe, Wm., 1807 
Bent, Hugh, 1862 
Benvenuto da Imola, Comenium, 1887, 

'89, '99, 1901 
Beolchi, C, 1839 
Berenson, B., 1901 
Berington, J., 1814 
Bernard, E., 1697 
Berry, Mary, 1794 
Bessborough, Countess of, 1803, '15 
Bevis, J. L., 1900, '01 
Bezzi, G. A., 1850 
Bibliotheca Askeviana, 1775 
Biblwtkeca Beauclerhiana, 1781 
Bibliotheca Grenvilliana, 1842 
Bibliotheca Harleiana, 1744-5, '53, '59, 

1808 
Bibliotheca Ileberiana, 1834-(> 
Bibliotheca Meadiana, 1754 
Bibliotli£ca Phillippica, 1837 
Bibliotheca Spenceriana, 1815, '22, '23 
Bindley, R., 1888 
Biographical Diet., 1810 
Biographical Review, 1807 
Birckbek, Simon, 1634 
Birkhead, A., 1913 
Black, John, 1815 
Black, J. S., 1890 
Blackwell, T., 1735 
Blake, Wm., 1790, 1800, '06 
Bland, R., 1813, '14 
Blenheim Library, 1882 
Blessington, Lady, 1823, '34 
Blewitt, O., 1843 
Blind, Karl, 1903 



* In Addenda. 



198 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



Blount, C, 1898 

Blount, Sir T. Pope, 1690, '94 

Blundell, J., 1840 

Boccaccio, Gio., Comento, 1611, 1907, 

'13, '20 ; Vita di DanU, 1624, c. '37, 

1808, '34, '37, '42, '43 ; MSS. of, 

1808, '37, '42 
Bodleian Library, 1602-3, '03, '05, '13, 

'20, '74, 1738, 1843, '69-75, '77, '78, 

'80, '90, 1916, '17 ; Catalogues, 

1602-3, '05, '13, '20, '74, 1738, 1843 ; 

Donations to, 1602, '03, 1916, '17 
Bodleian MSS., 1805, '17, '77, '78, '90, 

1916 
Bombay, MS. of Commedia at, 1891 
Booth, Eva Gore, 1912 
Borrow, Geo.*, 1851, '57 
Boswell, C. S., 1895, 1908 
Boswell, Jas., 1773, '91 
Botticelli, 1770, 1829, '42, '87, '96, '97, 

1901, '03, '12, '18 
Bouchier, J., 1876, '77, '78, '88, '90, '91, 

'96, '97 
Bourton, H., 1878 
Bowden, H. S., 1887 
Bowie, John, c. 1780, '81 
Bowring, John, 1830 
Bowyer, G., 1838 
Boyd, H., 1785, 1802 
Bradley, A. C, 1914 
Bray, E. A., c. 1803 
Brendon, J. A., 1912 
Breslar, M. L. R., 1911 
Breton, Nich., 1604, '18 
Breval, J. D., 1726 
Bridge, J. F., 1892 
Bridges, J. H., 1879, '88, '89 
Bridges, Robt., 1895, 1912 
Briscoe, J. P., 1903 
British Museum, 1759, '75, 1807, '08, 

'16, '19, '29, '36, c. '40, '53, '59, '71, 

c. '75, '77, '82, '86, '87, 1915 
British Museum Catalogues, 1759, 

1808, '16, '87 
British Museum, Donations to, 1829, 

1915 
British Museum MSS., 1759, '75, 1807, 

'08, '11, '29, '36, c. '40, '53, '59, '69, 
'70, '71, C. '75, '82, '86 
Brodie, E. H., 1885 
Bromby, C. H., 1897, "98 
Brooks, H. St. J., 1920 
Brooksbank, T., 1854 
Brougham, Hy., 1825, "43 
Brown, C. A., 1818 
Brown, E. B., 1894 
Bro^vn, H. F., 1889 
Brown, Thos., 1702 
Brown, T. E., 1900 
Browne, Edward [1710] 
Browne, Sir Thos., 1658, '71, '72, [1710] 
Browning, E. B., 1848, '49, c. '50, '51, 

'60 ; see Barrett, E. B. 
Browning, J., 1826 
Browning, Oscar, 1877, '89, '91 



Browning, Robt., 1840, '42, '45, '46*, 

'55, '62, '72, '70 
Bruni, Leonardo, Vita di Dante, 1834, 

1912, '19 
Bryce, Jas., 1864 
Brydges, Sir S. E., 1810, '14, '21, '22, 

"25, '34 
Bucke, Chas., 1832 
Buckler, F. W., 1913 
Bunbury, F. J., 1852 
Bunsen, F., 1819 
Buried Bride, 1840 
Burney, Chas., 1761, '71, '82 
Burton, Robt., 1621 
Burton, Wm., 1622 
Bury, Lady Charlotte, 1833 
Bury, P. D., 1840 
Busk, R. H., 1883, "90, '91 
Buti, F. da, Comenio, 1877 
Butler, A. J., 1878, c. '80, '80, '85, '86, 

'90, "92, '93, '94, '95, c. '97, '98, '99, 

1901, '08, '09, '10 
Butterworth, W., 1912 
Byron, Lord, 1806, '13, 14, '18, '19, 

'20, '21, '22, '23, '24 



C, G. J., 1855 

C, J. D., 1888 

Cadell, W. A., 1820 

Caird, Edwd., 1890, 1901, '06 

Calmour, A. C, 1895 

Cambridge MSS., 1715 

Cambridge Univ., Donation to, 1715 ; 
see Trinity Coll. 

Campbell, L., c. 1900 

Campbell, Thos., 1821 

Candler, H., 1905, '10 

Canonici MSS., 1817 

Canzoniere, 1588, '98, 1615, c. '37, 1775- 
8, 1802, '06, '06-7, '08, '09, '17, '18, 
'20, '21, '25, '29, c.'30, '31, '32, '88, '34, 
'35, '39, '40, c.'41, '42, '44, c. '45, '45, 
'61, c. '64, c. '75, '75, '76, '79, '84, '86, 
'87, c. '88, '94, 1901, '04, '06, '10, '17 

Canzoniere, English editions of text, 
1809, '35, '40, '42, '45 

Canzoniere, English translations,(Lyell) 
c. 1830, '35, '40, '42, '45 ; (Plumptre) 
1887 ; (Wicksteed) 1906 

Canzoniere, MSS. of, (Brit. Mus.) 1808 ; 
(Bodl.) 1817 ; (Rylands) 1901 ; 
(Phillipps) 1919 

Canzoni e Sonelti di Dante, 1809 

Cape Town, MS. of Commedia at, 1910 

Carducei, G., 1891 

Carlisle, Earl of, 1772 

Carlyle, .J. A., 1849 

Carlyle, Thos., 1827, '28, '31, '37, '38, 
"39, '40, '43 

Carmichael, C. H. E., 1877 

Carmichael MS., 1903 

Carmichael Sale, 1903 

Carnarvon, Earl of, c. 1880 



* In Addenda. 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



199 



Carpenter, W. Boyd, 1883. '95, 1900, 

'14, '16, '17 
Carroll, J. S., 1903, '06, '11 
Cart, H. T., 1904 ; see Lafontaine, 

Cart de 
Cary, H. F., 1792, '94, '96, '98, 1800, 

'05, '06, '12, '14, '19, '22, '23, '25, 

'27, '31, '33, '42, '43, '44 
Castelvetro, L., Comenlo, 1886 
Castle, M. L. Egerton, 1907, '10 
Cates, W. L. B., 1867, '72 
Cavalcaselle, G. B., 1850 
Cayley, C. B., 1851, '53, '54, '55, '61 
Cayley, J., 1850 
Chalmers, A., 1813 
Chambers, R. W., 1910 
Chaplin, G., 1913 
Chapman, E. R., 1887 
Charlemont, Earl of, 1797, c. '98 
Charteris, Wm., c. 1875 
Chaucer, Geoffrey, c. 1380-2, '82, '84, 

c. '85-6, c. '86-8, c. '90 
Chaytor, H. J., 1902, '03, 04 
Cheltenham Play, 1900 
Cheney, Edwd., 1832 
Chester, J., 1903 
' Chester, Norley ' ; see Underdown, 

Emily 
Chesterfield, Earl of, 1751 
Cheyne, T. K., 1885, '88 , 
Church, F. J., 1879 
Church, Miss, 1913 
Church, R. W., 1850, '88 
Churchyard, Thos., 1568, '80, '81, '87, 

'93, '95 
Clairmont, Clara, 1816, '21 
Clark, K. McC, 1894 
Clark, W., 1899 
Clarke, Hyde, 1892 
Clarke, I. C, 1919 
Clarke, Sarah F., 1884 
Clarke, Wm., 1819 
Clarke, E. M., 1879 
Cleveland, .John, c. 1646 
Cliffe, F. H., 1896 
' Coelo Ictus,' 1866 
Coke, Thos., c. 1716-18 
Coleridge, S. T., 1802, '05, '06, '10, '13, 

'17, '18, '19, '24 
Collier, J. Payne, 1820 
Collier, Jeremy, 1705 
Commedia ; see Divina Commedia 
Conder, Josiah, 1834 
Constable, A., 1909 
Convilo ; see Convivkt 
Convivio, 1568, '84, '86, '98, 1629, '36, 

c. '37, '74, '75, c. 1710-18, '54, '62, 

1810, '15, '17, '19, '22, '24, c. '30, 

'31-42, '33, '34-6, '35, '40, '42, "45, 

'76, '81, '87, '89, '94, '95, c. '97, '97, 

'99, 1900, '02, '03, '04, '09, '10, '11, 

'12, '13, '14, '16, '17 ; editio princeps. 

c. 1702, '54, 1815, '24, '34-6, '82 
Convivio, English translations, (Lyell) 

c. 1830 ; (Sayer) 1887 ; (HiUard) 



1889 ; (Wicksteed) 1903 ; (Jackson) 

1909 
Convivio, MSS. of, (Holkham) c. 1716- 

18 ; (Bodl.) 1817, 1916 ; (Brit.Mus.) 

1871 ; (Moore) 1880, 1916 
Cooke, Alex., 1610 
Cooper, Thos., 1565 
Cork, Earl of, 1754 
Corkran, A., 1908 
Cornelius, W., 1820 
' Cornwall, Barry ' ; see Procter, B. W. 
Cossio, A., 1910 
Cotes, R. A., 1898 
Cotterill, H. B., 1871, '74, 1919 
Coulton, G. G., 1905, '06 
Courthope, W. J., 1908 
Covell, Wm., 1595 
Coxe, Wm., 1823 
Crabb, Geo., 1825 
Crabbe, Geo., 1819 
Craigie, P. M. T., 1901, '04 
Craik, G. L., 1844 
Crastcr, H. H. E., 1920 
Crawford MSS., 1901 
Creighton, M., 1873, '74 
Criticisms on the Rolliad, 1784 
Croker, J. W., 1804 
Cross, J. W., 1886, '90, '93 
Cunningham, Alan, 1823 
Curzon of Kedleston, Lord, 1915 
Cuttell, J., 1901 



D 

Dabbs, G. H. R., 1893 

Dacres, Edwd., 1636 

Dallington, Sir R., 1598, 1605 

Daniel, Geo., c. 1645 

Daniel, Sam., 1585 

Daniello, B., Comento, 1602-3, '05, '11, 
c. '37, 1781 

Dante Exhibitions, 1893, 1909 

Dante, Jacopo di ; see Jacopo 

Dante Lectureships, (Barlow) 1878 ; 
(Taylorian) 1895 

Dante MSS., (Canzoniere) 1808, '17, 
1901, '19 ; (Commedia) 1444, 1639, 
'97, 1715, c. '16-18, '53, '59, '75, 
1805, '07, '08, '17, '29, '34-6, '37, 
'48, '53, '59, '67, '69, '70, '77, '78, '80, 
'82, '90, '91, '95, '96, 1901, '08, '10, 
'16, '18, '20 ; (commentaries) 1444, 
1536^2, 1781, 1811, '29-30, '37, '77, 
'86, 1918 ; (Convivio) c. 1716-18, 
1817, '71, '80, 1916 ; (De Mon.) 
1903, '18 ; (De Vulg. Eloq.) 1900, '18, 
'19 ; (Inferno) 1882, 1918 ; (Para- 
diso) 1877 ; (translations) 1536-42, 
'42-3, c. 1840, c. '75, '80, 1915, '18 ; 
(Vita Nuova) 1817 ; (Boccaccio's 
Vita) 1808, '37, '42 

Dante, Opere di, 1894, 1909 

Dante, Pietro di ; see Pietro 

Dante Societies, (Oxford) 1876 ; (Lon- 
don) 1881 ; (Manchester) 1906 



* In Addenda. 



200 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



Danvers, Sir H., 1602 

D'Arblay, Madame, 1832 

Darley, Geo., 1846 

Davies, W., 1893 

Davies, Walford, 1920 

Davis, J. B., 1867 

Dayman, J., 1843, '65 

Defferrari, T. B., 1820 

Defries, E. P., 1891 

Delta, T., 1896 

Desmaizeaux, P., 1735 

De Vere, Aubrey, 1893 

Devonshire, Duchess of, c. 1822 

Dibdin, T. F., 1811, '15, '22, '23, '24 

Dickens, Chas.*, 1841, '48, '57. 

Digby, Kenelm H., 1826-7, '31-42 

Digby, Sir Kenelm, 1643 

Dillon, P., 1881 

D'Israeli, B., 1832, '44 

D'lsraeli, I., 1793, 1817, '23, '34, '40 

Divina Commedia, early commentaries, 
(Serravalle) 1416-17, 1444, 1536-^2, 
1781, 1811, '86 : (Danielle) 1602-3, 
'05, '11, c. '37, 1781, 1897 ; (Landino) 
1603, '05, '11, '27, c. '30, '35, '90, 
1710, '64, '70, '81 ; (Vellutello) 1605, 
'11, '27, '90, 1710 ; (Boccaccio) 1611, 
1907, '13, '20 ; (Anon.) 1639, '97 ; 
(Pietro di Dante) 1829-30, '46 ; 
(Anon.) 1829-30 ; (Alberico da 
Rosciate) 1837 ; (Ottimo) 1839 ; 
(Anon.) 1846 ; (Anon.) 1848 ; (Benv. 
da Imola) 1887, '89, '99, 1901 ; 
(Anon.) 1918. 

Divina Commedia, English commenta- 
ries, (Butler) 1880-85-92 ; (Vernon) 
1889-94-1900 ; (Tozer) 1901 

Divina Commedia, English editions of 
text, 1808(2), 1819, '19-20, '22-3, 
'27, '39, '42-3, '44*, '65, '90, 1900 (2) 

Divina Commedia, English translations, 
(Huggins) 1760 ; (Boyd) 1785-1802 ; 
(Cary) 1805-06-14 ; (Wright) 1833- 
36-40 ; (Dayman) 1843-65 ; (Ban- 
nerman) 1850 ; (Cayley) 1851-53- 
54 ; (O'Donnell) 1852 ; (Pollock) 
1854; (Thomas) 1859-62-66; 
(Payne) c. 1860 ; (Ramsay) 1862- 
63 ; (Ford) 1865-70 ; (Johnston) 
1867-1868 ; (Charteris) c. 1875 ; 
(Butler) 1880 - 85 - 92 ; (Minchin) 
1885 ; (Plumptre) 1886-7 ; (Hasel- 
foot) 1887 ; (Vernon) 1889-94-1900 ; 
(Lowe) 1902 ; (Wilberforce) 1903-9 ; 
(Griffith) 1903-11 ; (Tozer) 1904 ; 
(Wright) 1908 ; (Wheeler) 1911 ; 
(Shaw) 1914 

Diirina Commedia, MSS. of, (Oxford 
Univ.) 1444 ; (Eton) 1639, '97, 1895 ; 
(Westminster) 1697 ; (Camb. Univ.) 
1715 ; (Holkham) c. 1716-18, 1867 ; 
(Harley) 1753, '59, 1808 ; (Brit. 
Mus.) 1759, '75, 1807, '08, '29, '36, 
'53, '59, '69, '70, '82 ; (Bodleian) 
1805, '17, '77 '78; '90, 1916; 



(D'Orville) 1805 ; (Lansd.) 1807 
(Canonici) 1817 ; (Egerton) 1829 
(Heber) 1834r-6 ; (Phillipps) 1837 
(Ashburnham) 1848 ; (Hawtrey) 
1853 ; (Libri) 1859 ; (Glasgow) 
1869 ; (Moore) 1880, 1916 ; (Sunder- 
land) 1882 ; (Bombay) 1891 ; (Lis- 
bon) 1896 ; (Crawford) 1901 ; (Ry- 
lands) 1901, '08, '10 ; (Cape Town) 
1910 ; (Vernon) 1918 ; (Mostyn) 
1920 ; (Anon.) 1920 

Divina Commedia, MSS. of commen- 
taries on, (Serravalle) 1444, 1536-42, 
1781, 1811, '86 ; (Anon.) 1639, '97 ; 
(Pietro di Dante) 1829-30 ; (Anon.) 
1829-30 ; (Alberico da Rosciate) 
1837 ; (Anon.) 1918 

Divina Commedia, MSS. of translations 
of, (Latin) 1536-42 (Wells) ; (Casti- 
lian) 1542-3 (Westm.) ; (French) 
1712 (Turin) ; (English) c. 1840, 
c. '75, 1915 (Brit. Mus.) ; 1880 (Bodl.). 

Divina Commedia, Welsh translation, 
1902, '03 

Dobell, Sydney, 1854 

Dobson, W. T., 1879 

Dodgson, E. S., 1892 

Dods, M., 1903 

Donne, .John, c. 1600, c. '20 

Dormer, J., 1903 

Dormei, Sir Michael, 1603 

D'Orville MSS., 1805 

Douce, F., 1807 

Douglas, Sir G., 1901 

Dowe, Wm., 1843 

Downes, R. P., 1905 

Drake, Nathan, 1798 

Drake, O. S. T., 1875 

Drayton, Michael, 1597 

Dnmamond, Wm., c. 1620 

Dryden, .John, 1684, '85, '97, 170 ) 

Dugdale, W. S., 1883 

Dunlop, J. Colin, 1814 

Dunster, Chas., c. 1800 

Duppa, R., 1806 

Dyer, Louis, 1915 



E 

E., T. S., 1920 

Earie, John, 1896, '98, '99 

Eastlake, C. L., 1842 

Eclogae, 1903 ; English edition of text, 
1902 ; English translations, (Plump- 
tre) 1887 ; (Wicksteed) 1902, '04 

Edinburgh, St. George's Free Church, 
1890 

Edwardes, E. J., 1915 

Edwardes, M., 1907 

Egerton, A., 1903 

Egerton MSS., 1781, 1811, '29 

' Eliot, George ' ; see Evans, Marian 

Eliot, T. S., 1920 

Ellaby, E. R., 1871 

Ellis, Geo., 1796 



* In Addenda. 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



201 



Elton, Oliver, 1889, '93 

Encyc. Bnt., 1779, '97, 1842, '77, 1910 

English Encyc, 1802 

Ensor, Geo., 1819 

Epistolae, 1818, '24, '92, '98, 1904, '10, 
'12, '13, '14, '15, '16, '17, '18, '19, '20; 
English edition of text, 1920 ; Eng- 
lish translations, (Wicksteed) 1904 ; 
(Toynbee) 1920 

' Erem,' 1874 

Eton College, Bequest to, 1689 

Eton MSS., 1639, '97, 1895 

Eustace, J. C, 1813 

Evans, Marian (' George Eliot '), 1860, 
'6^3, '72, '74, '76, '78, '79 

Evelyn, John, 1645 

Evershed, Mrs. John, 1913 

Eictracts from . . . Italian Poets, 1798 



F., A. F., 1865 

F., T. E., 1865 

F., W. H., 1854 

Fagan, Louis, 1900 

Fairfax, Edwd., 1600 

Falconer, W., 1860 

Famewort;h, E., 1762 

Farrar, F. W., 1886 

Fearon, D. R., 1898, '99, 1900, '01, '02, 

'03, '04 
Federn, K., 1902 
Ferrier, Susan E., 1824, '31 
Ficino, Marsilio, MS. of his translation 

of De Monorchia, 1918 
Finck, H. T., 1887 
Fitzgerald, C, 1889 
Fitzgerald, Edwd., c. 1832, '35, '39, '41, 

'47, '63, '70, '76, "82 
Flint, J., 1884 
Florio, John, 1591, "98, 1611 
Flower, W., 1897, '98 
Ford, Jas., 1865, '70 
Ford, John, 1633 
Ford, Rich.*, 1846 
Forman, A., 1874 
Forman, H. Buxton, 1874, '78 
Forster, E. M., 1908 
Forsyth, J., 1813 

Foscolo, Ugo, 1814, '18, '21, '23, '25 
Foster, J., 1912 
Fountaine Sale, 1902 
Fox, Chas. Jas., 1794, 1802, '03, 

[1834^6], [1837] 
Foxe, John, 1559, '70 
Fraser, F. 1., 1908 
Fraunce, Abrah., 1592 
Freshfield, D., 1882, 1907 
tVy, E. F., c. 1910 
Fry, Sir Edwd., 1900 
Fulford, W., 1865 
Fuller, Thos., 1655 
Furnivall, F. J., 1872 
Fuseli, H., 1801, '09, '20 
Fyfe, W. W., 1854 



G., 1883 

G., A. M., 1858 

Gallenga, A., 1841, '47, '49 

Gardner, E. G., 1893, '97, '98, '99, 

1900, '01, '02, '03, '04, '09, '12, '13, 

'18, '20 
Gamett, R., 1894, '95, '96, '98, '99, 

1900, '02 
Gamier, J. Carpenter, 1901 
Garrod, H. B., 1905, '06, '13 
Garrow, Jos., 1846 
Garrow, Theodosia, 1840 
Gibbon, Edwd., c. 1761, '88, '90 
Giglioli, I., 1899 
Gillum, W. J., 1896 
Gladstone, H. S., 1909 
Gladstone, VV. E., 1835, '36, '37, '89, 

'44, '83, '92 
Gladwin, F.*, 1799 
Glasgow, Hunterian Museum, MS. of 

Commedia, 1869 
Glassford, Jas., 1846 
Gloucester, Humphrey, Duke of, 1444 
Godwin, \Vm., 1803 
Goldsmith, O., 1759 
Goodier, M. A., 1895 
Gore Booth, Eva, 1912 
Gorton, John, 1828 
Gosse, Edmd., 1878, '90 
Gower, John, c. 1390 
Grant, J. G., 1847 
Grant, Mis. C, 1912 
Gray, Thos., c. 1737, '50, '60-1, '69, '70 
Green, J. R., 1876 
Green, W. C, 1901 
Greene, G. A., 1903 
Greene, Robt., 1583, '84, '87 
Grenville, Lord, c. 1820, '24 
Grenville, Thos., 1842 
Greswell, W. P., 1801 
Griffith, Sir S. W., 1898, 1903, '08, '11, 

'14 
Griffin, Gerald, 1829 
Grinnell-Milne, G., 1909 
Guest, Edwin, 1838 
Guido da Pisa, Comentum, 1882 
Guppy, H., 1909 
Gurney, E. Russell, 1893 
Gwynn-Jones, T., 1903 
Gwynne, C. T., 1879 

H 
H., H., 1859 
H., J. M., 1864 
H., O. O., 1903 
H., W. H., 1903 
Haigh, A. E., 1878 
Hales, J. W., 1882, '87 
Hall, A., 1890, '99 
Hall, Robt., 1825 
Hallam, Arthur H., 1824, '28, c. '30, 

'30, '31, '32 
Hallam, Hy., 1818, '37 
Hallett, W. Hughes, 1902 



* In Addenda. 



202 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



Halsham, John, 1897 

Hamilton, E. H., 1890 

Hanmer, Sir John, 1840 

Harding, J. G., 1868 

Hardy, Thos.*, 1871, '78, '80, '94 

Hare, A. W., 1827 

Hare, C, 1905 

Hare, J. C, 1827 

Harford, F. K., 1886, '87 

Harington, Sir John, 1591, [c. 1610] 

Harleian MSS., 1753, '59, 1808 

Harris, H., 1866 

Harris, Jas., 1780 

Harrison, Fred., 1892, 1912, '20 

Harrison, Jane E., 1903 

Hartshome, C. H., 1829 

Harvev, Gabriel, 1577, '78, '93 

Harvey, W., 1902 

Haselfoot, F. K. H., 1887 

Hatfield, Jonathan, 1826 

Hawke, P., c. 1840 

Hawkes, E. A., 1857 

Hawkins, Sir John, 1776 

Hawkins, Sir John, 1905, '09 

Hawtrey Sale, 18555 

Haydon, B. R., 1818 

Hayes, R., 1909 

Hayley, Wm., 1778, '81, '82 

Haythomthwait, P., 1907 

Hazlitt, Wm., 1814, '15, '16, '18, "20, 

"22, '24, "25, "26, '30 
Hebb, J., 1896, "99, 1900, '03, '05, '07 
Heber Sale, 1834-6 
Heberden, C. B., 1908, '14 
Heinemann-Sindici, M., 1900 
Hemans, Felicia, 1851 
Henderson, H. F., 1903, '10 
Hendriks, F., 1898 
Henley, Sam., 1786 
Henry VIII, Catalogue of Library of, 

1542-3 
Hensman, Mary, 1892 
Heraud, John A., 1830, c. '40 
Hertord, C. H., 1910 
Hersehel, Sir J. W. F., 1868 
Hervey, Christopher, 1785 
Hewlett, M., 1895, '96, 1904, 13 
Heywood, Thos., 1635 
Hibbert Library, 1829 
Higgins, A., 1887, 1902 
Higginson, C. J., 1902 
Higginson, Nesta (' Moira O'Neill '), 

1894 
Hillard, Kath., 1889, '91 
Hindley, Chas., 1842 
Hippisley, J. H., 1837 
Hoare, Sir R. Colt, 1819 
Hobhouse, J. C, 1818 
Hodgkin, L. V., 1902 
Hodgkin, Thos., 1901 
Hogan, J. F., 1899 
Hogg, W., 1908 



Holkham MSS., c. 1716-18, 1867 

Holland, Lord, 1827 

Holthouse, E. H., 1913 

Holyday, Barten, 1661, "73 

Home, Sam., 1899, 1901 

Hood, Thos., 1832, '34, "41 

Hoole, John, 1783 

Hooper, H. J., 1916, '18 

Hooper, J.. 1880 

Hope, H. G., 1901, '03 

Hornby, C. H. St. J. ; see Ashendene 

Press 
Horner, F., 1816 
Horridge, F., 1897 
Howard, A., 1830 
Howard, N., 1807 

Howell, A. G. F., 1890, '94, '95, 1904 
Howell, Jas., 1659 
Hudson, R., 1889 
Huggins, Wm., c. 1758, '60 
Hughes, Thos., 1588 
Himie, Jos., 1812 
Humphrey, Laurence, 1582 
Hunt, Leigh, 1812, '16, '18, '19, "21, 

'25, '28, '32, '39, '41, '44, "46 
Hunterian Museum ; see Glasgow 
Huth, A. H., 1900 
Huth Sale, 1912 
Hutton, W. H., 1893, 1908, '09 
Hyde, Thos., 1674 

I 

Imola, Benv. da ; see Benvenuto 
Imperial Diet, of Univ. Biog., c. 1860 
Inferno, early commentaries, (Jacopo 
di Dante) 1848 ; (Guido da Pisa) 
1882 (MS.) ; (Castelvetro) 1886 
Inferno, English editions of textf, 
1805-6, '24, '26-7, '49, '89, '92, '94, 
1902 
Inferno, English translations,* (Burney) 
1761 ; (Rogers) 1782 ; (Boyd) 1785 
(Cary) 1805-6 ; (Howard) 1807 
(Hume) 1812 ; (Wright) 1833 
(Heraud) c. 1840 ; (Dayman) 1843 
(Wade) 1845-6 ; (Carlyle) 1849 
(Cayley) 1851 ; (Brooksbank) 1854 
(Thomas) 1859 ; (Whyte) 1859 
(Wilkie) 1862 ; (Bent) 1862 ; (Ram- 
say) 1862 ; (Ford) 1865 ; (Rossetti) 
1865 ; (Johnston) 1867 ; (Tomlin- 
son) 1877 ; (Pike) 1881 ; (Sibbald) 
1884; (Plumptre) 1886; (Butler) 

1892 ; (Sullivan) 1893 ; (Musgrave) 

1893 ; (Vernon) 1894 ; (Urquhart) 
1895 : (Lee-Hamilton) 1898 ; (Gar- 
nier) IgOl ; (Wilberforce) 1903 : 
(Griffith) 1903 ; (Edwardes) 1915 ; 
(Hooper) 1918 

Inferno, French translation, (Tarver) 
1824 



* In Addenda. f Other than those contained in editions of the Commedia. 

X Translations of the Inferno which were published separately in the first 
instance, but subsequently formed part of complete translations of the Corn- 
media, are included in this list. 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



208 



Ivfemo, MS. of translation, (English) 

c. 1840, 1915 (Brit. Mus.) 
Inferru), MSS. of, 1918 (Vernon) 
Inquisitor, 1836 
Irving, H., 1903 
Irving, L., 1903 
Itinerary through France, Italy, and 

Flanders*, c. 1513 



' Jabez', 1877 

Jackson, Cyril, 1800 

Jackson, W. W., 1906, '09 

Jacopo di Dante, Comento, 1848 

James, M. R., 1895 

James, Thos., 1602-3, '05, 13, '20, '27 

Jameson, Anna B., 1826, "29 

Janus, 1826 

Jebb, R. C, 1898 

Jennings, H. Constantine, 1794 

Jewel, .John, 1567 

Joanna of Sicily, Life of, 1824 

John Hylands Library ; see Manchester 

Johnson, Lionel, 1894 

Johnson, Sam., 1773, '81 

Johnston, C, 1823 

Johnston, D., 1867, '68 

Jones, J. P., 1893 

Jonson, Ben, 1605 

Jourdain, Eleanor F., 1894, '95, 1902 

Jupp, R. F., 1891 

K 
K., H., 1875 
Keary, C. F., 1882 

Keats, John, 1815*, '17, '18, '19, '20 
Keble, John, 1825, '37, '40, '41 
Keightley, T., 1861 
Kellison, Matt., 1621 
Kelly, C. A., 1872 
Kemble, Frances A., c. 1824, '31, '32, 

'66, '83 
Kendall, H:, 1869 
Kennedy, H. L. G., 1911 
Keper, .John, 1598 
Ker, W. P., 1898, 1918 
Kerslake, T., 1888 
Kettle, F., 1899 
King, Alice, 1870, '74 
King, Wm., 1709 
Kirkup, Seymour S., 1840, '41, '42, '43, 

'50, '65, '70, '71, '72 
Kitclun, G. VV., 1900 
Knight, .los., 1878 
Knox, A. A., 1842 
Kolbe, F. C, 1902 
Krebs, H., 1885, '99, 1900 
Kyd, Thos., 1588 



L., G. G., 1918 
L., H. P., 1909 
L., H.W., 1874, '75 
L., T., 1868 
Lacaita, J. P., 1887 



Lacy, M. E., 1912 

Lafontaine, H. Cart de, 1915 ; see 

Cart, H. T. 
Lamb, Chas., 1796, '97, 1820, '21, '33, '34 
Lamotte, Chas., 1731 
Landino, C, Cojhento, 1603, '05. '11, 

'27, c. '30, '35, "90, 1710, '64, '70, '81 
Landor, VV. S., 1812, "20, c. '22, '23, '24, 

'26, '28, '36, '40, '43, '45, '46, '50, '58 
Langdon, Ida, 1912 
Langton, Cora. 1892 
Lansdowne MSS., 1775, 1807 
Lassels, Rich., c. 1660 
Latham, John, 1826 
Lawrence, C. M., 1898 
Lee-Hamilton, E., 1888, '94, '98 
Le Gallienne, R., 1888, '95 
Leigh, Edwd., 1656 
Leigh, Gertrude, 1907, '20 
Leith, Emily, 1885 
Leland, John, 1536, '42, c. '42 
Lennard, Samson, 1612 
Levien, F., 1875 
Libri MSS., 1848, '59 
Liddon, H. P., 1881, '83, '88 
Lindsay, J., 1896 
Lippmann, F., 1896 
Lisbon, MS. of Commedia at, 1896 
Little, W. J. Knox, 1892 
Lives of the Illustriotis, 1855 
Lloyd, Nich., 1670 
Lockhart, J., 1865 
Lockhart, J. G., 1818, '43 
Locock, Frances, 1871 
Lofft, Capell, 1806-7 
Lofthouse, W . F., 1902 
London Dante Society, 1881 ; Lectures, 

1904, '06, '09 
Lotliian, R., 1875 
Lowe, E. C, 1902, '04 
Lucas, E. v., 1912 
Lushington, V., 1901 
Lydgate, John. 1430 
Lyell, Chas., c. 1830, "35, '42, '45 
Lynch, A., 1914, '19 
Lyndsay, Sir D., c. 1528 
' Lysart ', 1903 
Lj'ttelton, Lord, 1760 

M 
M., A. J., 1890 
M., H. H., 1897 
M., J., 1852 
M., R. W., 1903 
Macaulay, T. B., 1824, "25, '27, '28, '30, 

'31, '34, '37, '38, '40, '43, '44 
McCullv, R., 1870 
McCurdy, E., 1900 
Macdonnell, VV. R., 1891 
Maefarlane, Chas., 1832 
McGovem, J. B., 1900, 01, '02, '04, 

'05, '08, '09, '10, 11, 12, '13, '14, '15 
MacGregor, Jas., 1880 
M'Grath, T., 1871 
Mackail, J. VV., 1911, "15 



♦ In Addenda. 



204 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



McKay, W. J. S., 1909 

McLeod, A., 1900 

Macray, J., 1830 

Magnus, L., 1918 

Mahony, F. S. (' Father Prout '), 1835 

Maitland, E. J. S., 1803 

Maiden, H., 1838 

Malkin, A. T., 1833 

Mallock, W. H., 1893 

Manchester Daute Society, 1906 

Manchester, John Rylands Library, 
[1811, '23], 1892, 1901, '05, '08, '09 

Manetti, Gian., Vita Dantis, 1782, 1919 

Mann, Hor., 1753 

Manning, A., 1859 

Manning, Cardinal, 1885 

' Mariotti, L.' ; see Gallenga, A. 

Marriott, C, 1920 

Marshall, E., 1887, '91 

Martin, Thcod., 1845, '47, '55, '62, '90, 
1907 

Martin, W. W., 1891 

Matheson, P. E., 1907 

Mathew, A. H., 1908 

Mathias, T. J., 1798, 1802, "08, '14 

Matthews, Hy., 1820 

Maurice, F. D., 1857 

Mayhew, A. L., 1907 

Mazzinghi, T. J., 1844 

Mazzini, G., 1837, '43, '44 

Med>vin, Thos., c. 1820, '21, '33, '34, '47 

Mercer, W., 1883, '84, '86, '93, '95 

Meredith, Geo., 1865, '66, '71, '75, '85 

Meres, Francis, 1598 

Merivale, J. H., 1814, '38, '43, '44 

Mey, F. de, 1902 

Miall, A. B., 1896 

Michell, N., 1876 

Michell, R. B., 1865 

Mickle, W. J., 1775 

Mignaty, M., 1865 

Miller, L., 1909 

Mills, Chas., 1818, '22, '25 

Milman, H. H., 1855 

Milne, G. Gruinell-, 1909 

Milnes, R. Monckton, 183S 

Milton, John, 1629, c. '34, '34, c. '37, 
'37-8, '41, '42, '46, '67 

Minchin, J. I., 1885 

' Mimme ', 1910 

Misson, F. M., 1695 

Mitchell, Thos., 1813 

MoUoy, Gerald, 1897 

Monarchia, De, 1559, '70, 1602-3, '12, 
'13, '20, '21, '27, c. '37, '50, '74, 
1826-7, '43, '55, '64, '79, '93, '96, '98, 
'99, 1902, '03, '04, '06, '13, '14, '15, 
'18, '19 ; editio princeps, 1843 

Monarchia, De, English translations, 
(Church) 1879 ; (Wicksteed) 1896, 
1904 ; Italian, (Ficino) 1918 

Monarchia, De, MSS. of, (Carmicbael) 

1903 ; (Vernon) 1918 
Money, A. L., 1910 
Monmouth, Earl of, 1656 
Monro, D. B., 1901 
Monro, E., 1856 



Montagu-Douglas-Scott, C. H., 1908 

Montgomery, .las., 1835, '36, '38 

Moore, Edwd., 1877, '78, '79, '80, '81, 
'83, '86, '87, '88, '89, '90, '91, '92, 
'93, '94, '95, '96, "97, '98, '99, 1900, '01, 
'02, '03, 05, '08, '10, '14, '16, ['17] 

Moore MSS., 1880, 1916 

Moore, Thos., 1806, '19, "27, '28, c. '30, 
'30, '34, '41, '42 

More, Hannah, 1789 

Morehead, Robt., 1803, '14, '18, '19,- 
'20, "26 

Morgan, Lady, 1821 

Morley, I^rd, c. 1545 

Mornington, Earl of, 1791 ; see Welles- 
ley, Marquis 

Morris, Sir Lewis, 1890 

Morrison, H., 1903 

Morshead, E. D. A., 1875, '84, '85, 
1903, '04 

Moryson, Fynes, 1594, c. 1617 

Mostyn MS., 1920 

MSS. of Dante ; see Dante MSS. 

Miur, J., 1896 

Mulcahy, W. J., 1904 

Mulhall, Mrs., 1896 

Mulock, Dinah M., 1859 

Munby, A. J., 1891 

Munday, W. L., 1907 

Munro, H. A. J., 1859 

Murray, Fairfax, Sale, 1918 

Muses Mercury, 1707 

Museum of Foreign Literature, 1827 

Musgrave, Geo., 1893 

Musical Performances, 1890 (Edin.), 
1920 (Wore), 1920 (Lond.) 



Napier, G. G., 1907 
Napier, Hv. E., 1846 
Neele, Hy., 1827 
Neil, Sam., 1865 
Neve, Phil., 1789 
Neville, E. H., 1904 
Neville, Hy., 1675 
Newton, Thos., 1749 
Nicholson, B., 1879 
Nicklin, T., 1918 
Nind, Wm., 184() 
' Norfolk ', 1909 
Norgate, F., 1876, '81 
' North, Christopher ' ; see Wilson, John 
Northall, John, 1753 
Northcote, Jas., 1813 
Notizie intorno aW Origine . . . delta 
Lingua e della Letteratura Ital., 1832 
Nott, G. F., c. 1810, '15, '42 

O 
O., H., 1918 
O'Connor, D. M., 1890 
O'Donnell, E., 1852 
Oelsner, H., 1895, '98, '99, 1900, '01 
Okey, Thos., 1901, '06, '20 
Oliphant, Marg., 1875, '76, "77 
(Mivier, A., 1885 
' O'Neil, Moira ' ; see Higginson, Ncsta 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



205 



Opera, 1918 (Birm.), 1920 (Lond.) 

Opere di Dante, English editions of 
text, 1894, 1909 

Oriel Coll., Oxford, Donation to, 1913 

Orr, M. A. ; see Evershed, Mrs. 

Ottimo Comento, 1839 

Ottley, W. Y., 1816 

' Ouida ' ; see Ramee, Louise de la 

Owen, Joiin, 1893 

Oxford, Countess of, 1753 

Oxford Dante, 1894 

Oxford Dante Society, 1876 ; Record, 
1920 

Oxford MSS., 1444, 1536-42, 1805, '17, 
'77, '78, '90, 1910 

Oxford Univ. ; see Ashmolean ; Bod- 
leian ; Oriel Coll. ; Queen's Coll. ; 
Taylorian 



P., 1800 

P., .J., 1850 

P., W. F., 1805 

' Palamedes,' 1892, '95 

Palgrave, F. T., 1887, '88, '89 

Palgrave, Sir F., 1837, '40, '42, '54 

Panizzi, A., 1827, '28, '30, '31 

' Paolo and Francesca ' episode (InJ. v), 
P^nglish translations,* (Parsons) 
1785 ; (Jennings) 1794 ; (Byron) 
1820 ; (Anon.) 1836 ; (Merivale) 
1838 ; (Ld. .Tohn Russell) 1844 
(Leigh Hunt) (2) 1846 ; (.1. P.) 1850 
(Simpson) 1851 ; (Rossetti) 1862 
(Harding) 1868 ; (Morshead) 1875 
(Oliphant) 1877 ; (Thornton) 1879 
(Plumptre) 1883 ; (Shore) 1886 
(Griffith) 1898 ; (Williams) 1904 
(Martin) 1907 ; (Grinnell-Milne) 1909 
(Ld. Curzon) 1915 

Paradiso, early commentary, (F. da 
Buti) 1877 (MS.) 

Paradiso, English editions of tcxt,t 
1885, 1900, '15 

Paradiso, English translations,}: 
(Wright) 1840 ; (Cayley) 1854 
(Ramsay) 1863 ; (Thomas) 1866 
(.Johnston) 1868 ; (MacGregor) 1880 
(Butler) 1885 ; (Plumptre) 1887 
(Wicksteed) 1899 ; (Vernon) 1900 
(Potter) 1904 ; (Fraser) 1908 ; (Shad- 
well) 1915 

Paradiso, MS. of translation, (English) 

1880 (Bodl.) 
Parsons, Wm., 1785 
Passenger, of Benvenuto Italian, 1612 
Pater, Walter H., 1892 
Patrician, 1847 
Paul, C. Kcgan, 1886, "94 
Pavne, John, c. 1860, '71, 1902, "03, 09 
Peacock, E., 1876 



Peacock, T. L., 1816, '18, '22. '29, '60 

Peck, F., 1740 

Pembcr, E. H., 1897, '99, 1901, "03, '07 

Penrose, Thos., 1790 

Pentland, J. B., 1843 

Pereira, H. W., 1898 

Perini, N., 1893 

Peterson, Robt., 1576 

Petronj, S. E., 1816 

Pettie, Geo., 1581 

Phillimore, Cath. M.,1871, '98, 1900, '20 

Phillimore, J. S., 1896 

Phillipps MSS., 1837 

Phillips, Edwd., 1675, '79 

Phillips, S., 1900, "02 

Phillipson, J., 1900 

Philpot, S., 1918 '20 

Pickford, J., 1888, 1905 

Picton, J. A., 1874 

Pietrodi Dante, Comentum, 1829-30, '46 

Pike, Warburton, 1879, '81 

Pilkington, Matt., 1770 

Pinkerton, John, 1785 

Piozzi, Mrs., 1789, '94 

Pisa, Guido da ; see Guido 

Pitman, C. B., 1882 

Pits, .John, c. 1610 

Plays, 1893, "95, 1900, '02, '03 

Plummer, Chas., 1904 

Plumptre, E. H., 1869, '81, "83, '84 
'86, '87 

Plunkett, Count, 1903 

Plunkett, G. N., 1902 

Pollock, W. F., 1854, '69 

Pollock, Lady, 1895 

Pope, Alex., c. 1712, ["69] 

Porter, A., 1897 

Postgate, I. J.. 1889, 1916 

Potter, C. C, 1896, '97, 1904 

Powell, F. York, c. 1888, '89 

Pozzesi, A., 1821 

Pradeau, G., 1902 

Present State of liepublick of Letters. 
1731 

Price, E. C, 1899 

Price, Ricli., 1824 

Price, Sir U., 1794 

Prichard, A., 1848 

Probyn, May, 1881 

Proctor, B.' W. (' Barry Cornwall '), 
1820 

Procter, Geo., 1825 

' Prout, Father " ; see Mahony, F. S. 

Prowett, C. G., 1866 

Pulling, W., 1840 

Punch, 1883, '86 

Purgatorio, English editions of text.t 
1880, '83, '89, '92-9, '95, 1904, '05 

Purgatorio, English translations, J 
(Wright) 1836 ; (Cayley) 1853 ; 
(Thomas) 1862 ; (Ramsay) 1862 ; 



* As a separate piece. 

t Other than those contained in editions of the Commedia. 

% Translations of the Purgatorio and Paradiso which were published separately 
In the first instance, but subsequently formed part of complete translations of 
the Commedia, are included in this list. 



206 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



Purgalorio {coiUinued) — 

(Johnston) 1867 ; (Butler) 1880 
(Dugdale) 1883 ; (Pluniptre) 1886 
(Vernon) 1889 ; (Shadwell) 1892-9 
(Auchmuty) 1899 ; (Okev) 1901 
(Home)t 1901 ; (Potter) 1904 
(Wright) 1905 ; (Money) 1910 
(Hooper) 1916 

Puttenham, Geo., 1589 

Pye, Hy. Jas., 1789, '90 

Q 

Quaestio de Aqua et Terra, 1893, '97, 
'98, '99, 1904, '05, '08, '09, '14, '18 ; 
English edition of text, 1909 ; Eng- 
lish translations, (Broniby) 1897 ; 
(Wicksteed) 1904 ; (Thompson) 
1905 ; (Shadwell) 1909 

Queen's Coll., Oxford, Bequest to, 1916 

R 

R., G. W., 1890 

R., J. F., 1906 

R., M. H., 1867, '78, '82, '85 

Ragg, L., 1907, '13, '18 

Ramage, C. T., 1867, '71 

Ram^e, Louise de la (' Ouida '), 1895 

Ramsay, A. M., 1730 

Ramsav, Mrs. C. H., 1862, '63 

Ramsay, Sir W. M., 1913 

Rawlinson, G. C, 1913 

Ray, John, 1673 

Raymond, John, 1648 

Reade, J. E.*, 1838 

Reade, W. H. V., 1909, 16 

Rees, Abraham, 1819 

Rees, D., 1903 

Rendall, V., 1899 

Reynolds, Hy., 1632 

Reynolds, S. H., 1861 

Ricci, L., 1900, '03, '07 

Richardson, Jonathan, 1719 '34, [1913] 

Richardson, Jonathan, jun., 1722, '34 

Righton, E., 1893 

Ritchie, L., 1832 

Roberts, D. Lloyd, 1914 

Roberts, M., 1879 

Robinson, H. Crabb, 1802, '11, '25, '26 

Robinson, S., 1860 

Robson, Jas., 1781 

Roche, M. de la, 1710, "12 

Rodd, Rennell, 1888 

Rogers, Chas., 1782 

Rogers, Sam., 1810, '17, '30 

Rolli, P., 1728 

Rosciate, Alberico da ; see Alberico 

Roscoe, Thos., 1825, '.SO, '32 

Roscoe, Wm., 1795, 1816, '20, '22, '23 

Rose, H., 1889 

Rose, W. S., 1819, '23-31 

Rossetti, Christina, 1867, '84 

Rossetti, D. G., 1861, '70, '74, '81 

Rossetti, Gabriele, 1826-7, '32, '42 

Rossetti, Maria F., 1871 

■f Cantos i-xxxi only. 



Rossetti, W. M., 1861, '65, '78, '88, 1910 

Rowe, C. J., c. 1860 

Roxburghe Library, 1812 

Ruffhead, Owen, 1769 

Ruskin, John, 1842, '46, '53, '54, '56, 

'60, '65, '70, '72, '74, '75, '76 
Russell, Chas.*, c. 1913 
Russell, Lady Constance, 1918 
Russell, Lord John, 1844 
Russell, Matt., 1880 
Ryan, P. F. W., 1920 
Ryan, Rich., 1826 
Rycaut, Sir Paul, 1685 
Ryder, H. J. Dudley, 1882, '87 
Rylands Library ; see Manchester 
Rylands MSS., 1901, '08, '10 
Rymer, Thos., 1674, '93 



S., B., 1908 

S., J. B., 1894, '95, '96, '97, '98 

S., J. F., 1868 

S., T., 1866 

Sabin, A. K., 1906 

Sackville, Lady Marg., 1901 

Saintsbury, Geo., 1900, '12 

Sanford, John, 1605 

Sayer, Eliz. P., 1887 

Schram, L., 1895 

' Scott, Leader ' ; see Baxter, L. E. 

Scott, C. H. Montagu-Douglas- ; see 

Montagu 
Scott, Sir Walter, c. 1788, 1811, '16, '17, 

'22 '25 '32 
Scott' W.'bcII, 1893 
Scull, W. D., 1902 
Seed, T. A., 1902 
Selections from French Atias, 1797 
Selfe, Rose E., 1887, '90, '91, '96 
Selwyn, Geo., 1871 
Serravalle, Gio. da, Comentum, 1416- 

17, '44, 1.536-42, 1781, 1811, '86 
Seward, Anna, 1785, '88, '92, 1805, '06, 

'07 
Seward, Wm., 1798 

Shadwell, C. L., 1882,^92, '99, 1909, '15 
Shannon, Edwd. (' Odoardo Volpi '), 

1836 
Sharp, I., 1918 
Sharp, Sam., 1766 
Shaw, Edith M., 1914 
Shelley, H. C, 1892 
Shelley, Mrs., 1818, '21, '23, '35, '44 
Shelley, P. B., 1815, '16, '18, '19, c. '20 

'20, '21, '22 
Shepherd, Wm., 1802 
Sherborne, Lord, 1907 
Sherlock, Martin, 1780, '81 
Shilleto, Rich., 1854 
Shillington, H., 1902 
Shore, Arabella, 1886 
Sibbald, J. R., 1884 
Sidney, Sir Philip, 1581 
Simpson, L. F., 1851 
Skeat, W. W., 1866, '94 

* In Addenda. 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



207 



Smith, J., 1674 

Smith, Jas., c. 1830 

Smith, M. W., 1908 

Smith, Sydney, c. 1838 

Smythe, B., 1910 

Snell, F. J., 1892, '93, '99, 1902, '09 

Sotheby, Wm., 1818, '25 

Southey, Robt., 1801, '06, '07, '21, '34 

Spalding, Wm., 1841 

Speght, Thos., 1598 

Spence, Jos., 1746 

Spence, R. M., 1898 

Spencer, Chas.. c. 1697-1700 

Spencer, Earl, 1892 

Spencer, .John, 1650 

Spenser, Edmd., 1590 

Staley, J. E., 1909 

Stanhope, Earl, 1839 

Stanley Library, 1813 

Stanley, Thos., 1651 

Starke, Mariana, 1800 

Stebbing, Hy., 1831 

Steele, R. R., 1892 

Stewart, J. A., 1903 

Stillingfleet, Edwd., 1663 

Stokes, Marg., 1898 

Stokes, Whitley, 1857, '89 

Stone, W. G., 1879 

Storr, E. B., 1915 

Stronach, G., 1902 

Strong, Chas., 1827 

Sullivan, Sir E., 1893, 1902 

Summers, M. J., 1916 

Sunderland Sale, 1882 

• Sussexiensis ', 1878 

Swan wick, Anna, 1892 

Swinburne, A. C, 1867, '68, '69, '82, 
'90 

' Swithin, St.', 1901, '03 

Symmons, Chas., 1806 

Symonds, J. A., 1872, '90, '92 

Symons, A., 1902 



T., G., 1799 
T., H. M., 1902 
T., H. W., 1865 
Taaffe, John, 1822 
Tales and Quick Answers, c. 1540 
Talfourd, T. N., 1816 
Tarelli, C. C, 1901 
TarlUm Newes mil of PurgatorU, 1590 
Tarver, J. C, 1824 
Taylor, Cath., 1840-1 
Taylor, Edgar, 1825 
Taylor, Jeremy, 1653 
Taylor, John Edwd., 1840 
Taylor, Wm., 1798, 1805, '23 
Taylorian Lectureship, 1895 
Taylorian Library, Oxford, 1877 
Taylorian iMS., 1877 
Tempest, Basil, 1893 
Tennyson, Alfred, 1820, '30, '32, '33, 
;;,'34, "38, '42, '65 



* \a Addenda, 



Thackeray, F. St. J., 1894 

Thackeray, W. M.*, 1839, '48, '50 

Thirlwall, Connop, 1819, '41 

Thomas, J. W., 1859, '62, '66 

Thomas, LI., 1896 

Thomas, Wm., 1549, '50 

Thompson, F., 1899 

Thompson, Francis, 1897 

Thompson, S. P., 1905 

Thornton, R. H., 1895, '97 

Thornton, W. T., 1879 

Thorpe, Thos., 1829, '30 

Thurlow, Lord, 1813, '14, c. '20 

Thyer, Robt., c. 1749 

Tilby, A. W., 1920 

Timperley, C. H., 1839 

Todd, H. J., 1801, '05 

Tofte, Robt., 1597, 1615 

Tomlinson, C, 1874, '77, '78, '82, '90, 

'91, '94, '95, '98 
Tooke, J. Home, 1786 
Tooke, Wm., 1795 
Toscani, G., 1868 

Toynbee, Paget, 1886, '87, '88, '89, '90, 
'92, "93, '94, '95, '96, '97, '98, '99, 
1900, '01, '02, '03, '04, '05, '06, '07, 
'08, '09, '10, '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '16, 
'17, '18, '19, '20 

Tozer, H. F., 1874, '82, '87, '99, 1901, 
'04 

Trinity Coll., Cambridge, Donation to, 
1895 

' Trinity Coll., Cambridge, Late Scholar 
of ' ; see Hatfield, Jonathan 

Trobridge, G., 1907 

Trollope, Anthony, 1876, '80 

TroUope, Frances, 1832, '42 

Trollope, T. A., 1871, '77 

Trotter, J. B., 1811 

Troutbeck, G. E., 1895, 1901 

Tucker, T. G., 1907 

Turner, C. Tennyson, 1876 

Turner, Sharon, 1815 

Twining, Thos., 1789, '97 

Twycross, H., 1903 

Tyrer, C. E., 1898, '99, 1902 

Tyrwhitt, Thos., 1775-8 



U 

Udny, S., 1903, '05, '08, '14 

' Ugolino ' episode (Inf. xxxiii), Eng- 
lish translations,! (Chaucer) c. 1386 ; 
(Richardson) 1719 ; (Gray) c. 1737 ; 
(Baretti) 1753 ; (J. Warton) 1756 ; 
(Ld. Carlisle) 1772; (T. Warton) 
1781 ; (Jennings) 1794 ; (Wharton) 
1804 ; (Morehead) 1814 ; (Medwin 
and Shelley) c. 1820 ; (Anon.) 1821 ; 
(Roscoe) 1823 ; (Latham) 1826 ; 
(Montgomery) 1836 ; (Gladstone) 
1837 ; (Dowe) 1843 ; (Leigh Hunt) 
(2) 1846 ; (Napier) 1846 ; (G. J. C.) 
1855 ; (Morshead) 1875 ; (Pike) 

t As a separate piece. 



208 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



' Ugolino ' episode (continued) — 

1879 ; (Plumptre) 1883 ; (Shore) 

1886 ; (Griffith) 1898 ; (Vialls) 1899 
' Ulysses ' episode (Inf. xxvi), English 

translations,* (Leigh Hunt) 1819 ; 

(Morsliead) 18T5 ; (Pike) 1879 ; 

(Shadwell) 1882 ; (Vialls) 1890 
Underdown, Emily (' Norley Chester '), 

1894, '95, '98, 1900, '03 
University Coll., London, Bequest to, 

1876 ; Barlow L.ectureship at, 1876 ; 

Catalogue, 1910 
Upton, John, 1758 
Urquhart, R., 1895 



v., Q., 1902 

Vandam, A. D., 1878 

Vaughan, J., 1894 

VeUutello, A., Comento, 1605, '11, '27, 
'90, 1710 

V^ricour, R. de, 1858 

Vernon, Hon. W. W., 1887, '88, '89, 
'94, 1900, '03, '06, '07, '08, '17 

Vernon, Lord, 1841, '42, '46, '47, '48, 
'50, '58, '62, '65 

Vernon MSS., 1918 

Vernon Sale, 1918 

Verrall, A. W., 1908 

Verschoyle, H. S., 1905 

Veryard, E., 1701 

Vialls, M. A., 1890, '99 

Vieusseux, A., c. 1841 

Villari, Linda, 1894, '95 

Vita Nuova, c. 1637. 1775-8, 1810, '16, 
'18, '21, '22, '24, '26, '27, '29, c. '30, 
'31, '31^2, '32, '35, '40, '42, '45, '46, 
'47, '49-50, c. '50, '51, '53, '55, '56, 
'59. c. '60. c. '61, '61, '62, '63, '64, 
c. '66, C. '68, '68, '69, '70, '71, 
c, '72, '72, '74, c. '75, '76-7, '79, 
C.'80, '80, '81, "83, '90. '92, '93, '95, 
'96, '97, '99, c. 1900, 1900, '02, '03, 
'04, '07, '08, '10, '11, '12, '14, '15 ; 
editio princeps, c. 1637, c. 1702, 1816, 
'24, '48, '82 

Vita Nuova, English editions of text, 
1892, '93, '95, 1903 

Vita Nuova, English translations, 
(Lyell) c. 1830 ; (Garrow) 1846 ; 
(Rossetti) 1861 ; Martin (1862) ; 
(Boswell) 1895 ; (De Mey) 1902 ; 
(Ricci) 1903 ; (Okey) 1906 

Vita Nuova, MS. of, 1817 

' Volpi, Odoardo ' ; see Shannon, Edw. 

Vulgari Eloquentia, De, 1744-5, '60-1, 
'66, '75-8, '81, '85, '90, '96, 1810, '16, 
'17, '18, '20, '22-3, '28, '24, '25, '30, 
'34-6, '38, '40, '90, '92, '96, '98, '99, 
1900, "01 , '02, '03, '04, '14, '18, '19 ; 
MSS. of, 1900, '18, '19 ; editio jnin- 
eeps, 1781, 1834-6 ; English transla- 
tions, (Howell) 1890, 1904 ; (Heber- 
den) 1914 ; Italian, (Trissino) 1744- 
5, 1816 (2) '24, '34-6 



VV 

W., G. S., 1910 

Wadding, Luke, c. 1640 

Waddington, Sam., 1886, '90, '94 

Wade, Thos., 1837, '45-6 

Wainwright, T. G., 1820, '22 

Walker, J. C, 1805 

Waller, J. G., 1869 

Walpole, Hor., 1782 

Warcupp, Edmd., 1660 

Ward, Caroline, 1834 

Ware, G. L., 1862 

Warre, Marg., 1890 

Warren, A., 1910 

Warren, T. H., 1899, 1901, '04 

Warton, Jos., c. 1756, '56, '82 

Warton, Thos., 1754, '74, '78, '81, '85 

Watkins, John, 1800 

Watkins, M. G., 1882 

Watts-Dunton, T., 1890 

Webster, W., 1894 

Wedd, N., 1891 

Welcker, H., 1867 

Weld, C. R., 1866, '67 

Welsh, Jane B., 1825 

Wellesley, Marquis, 1839 ; see Morn- 

ington, Earl of 
Wells MS., 1536-42 
Wesley, John, 1790 
Westminster MSS., 1542-3, 1697 
Wharton, Rich., 1804 
Wheeler, C. E., 1911 
Wheeler, S., 1903, '20 
Whetmore, S. A., 1892 
Whewell, Wm., 1837 
Whitaker, T. D., 1813 
Wliite, B. C. de B., 1917 
White, T. H., 1841 
Whitehead, R. R., 1892 
Whitehead, W., 1901 
Whiting, M. B., 1902 
Whyte, Bruce, 1841, '59 
Wicksteed, P. H., 1879, '87, '88, '90, 

'92, '94, '95, '96, '97, '98, '99, 1900, 
01, '02, '03, '04, '05, '06, '13, '16 
Wilberforce, Edwd., 1903, '05, '09 
Wilkie, W. P., 1862 
Williams, Helen M., 1814 
Williams, Jas., 1892, '97, 1904, '06 
Williams, Lord Keeper, 1624 
Willock, L. E., 1915 
Wilmot, Edwd., 1828 
Wilson, John (' Christopher North '), 

1829, '31, '35 
Winstanley, Wm., 1660, '87 
Wiseman, Cardinal, 1855 
Wither, Geo., 1645 
Wodhull, M., 1811 
Wodhull MS., 1811, '86 
Wodhull Sale, 1886 
Wood, Anthony, 1661 
Wood, A. S., 1909 
Woodhouslee, Liord, 1810 
Woodward, B. B., 1872 
Worcester Festival, 1920 
Wordsworth, Eliz., 1890, 1919 



* As a separate piece. 



INDEX I. LITERATURE 



209 



Wordswortli, Win., 1805, '07, '17, '19, 

'21, '24, '27, '33, '37 
Wordsworth, Wm., 1899 
Wotton, Sir Hy., c. 1630, '39 
Wotton, Wm., 1697 
Wright, C. Gordon, 1905, '08 
Wright, Edwd., 1730 
Wright, I. C, 1833, '30, '40, '44, '45, 

54 
Wright, Thos., 1844 



Wriglit, W. J. P., 1902, '05 
Wyld. M. A., 1904 



Y., 1821, '24 
Yardley, E., 1901 
Yeats, W. B., 1896 
Yorke, Hon. Chas., c. 1743 
Young, Bart., 1586 



INDEX II 



(ARTISTS, EXHIBITIONS, AND PRINCIPAL 
SUBJECTS). 

Sole. — ^The dates arc those of the years in which the name occurs. For con- 
venience of reference the art entries in the Record are, as a rule, grouped 
together at the end of each year. 



Abraham, R. F., 1849 

Anderson, Mrs. W., 1886 

Anon., 1778 

fAnon., 1831 

Anon., 1842 

Anon., 1843 

jAnon., 1847 

.Anon., 1862 

fAnon, 1894 

Ansley, Mrs., 1817 

Amistead, H. H., 1872 

B 

Haccani, A., 1861 

Bach, G., 1881 

Batten, J. U., 1895, '97-1900, '03 

* Beata Beatrix ' (V.N. § 43), (Rossetti) 

1859, c. '60, '61, '63, '69, '70, '71, '72, 

'77, '80 
' Beatrice denies her Salutation to 

Dante ' (V.N. § 10), (Holiday) 1883 ; 

(Hunter) 1900 
Beaumont, Anne, 1824 
Beerbohm, Max, 1904 
Blake, Wm., 1793, c. 1801, '24, '27 

* Boat of Love ' (Son. xxxii), (Rossetti) 

c. 1855, c. '64, c. '74 
Boddington, T. F., 1836, '37, '43 
Brickdale, E. Forteseue-, 1919 
Bridgford, Thos., 1844 
Briggs, H. P., 1827 
British Institution, 1810, '17, '24, '38, 

'43, '46, '48, '49, '52, '56, '57, '58, 

'61, '65 
•Broadbent, A., 1911 
♦Brodie, W., 1916 
♦Brodie, Wm., 1849, '50, '63 
{Brooks, v., 1859, '86, '89, 1900 
Brown, F. Madox, 1882 
Buckland, A. H., 1903 
Buckner, R., 1879 



Caldcron, W. F., 1886 
Cardon, A., 1808 
*Carpeaux, J. B., 1871 



•Casella, N., 1893 

Cinematograph, 1912 

*Civiletti, B., 1876 

Clarke, Sarah F., 1869-75 

Cook, E. W., 1902 

tCooke, Geo., 1807 

fCooper, J., 1871 

Cope, C. \V., 1837 

Corbaux, M. F. Catherine D., 1835 

Cowper, M., 1902 

Crane, Mrs., 1893 

Crane, W., 1885, c. '90, '92, '93 

fCromek, R. H., 1802 

fCumming, G., 1842 

D 

D'Almaine, W. F., 1861 

' Dante ', busts, (Brodie) 1849, '50, '68 ; 
(Munro) 1856 ; (Hutchison) 1891 ; 
statues, (Hutchison) 1869, '80, '87, 
'90 ; (Armstead) 1872 ; (Civiletti) 
1876 ; (Troubetzkoy) 1893 ; (Walker) 
1894, 1904 ; (F. U. Wood) 1899 ; 
(Richmond) 1906 

' Dante drawing an Angel ' (V^. § 35), 
(Rossetti) 1849, '53 

' Dante in Exile ' (Par. xvii), (Leigh- 
ton) 1864 

' Dante sees Beatrice at a Marriage- 
Feast' ( F.iV.§ 14),(Rossetti) 1849, '51 

' Dante's Dream ' ( I^.JV. § 23), (Ros- 
setti) 1856, c. '68, '69, '70, '71, '73, 
'74, c. '75, '80 

Delamotte, P. H., 1876 

De Triqueti, Baron H., 1862 

Dicksee, F. B., 1895 

Dicksce, T. F., 1891 

Divina Commedia, illustrations, (Flax- 
man) 1793 ; (Blake) 1824-7 ; (Kir- 
kup) c. 1842 ; (Traquair) 1889-90 ; 
(Crane) 1892 ; (Batten) 1897-1900, 
'03 ; (Kelt-Edwards) 1902 ; (Rolfe 
and Rees) 1902 ; (McManus) 1904 ; 
(Ragg) 1907 ; (Paul) 1910 ; (Law- 
son) 1916 

fDixon, John, 1774 

* Donna della Finestra ' ( V.N. § 36), 
(Rossetti) 1869. '70, c. '75, '79, '80, 
•81 



I Engraver. 



Sculptor. 



X Lithographer. 



INDEX II. ART 



211 



Douglas, Sir W. F., 1862 
Dunn, II. T., 1871 
Duppa, K., 1801, '2.-) 
Dyct", Will., 1837 

£ 

Eastlake, Sir C. L., 18i>5 
fElliott, J., 1897 
Elmore, A. W., 1858 



Pagan, Louis, 1880 

Flaxman, .John, 1793, 1807 

Follcliard, .1. B., 1887 

Fortcscue-Briclvdale, E., 1919 

Fry, Roger, 1909 

Furniss, H., 1883 

Fuseli, H., 1777, '86, 1806, '18 



Gale, Wm., 1856 

Gere, C. M., 1909 

' Giotto painting Dante's Portrait ', 

(Rossetti) 1849. '52 
Goodwin, A., 1892 
Gordon, R. J., 1878 
Grafton Gallery, 1909 
tGraves, R., 1822 
♦Gregory, C, 1918 
Grosvenor Gallery, 1879, '81-2, '83, 

'84, '80, '87 



H 

Halle, C. E., 1887 

♦Hancock, J., 1850, '54, '02 

Hart, S. A., 1846 

Harwood, .1., 1848 

Haydon, B. R., 1804 

' Heaven's Messenger ' (Inf. vs.), 

(Poynter) 1862 
Henderson, W. S. P., 1842 
Herbert, .1. R., 1832 
Herbert, S., 1900 
Hogarth, Wm., c. 1758 
Holiday, H., 1859, '75, '83 
Hoist, Th. von, 18.37 
tHooper, W. H., 1909 
tllopley, E. W. .1., 1865 
jllopwood, .T., 1833, '43 
Hunter, Mrs. .J. Y., 1900 
♦Hutchison, .1., 1869, '87, '00, '91 



.Tacomb-Hood, G. P., 1910 
fJacott, J. .1., 1874 
♦.Tennings, L., 1912 
.Topling, Louise, 1892 
♦Joy, A. B., 1867 



K 

Kelt-Edwards, J., 1902 
Kendrick, E. E., 1820 
tKirclmer, J. H., 1876 
Kirkup, S. S., 1840, '41, '42, c. '42 



L., M., 1842 

' La Pia' (Purg. v), (Rossetti) 1866-7, 

c. '68, '81, c. '81 ; (Long) 1890 ; 

(♦Trentacoste) 1892 
{Lane, R. J., 1842 
♦Laurence, M., 1894 
Lawlor, J., 1869 
Lawson, W., 1916 
♦Leifchild, H. S., 1854, '60 
Leighton, Fred., c. 1850, '53, '55, '61, 

'64, '76 
Lemon, A. D., 1838 
Leslie, G. D., 1860 
Lindsay, Sir Coutts, 1886 
Long, E. L., 1890 

M 

MacGregor, .Jessie, 1892 

McManus, Blanche, 1904 

fMajor, T., c. 1758 

Marshall, T. M. B., 1855 

' Matilda gathering Flowers ' {Purg. 

xxviii), (Rossetti) 1855 ; (Leslie) 

1860 
Matthews, W., 1911, '12 
' Meeting of Dante and Beatrice in 

Paradise ' {Purg. xxx), (Rossetti) 

1852, '59, '64, '72 ; (Solomon) c. 1892 
Metcyard, S. H., 1918 
JMonkhoiise, W., 1859 
Montford, H., 1879 
Morrow, Geo., 1912 
♦Munro, A., 1852, '56, '57 
Murray, C. O., 1884 

N 

Nesbit, G. W., 1909 
Nettlesliip, .1. T., 1883 

O 

Oliver, A. J., 1810 
O'Neil, H. N., 1842 
Onions, G. O., 1907 
♦Ortner, E., 1860 



' Paolo and Francesca ' {Inf. v), (Fuseli) 
1777, '86, 1818 ; (Anon.) 1778 
(.1. R. Smith) 1803 ; (Oliver) 1810 
(Ansley) 1817 ; (Blake) 1824, '27 
(Briggs) 1827 ; (fRedaway) 1827 
(Herbert) 1832 ; (Corbaux) 1835 
(Cope) 1837 ; (Dyce) 1837 ; (*R 
Westmacott) 1838 ; (Lemon) 1838 



■f Engraver, 



Sculptor. 



X Lithographer. 



212 



INDEX II. ART 



Paolo and Francesca {continued) — 
(O'Neil) 1842 ; (Henderson) 1842 ; 
(Watts) 1845-7, '79, '81 ; (Harwood) 
1848 ; (Abraham) 1849 ; (Leighton) 
c. 1850, '61, '76 ; (Paton) 1851, '52 ; 
(*Munro) 1852; (*Leifchild) 1854, 
'60 ; (Rossetti) 1854, '55, '61, '62 ; 
(Marshall) 1855 ; (Gale) 1856 ; 
(Weigall) 1857 ; (Buckner) 1879 ; 
(*J. S. Westmacott) 1879 ; (Bach) 
1881 ; (Pittard) 1885 ; (Lindsay) 
1886 ; (Solomon) c. 1 892, '92 ; (K. B. 
Dicksee) 1895 ; (Cowper) 1902 ; , 
(Robertson) 1903 ; (*Rieketts) 1909 ; 
(*F. D. Wood) 1909, '10; (Nesbit) 
1909; (.lacomb-Hood) 1910; (♦Jen- 
nings) 1912 

Parkinson, F., 1909 

Paton, J. Noel, 1851, '52, '54 

Patten, Geo., 1843 

Paul, Evelyn, 1910, '15 

Phillips, H. W., 1842 

' Pia, La ' ; see ' La Pia ' 

Pickersgill, F. R., 1843 

Pittard, C. W., 1885 

Poynter, E. .7., 1862 

Punch, 1883, '86 

R 

Ragg, L., 1905 

tUaimbaeh, A., 1811 

flledaway, J., 1827 

Rees, P., 1902 

Reynolds, Sir .Joshua, 1773 

Richmond, Sir W. B., 1906 

♦Ricketts, C, 1909, '16 

Robertson, V. J., 1903 

fRobinson, J. H., 1842 

Rolfe, L., 1902 

Rolshoven, .1., 1896 

Rossetti, D. G., 1849, '49-50, c. '50, 
'51, '52, '53, '54, c. '55, '55, '50, '58, 
'59, c. 60, c. '61, '01, '62, '63, c. '04, 
'64, c. '66, '66, '67, c. '68, '69, '70, 
'71, c. '72, '72, '73, c. '74, '74, c. '75, 
'75, '76, '77, c. '78, '79, c. '80, '80, 
8081, c. '81, '81 

Rossetti, M. F., 1871 

Royal Academy (R.A.), 1773, '86, 1803, 
'00, '18, '35, '36, '37, '38, '42, '43, 
'44, '46, '50, '52, '54, '55, '56, '57, 
'58, '.59, '60, '61, '62, '64, '67, '68, 
'69, '71, '74, '75, '76, '78, '79, '84, 
'85, '86, '87, '90, '91, '92, '93, '94, 
'95, '96, '97, '99, 1900, '02, '03, '04, 
'00, '09, '10, '11, '12, '18 

Royal Scottish Academy (R.S.A.), 
1840, '49, '50, '51, '52, '54, '62, '63, 
'69, '87, '90, 1916 



• Salutation of Beatrice ' {Son. xv, 
V.N. § 26), (Rossetti) 1876-7, c. '78, 
C. '80, '80-1 



Sambounie, Linley, 1886 

Scharf, G., 1844, '51, '.54 

fScriven, E., 1805 

Scott, U., 1846 

Scott, W. Bell, 1852 

Shaw, J. Byam, 1899 

Shields, F. J., 1893 

Sidney, Geo., 1788 

Smith, J. R., 1803 

Society of Artists of Great Britain, 

1778, 1826, '32, '35,. '36 
Society of British Artists, 1848 
Solomon, S., c. 1892, '92, '95, '96, 1903 
.Stillman, Mrs., 1884 
Stock, H. J., 1881 
Stothard, Thos., 1802 
Swan, J. M., 1878 



■fTaylor, R., 1897 

JThomas, J. W., 1859, '66 

Thompson, W., 1891 

Topham, F. W. W., 1868 

Traquair, Phoebe A., 1889-90, '99- 

1902 
Trench, Hy., c. 1700 
♦Trentaeoste, D., 1892 
*Triqueti, Baron H. de, 1802 
*Troubetzkoy, Prince P., 1893 
Turrell, A., 1897 

U 

' Ugolino ' {Inf. xxxiii), (Reynolds) 
1773 ; (tDixon) 1774 ; (Fuseli) 1777, 
1806 ; (Sidney) 1788 ; (Blake) 1793, 
1824 ; (tRaimbach) 1811 ; (Ken- 
drick) 1826 ; (*Gallagher) 1835 ; 
(♦Carpc-iux) 1871 



Vita Nuova, illustrations, (Traquair) 
1899-1902 ; (Paul) 1915 

W 

fWagstaff, C. E., c. 1860 
♦Walker, A. G., 1894, 1904 
Walsh, J., 1830 
♦Watson, M. L., 1837 
Watts, G. F., 1845-7, '79, '81 
Weigall, Hy., 1857, '58 
♦Westmacott, J. S., 1879 
♦Westmacott, Rich., 1838 
♦Wood, F. Derwent, 1899, 1909, '10 
Wood, Matt., 1846 
Woodington, W. F., 1855 
Woolmcr, A., 1848 
Worman, P., 1906 
Worthington, H. W., 1821 



Yorke, Hon. Eliz., c. 1745 
tYoung, R., 1849 



f Engraver. 



Sculptor. 



t Lithographer. 



Suole a riguardar giovare altrui,' 

(Purg. iv. 54.) 



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